Definition of sentiment in English:



  • 1A view of or attitude toward a situation or event; an opinion.

    ‘I agree with your sentiments regarding the road bridge’
    • ‘City officials around the world echo the sentiment, according to Public Works Magazine.’
    • ‘In every country, versions of the past provide the raw material for nationalist and patriotic sentiments.’
    • ‘While I agree with the sentiments about having a winning mentality, it seems, however, that it is the same sports that will benefit at the expense of others.’
    • ‘A half-block down the street, two Rhode Island teenagers echoed the sentiments.’
    • ‘I agree with the sentiment regarding having a single armed female deputy on escort duty with a well-muscled male prisoner.’
    • ‘Youth elsewhere in the country also echo these sentiments.’
    • ‘Even such conservative antislavery sentiments all but vanished in East Tennessee after 1834.’
    • ‘Are sentiments in favor of this regime, in favor of this president, easy to understand?’
    • ‘These sentiments were echoed from the floor and members spoke at length about his lifetime commitment to the party.’
    • ‘What Thoreau did not overlook was his neighbors' reluctance to put their antislavery sentiments into action.’
    • ‘Our idea echoes your sentiments in the editorial: Learn more, to prepare for the future.’
    • ‘These sentiments were echoed by various right-wing publications and columnists.’
    • ‘With due regards to the sentiment of a former Minister, his proposal and expectation from the Board are quite controversial and need a sensible and deep review of the issues raised by him.’
    • ‘These are precisely the sentiments now being echoed throughout Democratic circles.’
    • ‘But many are beginning to regard such sentiments as little more than well-meaning rhetoric.’
    • ‘This sense of racial exclusion also began to take a toll on the patriotic sentiments of those who had been interned.’
    • ‘Belligerent patriotic sentiments are on display all over the world.’
    • ‘The weekend protests show that the antiwar sentiments are equally shared by people of all nationalities, races and religions.’
    • ‘Similar sentiments were echoed by other workers also.’
    • ‘Her sentiments were echoed by several other members of the public around Hampton Green, a busy but open grassland area.’
    view, point of view, way of thinking, feeling, attitude, thought, opinion, belief, idea
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    1. 1.1General feeling or opinion.
      ‘the council sought steps to control the rise of racist sentiment’
      • ‘Despite popular antiwar sentiment, the government has increased the number of British troops stationed in Iraq.’
      • ‘He stressed the debate is not aimed at stirring up anti-Japanese sentiment.’
      • ‘I think that the general sentiment at the moment is focused on what transpires this week in the Organization of American States, in Washington and then in Canada.’
      • ‘Opposition soon mounted, however, as terrible social and economic conditions fueled nationalist sentiment.’
      • ‘Patriotic sentiment is running high in my neighbourhood today.’
      • ‘Market sentiment seems to be relatively optimistic about the outlook for the US economy.’
      • ‘The potent rise of anti-US nationalist sentiment in both South and North Korea is apparently invisible in Washington.’
      • ‘Slowly Yugoslavia fell apart as secessionist sentiment grew.’
      • ‘She then tracks the development of antislavery sentiment and the movement toward gradual emancipation between 1785 and 1827.’
      • ‘But the critics were in the minority as mainstream thinking, as well as public sentiment, generally favoured growth.’
      • ‘Poor sentiment towards the technology sector was also blamed for the lacklustre performance.’
      • ‘Certainly there are few communities where anti-American sentiment is as widespread as in Fallujah.’
      • ‘Notwithstanding the somewhat improved results on Wall Street on Thursday, the general sentiment among investors remained grim.’
      • ‘They believed that Allied weakness in south east Asia and American isolationist sentiment would mean another short war.’
      • ‘Even though investor sentiment seems to be downright dismal, it may still not be dismal enough.’
      • ‘Both men lost their cases and seem to have made hardly a dent in the opinions of either their respective presiding judges or public sentiment in general.’
      • ‘Reflecting the broad sentiment against war, students participated from across the city.’
      • ‘The report, which would often be cited by journalists and activists, fanned anti-American sentiment around the world.’
      • ‘Unfortunately I think the American military establishment seems largely impervious to overwhelming American sentiment against the war.’
      • ‘What better metaphor is there for the general public sentiment in the United States in the 1970s?’
    2. 1.2archaic The expression of a view or desire especially as formulated for a toast.
  • 2A feeling or emotion.

    ‘an intense sentiment of horror’
    • ‘Freedom was an emotion, a sentiment, a madness - something which your generation will find hard to understand.’
    • ‘It's the result of a wider sentiment of fear in the community, brought about by our failure to satisfactorily tackle the misunderstandings and myths we have about each other.’
    • ‘The oil on canvas of The Knitting Lesson evokes similar sentiments of simple joys, maternal protection, guidance and love.’
    • ‘Smith referred to these emotions as the moral sentiments.’
    • ‘He warned that they were seeking to ‘embody a sentiment of rage and frustration’.’
    • ‘Trust based on emotional sentiments is the most dangerous thing because one becomes blind to the intent of others.’
    • ‘By ignoring or removing either sentiment (hate or love) is how so much design work becomes mediocre.’
    • ‘Our sentiments of love, hate, fear, anxiety, are each one of them the fertile source of whole series of illustrative dreams.’
    • ‘We all share the same sentiments of anger, disgust, and frustration.’
    • ‘Fear was again a sentiment that accompanied Jose and his friends.’
    • ‘Those of us who have tried one or more fads diets may appreciate the murderous sentiments.’
    feeling, emotion
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    1. 2.1Exaggerated and self-indulgent feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia.
      ‘many of the appeals rely on treacly sentiment’
      • ‘Their back-up teams might be more prone to nostalgia and sentiment, especially those who have honed their tallying skills over many the long count.’
      • ‘The visit to Ireland in mid-1963 was largely an occasion for sentiment, nostalgia and photo opportunities.’
      • ‘If they grow jaded, grow bored, or simply prefer sentiment and nostalgia to active participation, the last avenue of escape is closed.’
      • ‘The threat of violence nearly overwhelms any sentiment or tenderness.’
      • ‘They really react to the sentiment and the emotion.’
      • ‘There were tons of nostalgia, family sentiment, bonding, celebration, entertainment and even a message.’
      • ‘It may be very American and dripping with sentiment but thanks to Quaid and a quality cast, The Rookie has a grace and sincerity that makes you willing to indulge its flaws.’
      • ‘And the trend in some parts of the world is towards huge, high-tech, intensive feedlot dairy farming with no place for sentiment and nostalgia.’
      • ‘His annoyance is bitter anger bordering on rage; his sentiment is mawkish.’
      • ‘It would seem impossible to do this without drowning in sentiment, or exaggerating a delight in Beverly Hills excess.’
      • ‘This nostalgic sentiment is obvious in both the band's choice of covers and the composition of the band's own tunes.’
      • ‘But it is not just nostalgic sentiment which is evoked by railway history in the area.’
      • ‘It would have been all too easy for her to have played this book for sentiment and shocked social justice; her tone is blunt and unlaboured.’
      • ‘I've just given my new stylus a go and listened to this, for the first time in a while - call it nostalgia or sentiment, but it's hard to pick out one bad cut on this.’
      • ‘If the Old Firm make the break - if history and sentiment no longer inhibit them - he could be looking for a new line of work.’
      • ‘This is not to reduce Christmas to mood or sentiment.’
      • ‘The Irish visit was largely an occasion for nostalgia, sentiment and photo opportunities.’
      • ‘‘It wasn't sentiment or family loyalty that made him join, I don't think,’ she reflects.’
      sentimentality, mawkishness, over-sentimentality, emotionalism, overemotionalism, sentimentalism
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Late Middle English (in the senses personal experience and physical feeling, sensation): from Old French sentement, from medieval Latin sentimentum, from Latin sentire feel.