Definition of sensationally in US English:

sensationally

adverb

  • 1In a way that causes great public interest and excitement.

    ‘the chief executive sensationally quit last week’
    ‘he was sensationally beaten in straight sets’
    • ‘He has sensationally admitted he is sick of being labelled 'Mr Africa'.’
    • ‘His series of logical fantasies began sensationally enough in 1951 with The Day of the Triffids.’
    • ‘The Australians sensationally collapsed in their second innings.’
    • ‘He sensationally quit pop music yesterday, claiming the industry is dead.’
    • ‘He was sensationally cleared of all charges.’
    • ‘The lead singer has sensationally confessed he is gay.’
    • ‘The crowd was somewhat unfriendly and desperately trying to capture style, but they sensationally failed.’
    • ‘Just about every girl at her school loves this sensationally bright fabric.’
    • ‘Last November, sensationally, the bursar was suspended.’
    • ‘Almost 16 months ago, the commissioner sensationally dismissed a tax assessment of more than €1 million against the former head of government.’
    1. 1.1 In a way that is intended to provoke public interest and excitement, at the expense of accuracy.
      ‘violence is reported sensationally’
      • ‘At its heart it is an observational film about a family, at the heart of which is physical abuse, and it's not done sensationally.’
      • ‘He went a step further, labelling the TV host's campaign against the victim as 'sensationally irresponsible' and a potential factor in the killing.’
      • ‘The case concerns what is often sensationally and misleadingly referred to as the 'hospital massacre'.’
      • ‘Those anonymous scientists are the same sources who spurred him to report, sensationally but falsely, that the anthrax was likely coming from their government.’
      • ‘She has finally been granted full custody of her adopted son, which the media can now sensationally reveal.’
      • ‘An appellate court ordered them freed after nearly four years in prison, ending a sensationally lurid trial about alleged murder.’
      • ‘He subtly demonstrated how constructed reality becomes possible when television reports sensationally on real world events.’
      • ‘It sensationally reveals how the late princess enjoyed a 'moment of lust' with the late celeb, based on revelations by a woman who is actively re-energising her bank balance.’
      • ‘He argued that broadcasters covered the case less sensationally than many tabloids.’
      • ‘The boy, then 15, ran away from home last month, but not to join an online predator, as early local media reports sensationally suggested.’
  • 2informal Very well indeed; very impressively.

    ‘Bob performed sensationally’
    • ‘Marinated in curry and oregano, it was pink in the centre, tender, and sensationally delicious.’
    • ‘The volcanic landscape looks sensationally steep, enough to make the average country walker think twice about greasing his boots.’
    • ‘This screw-capped 2002 Riesling, with its gloriously zesty, floral, juicy fruit, is sensationally good value.’
    • ‘I've known people who gave sensationally good auditions, and then just moved on a little bit over the three years.’
    • ‘This actor is sensationally good!’
    • ‘Initially at least, the novel sold sensationally well.’
    • ‘This week alone I've come across four sensationally good bottles of wine.’
    • ‘It was described as "majestic and epic sensationally good playing."’
    • ‘It is sensationally simple: ripe grapes are simply tossed into a pan into which you have seared Italian-style pork sausages.’
    • ‘Banned and publicly burned, they nevertheless sold sensationally well, making Locke and Newton household names in educated circles.’

Pronunciation

sensationally

/senˈsāSH(ə)n(ə)lē//sɛnˈseɪʃ(ə)n(ə)li/