Main definitions of send in English

: send1send2

send1

verb

  • 1[with object] Cause to go or be taken to a particular destination; arrange for the delivery of, especially by mail.

    ‘we sent a reminder letter but received no reply’
    [with two objects] ‘he sent her a nice little note’
    • ‘A personal identification number is sent by post to your home address.’
    • ‘Two-thirds of the 82 million items posted every day are sent second class.’
    • ‘A first issue was that the letter had been sent by ordinary post.’
    • ‘A total of 940 surveys were mailed, and reminder cards were sent two weeks later.’
    • ‘A circular letter was then sent by post to all past and present serving members of the Gardai in the Donegal division.’
    • ‘We'll send letters and post notices exactly as we've done before.’
    • ‘Five months after her transfer, she sent a rambling 15-page handwritten letter to two journalists at the Adelaide Advertiser.’
    • ‘Send flowers if you think it is appropriate.’
    • ‘Letters informing parents were sent by first class post yesterday.’
    • ‘He writes regularly, sometimes sends a little money, and even occasionally telephones.’
    • ‘Twenty-three letters were sent by recorded delivery on one day.’
    • ‘She sends a birthday card to each of her 86 employees, and if she's in the office, she hand delivers it herself.’
    • ‘We said that we would send letters and post cards and call as often as possible.’
    • ‘Their relationship began 18 months after Myfanwy died, with a low-key old-fashioned courtship; he sent flowers, there were candlelit dinners.’
    • ‘A letter is to be sent to the Post Office and a special meeting of the council is being organised.’
    • ‘To return merchandise, pack it carefully (use the original packing material if possible) and send it back to us with a copy of your shipment receipt.’
    • ‘Letters inviting people to vote by post have been sent out by the three main parties in a Southend constituency against official advice.’
    • ‘I predicted the return of writing letters and sending them by post.’
    • ‘But the petition was sent to the Post Office too late to influence its decision to shut the branch on April 5.’
    • ‘For many people the use of email is now an alternative to sending letters through the post.’
    • ‘Ten minutes later I was in the Post Office, handing over yet another envelope to be sent by special delivery.’
    dispatch, post, mail, put in the mail, put in the post, address, get off, convey, consign, direct, forward, redirect, send on, remit, airmail
    transmit, convey, communicate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Cause (a message or computer file) to be transmitted electronically.
      ‘send your document as a PDF attachment’
      [with two objects] ‘I sent him an email last week’
      • ‘If you are sending work-related files to a personal e-mail account you could be breaking the law.’
      • ‘It's also important to protect the ministry team by having policies that avoid identity fraud (like sending an email under someone else's email address) and improper Internet use.’
      • ‘I use my phone for the most basic things - making calls and sending texts.’
      • ‘This morning the Chief Executive Officer sent out an email imploring everyone to take all possible precautions in the current climate.’
      • ‘A small start-up company based in Silicon Valley has created a system that allows users to send live video feeds directly from their Nokia phones onto the web.’
      • ‘This morning the entire office was unable to send emails until about 2 pm.’
      • ‘He admitted dangerous driving after sending text messages while driving over 60 mph on a motorway.’
      • ‘The worm then sends itself to all e-mail addresses it finds in the recipient's files.’
      • ‘Look, guys, stop trying to send attachments, OK?’
      • ‘I immediately sent the link to everyone I know.’
      • ‘Each year sees an increase in the number of text messages we send.’
      • ‘This application sends an e-mail alert when specified limits are exceeded.’
      • ‘One customer informed us that he was moving to another ISP even though PlusNet hasn't sent him any warning emails.’
      • ‘The opportunity to send a text message from the classroom, or use the mobile to call home and complain at the next break is a serious problem.’
      • ‘We work via email mostly - luckily we both have cable/ISDN so sending files is pretty easy.’
      • ‘If you like what you're reading, send a link to the site to friends, family, and co-workers.’
      • ‘By sending out our Christmas greetings by e-mail, ABP South Wales have been able to make donations to two local charities.’
      • ‘Pierre sent the Austrian webcam links from his home in Salzburg.’
      • ‘He recently sent an e-mail to his former headteacher, talking of how much he was enjoying the experience of studying in America.’
      • ‘You can also send text messages from your laptop.’
    2. 1.2Order or instruct to go to a particular destination or in a particular direction.
      ‘Clemons sent me to Bangkok for R&R’
      • ‘The Soviet Army initially believed that it was being sent solely to maintain order in the towns while the new regime consolidated.’
      • ‘It constitutes the Church's marching orders, sending believers into all the world to share the Gospel with every person.’
      • ‘He's fresh out of jail and he's ready to get serious about sending Hamilton in the direction he thinks is best!’
      • ‘Peaceful will be executed by a firing squad for cowardice because he refused to obey an order that sent the rest of his unit to their deaths.’
      • ‘Bong was sent home to instruct others in the art of air combat at Foster Field, Texas.’
      • ‘He gave us directions and sent us out the door where we caught another taxi.’
      • ‘This was a daunting task as funds had to be raised in order to send the athletes over.’
      • ‘When William heard of his arrival, he sent messengers ordering Count Guy to hand over his prisoner, which was duly done.’
      • ‘The judge then gave his majority direction and sent the jury away for further deliberations.’
      • ‘It would be very interesting to know the exact timing of the order to send the unarmed planes after Flight 93.’
      • ‘A spokesman for the renal unit at MRI this week confirmed they were at breaking point and may have to start refusing treatment, sending people elsewhere in order to treat the most urgent cases.’
      • ‘Jade Emperor cried, and he summoned Mountain God, ordering him to send mountains to fall upon the dragons.’
      • ‘They were sent to keep order because there would be two children that would need their help.’
      • ‘A unit was sent in the direction of the firing and four men were captured along with a grenade launcher.’
      • ‘The United Nations announced yesterday that hundreds of staff in Pakistan and India were ordered to send their families home in the next few days.’
      • ‘We have sent him on some orders for the excellent value recording, copies of which are being snapped up quickly.’
      • ‘The principal printed out her entries, made her do corrective work order, and even sent her for counselling.’
    3. 1.3[no object, with infinitive]Send a message or letter.
      ‘he sent to invite her to supper’
      • ‘Mr. Norton allowed the child to lie ill for a week - indeed to be at death's door - before he sent to inform me.’
      • ‘He was more a man of deeds than of words - he always performed what he promised, and when this had been done, he sent to let the petitioner know that his wishes had been granted.’
    4. 1.4Cause to move sharply or quickly; propel.
      ‘the volcano sent clouds of ash up four miles into the air’
      • ‘I walked quickly to the train station, my breath sending a cloud of steam in front of me.’
      • ‘She crossed the line and hit the brakes, gripping the emergency brake and pulling it up as she spun the wheel sharply to left, sending her car into a spin, the back end sliding out as she came to a stop.’
      • ‘Mike quickly pushed forward sending random shots toward them as the five of them cleared off.’
      • ‘I was bobbing along in my father-in-law's small yacht with my wife and small baby when we were attacked by a jet-skier who raced at us at high speed before turning sharply, sending a wall of water over us in the boat.’
      • ‘He sighed, then sneezed as an unlucky poke of the stick in the fire sent a cloud of smoke into his face.’
      • ‘She managed only to claw the piled ash, sending a cloud into the air.’
      • ‘On March 3, an eruption sent a massive cloud of ash into the sky, but there were no injuries or damage.’
      • ‘Under the influence of sound waves these tiny hairs move, sending impulses along a nerve pathway to the brain for interpretation.’
      • ‘In any kind of breeze they smoke like a forest fire, sending clouds of grey dust over the moored yachts and into harbourside streets.’
      • ‘The air became cool with a slight breeze that whispered and moved her cloak, sending wisps of dark hair across her face as they rode.’
      • ‘Anna quickly reloaded, sending the next bolt over the fence.’
      • ‘The blast of high explosive sent a cloud of dust fountaining into the air.’
    5. 1.5Arrange for someone to go to (an institution) and stay there for a particular purpose.
      ‘many parents prefer to send their children to single-sex schools’
      • ‘The brutality of ‘Victorian’ responses to otherness is echoed in Walter's bleak experience in the institution he is sent to after the death of his parents.’
      • ‘Magistrates sent Harris to a young offenders institution for 90 days.’
      • ‘Instead of sending him to jail, Anse arranges for Darl to be committed to a mental asylum.’
      • ‘Swindon JPs heard that he was disqualified for 12 months in October 2002 after being convicted of dangerous driving, and in April last year he had been sent to a young offenders institution for two offences of driving while disqualified.’
      • ‘They've decided to send him to a state institution, where he might have to stay for as long as three months.’
      • ‘The case was heard at Andover, which has custody facilities, in case the magistrates decided to send Little to prison.’
      • ‘The judge said he regretted having to send her to prison, but there was no other suitable institution available for her.’
      • ‘Her family was forced to send her to an institution.’
      • ‘Even though he had been sentenced to detention, the authorities did not have to send Joe to prison.’
      • ‘What they're doing is putting the veterans on Medicare programs and sending them to other institutions.’
      • ‘The judge was about to tell the jury something that could seal a verdict of first-degree murder and send Valessa to prison for the rest of her life.’
      • ‘That's why we gotta send Martha to prison with the common folk.’
      • ‘That is the way with war crimes such as genocide, the charge which has sent Krstic to prison for the rest of his life.’
      • ‘The woman has a serious personality disorder, she needs care in a secure unit with the necessary support services, instead she has been sent to an institution for the criminally insane.’
      • ‘Judge Hoffman said he had considered sending Lewis to prison for four months.’
      • ‘Eighteen months earlier she had helped send Coburn to prison as a prosecution witness in an armed robbery case.’
      • ‘They could have sent Smith to prison but decided on a curfew and community service.’
      • ‘His parents had faked his death and sent him to a mental institution, but why?’
      • ‘In the absence of a safe mental institution Stephen was sent to Bordelais.’
      • ‘And in her case, the most constructive thing to do is send her to a mental institution until she's well.’
  • 2informal [with object] Affect with powerful emotion; put into ecstasy.

    ‘it's the spectacle and music that send us, not the words’
    • ‘The tape was my first exposure to this music, and it sent a visceral thrill through me.’
    • ‘Another neighbour said the murders had sent a wave of emotion through the tight-knit community.’
    • ‘The enchanting vivaciousness his women exude could send any man into ecstasy.’
    • ‘A word of praise from the shop girl sends a flare of ecstasy over her face.’
    • ‘When not drinking kava, the islanders grow coffee, the kind that sends coffee buyers into ecstasies.’
    excite, stimulate, move, rouse, stir, thrill, electrify, intoxicate, enrapture, enthral, grip, ravish, charm, delight, give pleasure to, titillate
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • send someone flying

    • Cause someone to be knocked violently off balance or to the ground.

      • ‘With a swipe of his arm that contained more power than I thought possible he knocked me back and sent me flying into the crowd behind me.’
      • ‘It knocked him back, sending him flying into the corner of the table.’
      • ‘The jolt from the direct hit sent him flying out of his seat and across the cockpit.’
      • ‘Michael again easily avoided the blow and gave a sharp tug on the arm sending James flying to the ground.’
      • ‘It sent her flying to the ground and almost knocked her unconscious.’
      • ‘We'd gone a little way, and I was looking out for a good place to stop when, with no warning at all, the bike took a sharp twist sideways sending us flying to the ground.’
      • ‘He fought with her for the gun and sent her flying into a bedpost where she was knocked out.’
      • ‘What if the car knocked him full off the bike and sent him flying?’
      • ‘A Crimestoppers appeal in the Evening Press trapped the thief who snatched a 74-year-old man's savings and sent him flying to the ground.’
      • ‘After a while of walking I hit something that sent me flying to the ground.’
  • send someone packing

    • Make someone leave in an abrupt or peremptory way.

      • ‘The judge bought the excuse though and sent him packing with nothing but a warning.’
      • ‘Club chiefs denied that Jeffs had been sent packing for disciplinary reasons - though they did admit his behaviour had not been perfect.’
      • ‘And if they don't shape up, you will do all you can to send them packing.’
      • ‘If someone can't deal honestly with you, send them packing.’
      • ‘The driver learnt his lesson and whenever ticketless passengers tried to board later in the journey he sent them packing and drove off without them.’
      • ‘I can send them packing but I have elderly neighbours who may not be able to do that so easily.’
      • ‘The pensioners sent them packing with a threat to call the police.’
      • ‘Fortunately, they and I realized I wasn't ready to settle down and they sent me packing.’
      • ‘His side's attitude must be right or they will be sent packing.’
      • ‘When we were bored, I would take my gang along to dad's shop, play with his vast selection of nails and knives and generally bother him until he sent us packing.’
      expel, send away, eject, turn out, throw out, force out, oust, evict, put out, get rid of
      dismiss, discharge
      chuck out, kick out, boot out, defenestrate, show the door to, give someone their marching orders, throw someone out on their ear, sack, fire, give someone the boot, axe
      give someone the push, give someone the elbow, give someone the big e, bin off, turf out
      give someone the air, give someone the bum's rush
      View synonyms
  • send someone to the showers

    • informal Send off or eject someone from a match, race, or contest.

      • ‘Plate umpire Bill Miller and second base umpire Joe West noticed what they were doing and sent Day to the showers for violating rule 8.02 that prohibits a pitcher from putting a foreign substance on his fingers.’
      • ‘Wayne Bremser - he of the Matthew Barney vs Donkey Kong fame - sends me to the showers thus.’
      • ‘A loud chorus of boos rained down on Guinn in rounds 8,9 and 10 for his inability send Banks to the showers early.’
      • ‘He works the team for an hour or so, then sends them to the showers.’
      • ‘More likely than not, they will be sent to the showers early and rise up again - that ‘survivalist-at-all-costs’ strain of thinking always rises after a fall - at some other point in the near future.’
  • send word

    • Send a message.

      ‘he sent word that he was busy’
      • ‘They sent word that the soldiers were looking for me.’
      • ‘Some time later, Dad sent word via the neighborhood grapevine that it was time for me to return to the scene of the crime.’
      • ‘But shortly afterwards, Jeremie sent word that he was willing to hold his hand on the executions of the four, but not the entire death row population.’
      • ‘One day, he sent word from his ship that he would be coming ashore at Larry's River the next day, and word spread among the communities around the Bay.’
      • ‘They sent word that the Public Relations unit of the State Government would have all the required details.’
      • ‘They sent word to Kerr privately to ask him to explain himself.’
      • ‘Couvreur sent word of the human barricade to a local radio station.’
      • ‘When they reported he wasn't there, he sent word that he was.’
      • ‘We have a strong alliance with them and if they were ever in need they would send word, but no such message has been received.’
      • ‘The accused, however, were not present: they sent word through their lawyers that they were protesting the OTP's failure to present some materials to them as the bench had ordered.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • send away for

    • Order or request that (something) be sent to one.

      ‘you can send away for the recipe’
      • ‘I knew that you folks were on tenterhooks about the new black sport coat I sent away for, and yes, as promised, I did have an excellent opportunity to give it its first live-fire exercise Tuesday night.’
      • ‘The remarking process can cost up to £52 per pupil and, despite sending away for the remarks, many of the students are still waiting for their new grade.’
      • ‘So, I sent away for it and, shortly afterwards, I received my free Easyweigh.’
      • ‘The class sent away for a fundraising pack and received information and ideas as to how they could raise E1,000.’
      • ‘Do you go to your dentist (a few hundred dollars), or send away for the $39 kit advertised on late night TV?’
      • ‘A few years ago, armed with a few extra bucks from my quarterly student loan dispersement, I sent away for an exciting new book that appeared to be the answer to all of my questions about how the West sees herbal medicines.’
      • ‘In addition to the three free recipes in the booklet, the consumer can send away for a free recipe swatch containing 16 more recipes and information on Irish beef.’
      • ‘I really wasn't such a Johnny Ace fan but I felt bad all the same, so I sent away for his picture.’
      • ‘Rowena immediately recognized it as the Chow Hall apron her sister had sent away for.’
      • ‘My mother sent away for every free toy or book available.’
  • send someone down

    • 1Expel a student from a university.

      • ‘It's true, I say absolutely nothing insulting nor talk back to the teachers and they send me down.’
      • ‘A myth surrounding the vessels states that if a student drank all the beer held in one, he would be sent down.’
      • ‘Some have won fully paid scholarships to colleges and Universities and when they get there, they are sent down because the fraud that they perpetuated on themselves and others has now caught up with themselves.’
      expel, exclude
      View synonyms
    • 2Sentence someone to imprisonment.

      ‘you're going to get sent down for possessing drugs’
      • ‘This was before she was sent up to prison, Upstate New York.’
      • ‘Other prisoners were quite supportive - though they found it strange that someone had been sent down for a political campaign.’
      • ‘On his third arrest he was sent down for 11 months.’
      • ‘If they can do it for jury duty which can have the power to send someone down for life (or to the table in some US states), then maybe political seats by random lot might not be so strange.’
      • ‘He appeared to cement his reputation as a criminal sociopath when he openly laughed as he was sent down for life by the Special Criminal Court in July 1999 for the victim's death.’
      • ‘Because with that amount of cocaine, they'll send him down for at least 4 years.’
      • ‘An active member of the Communist Party, he was sent down for his involvement in industrial action by dockyard workers.’
      • ‘The courts were directed to adopt a strict ‘two counts and you're out’ policy, and he was sent down.’
      • ‘Ricky and Des were sent down because they refused to come to a deal and plead guilty when they knew they were innocent.’
      • ‘In 1992 he was sent up for murder and racketeering.’
      send to prison, sentence to imprisonment, imprison, jail, incarcerate, lock up, confine, detain, intern, immure
      View synonyms
  • send for

    • 1Order or instruct (someone) to come to one; summon.

      ‘if you don't go I shall send for the police’
      • ‘That's why I ask you to wait until tomorrow to send for the police.’
      • ‘We shall stand watch out here until you send for us.’
      • ‘‘I shall be sending for you and we shall marry and live together in France,’ he told me.’
      • ‘Since he told me to invite guests, I had to send for various prominent people so he could demonstrate techniques before them.’
      • ‘Niko's wounds would heal quickly enough and I instructed the Captain to send for the physician in the morning.’
      • ‘I shall send for a female companion to teach you about these things.’
      • ‘Iokaste sends for Oedipus and instructs the Corinthian to inform him of the news.’
      • ‘In a few days I will send for you again with instructions on your first assignment.’
      • ‘Servants shall wait on you while I send for your companions.’
      • ‘The doctor nodded ‘Shall I send for Jim and Jack to return her to her quarters?’’
      call, call for, call in, summon, ask to come, request, request the attendance of, request the presence of, order, contact, fetch
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Order by mail.
        ‘send for our mail order catalog’
        • ‘I sent for a copy and when I glanced through it, I thought it was really great.’
        • ‘On May 28, 1915 Gandhi assured VOC: ‘I shall now send for the book subscribed in Natal.’’
        • ‘Go to www.dharmatrading.com, look over their instruction sheets, & send for a copy of their catalog.’
        • ‘We phoned a place in Toronto to send for replacement instruments, but made the mistake of telling them they'd probably been stolen.’
        • ‘In order to do this effectively it may be given powers equivalent to those of the High Court to summon witnesses, send for documents, administer oaths, etc.’
        • ‘Athena Review, journal of archaeology, history and exploration, invites you to send for more information on a free issue.’
        • ‘Have you been invited to send for a TV for only £33.49?’
  • send something in

    • Submit material to be considered for a competition or possible publication.

      ‘don't forget to send in your entries for our summer competition’
      • ‘Don't forget to send your votes in for the man of the match, as these votes decide who wins the Evening Press-sponsored Player of the Month award.’
      • ‘Coincidentally, this week's is probably the best so far, and it happens to be a week when I forgot to send a post in.’
      • ‘You should complete it and send it in as soon as possible.’
      • ‘The Supporters' Trust has also appealed for fans who made pledges at the public meeting at Valley Parade last Thursday to send their money in as soon as possible.’
      • ‘So please complete the form and send it in as soon as possible.’
      • ‘You fill out a voter registration card and send it in.’
      • ‘My advice to anyone planning to come would be to send their forms in as soon as possible - it looks likely that we'll be fully booked out.’
      • ‘But she accepted that was still not enough and that the Department was still urging people to send their forms in as soon as possible.’
      • ‘Please be sure as an angler your submission on this final proposal is sent in on time.’
      • ‘There are a few sponsorship cards outstanding and people are asked to send them in as quickly as possible.’
  • send off for

    • Order or request that (something) be sent to one.

      ‘I sent off for a handy pack of cards containing useful facts’
  • send someone off

    • 1Instruct someone to go; arrange for someone's departure.

      ‘she sent him off to a lecturing engagement’
      • ‘Some men from the village chose the four to go with me, arranged all of it and sent us off.’
      • ‘After which they can pump up the girl, give her instructions, and send her off to ‘avenge’.’
      • ‘We knew, of course, that my marriage would be arranged and that I would bring the family honor when I was sent off to be married.’
      • ‘Alas now if he posted such extracts someone would probably complain that they were commercial posts and send him off to stand in a corner like some naughty little boy.’
      • ‘I better send James off to exchange them for more lightweight paper…’
      1. 1.1(of a referee, especially in soccer or rugby) order a player to leave the field and take no further part in the game.
        ‘the player was sent off for rough play’
        • ‘Football chiefs have warned that attacks on referees are leaving the game dangerously short of officials at grassroots level - after an amateur player was convicted of punching a referee who sent him off.’
        • ‘Imagine my horror when the referee - who was FA approved - sent me off for deliberate handball.’
        • ‘His intervention, however, was deemed premature by the referee and he was sent off for handling outside his area.’
        • ‘David was sent off for kicking another player after a tackle.’
        • ‘Ah, happy memories of my rugby playing days (I think there were two rugby playing days in total before I was sent off for ignoring the game altogether and chatting with my mate).’
        • ‘They had spent two hours talking about him without criticising him once, not even when he became only the second man to send someone off in a Cup final.’
        • ‘If I was the referee I'd have sent him off - it was a terrible challenge.’
        • ‘But City have seen a copy of Crick's report to the FA which mentions that Combe was sent off for assaulting the referee.’
        • ‘Although he wasn't sent off, the referee booked him, taking his season's points tally to 41 and resulting in a three-match ban.’
        • ‘In 2001, a fifth division player in Sweden was jailed for attacking a referee who had sent him off.’
        order off, tell to leave the field, dismiss
        show someone the red card
        red-card, send for an early bath, give someone their marching orders, sin-bin
        View synonyms
  • send something off

    • Dispatch something by mail.

      ‘please take a moment or two to send off a check to a good cause’
      • ‘I will then finish editing it overnight, ready to send it off via express post on Friday.’
      • ‘About an hour later, I was in a post office, sending it off.’
      • ‘I sent the videos off to America to have them analysed to check that I wasn't going crazy.’
      • ‘It will require that person to send that cheque off to the Inland Revenue Department.’
      • ‘‘We want people to get involved but we do not want people to send things off in the post, just to let us know and we will arrange to have a look at them,’ says Jane Sellars, freelance exhibition curator.’
      • ‘So, anyway, I shot off to the study to write a covering letter for the deeds and then to the post office to send the package off by special delivery, next day guaranteed.’
      • ‘I had to go to the post office to send a few posters off to those good enough to want to buy some off me (details on home page).’
      • ‘I only sent the form off last week and there in the mountain of post as a reply from them telling me I'm sorted to receive the statutory amount whenever I am ready to start.’
      • ‘I queued for the birth certificate, wrote the cheque, sent the application off, sat back and waited.’
      • ‘Before the boxes can be sent off, they need to be checked to ensure they don't contain inappropriate items such as liquids or war toys.’
  • send something on

    • Transmit mail or luggage to a further destination or in advance of one's own arrival.

      ‘I've got your catalog—would you like me to send it on?’
      • ‘The commission confirmed yesterday that all three main parties are ignoring its recommendation that they do not handle postal voting applications at a centralised local address of their own before sending them on.’
      • ‘Allegedly if I send it on to everyone in my address book my wish will come true.’
      • ‘Postini then filters out the spam and the virus-infected messages, among other things, before sending your mail on.’
      • ‘The cash would be carried in oak chests, and the keys would be sent on in advance for added safety.’
      • ‘A daily system of luggage transportation allows you to send your luggage on to your next stopover and cycle at your ease.’
      • ‘We would then send the calls on to our customer's destination.’
      • ‘I'm sending this letter to your old address, hoping that even if you've moved, it will be sent on.’
      • ‘Okay, then, I'll ask my people to send my luggage on later, I'd rather set off earlier and travel in comfort.’
      • ‘Corbeau set up his own postal service for the City of Liege; for deliveries outside this area he collected the post but sent it on via the normal postal services.’
      • ‘After the applicant had been given notice by the Home Office that he was going to be deported, his solicitors, through their inefficiency, sent letters on to the wrong address and, consequently, they were not received by the applicant.’
  • send out for something

    • Order delivery of something.

      ‘we sent out for pizza’
      • ‘Otherwise we send out for a Chinese or get something prepared for us downstairs.’
      • ‘Hogan was so embarrassed that he sent out for a brand new shirt and had it delivered within half an hour.’
      • ‘Wrote bits of script, drank beer and sent out for a takeaway and everything.’
      • ‘Diners will have sympathised with Ivan, who grew so fed up last week waiting for the chef to cook his dinner that he sent out for an Indian takeaway.’
      • ‘Chain-smoking in his silk dressing gown Apollo would occasionally send out for an antique or a rentboy.’
      • ‘Chizoba had just sent out for a double latte, and William had disappeared like a shadow on a cloudy day; one minute he was there, the next he was not.’
      • ‘Hollywood is where if you don't have happiness you send out for it.’
      • ‘‘Watson,’ he said ‘be so good as to ask Mrs Hudson to send out for a live rabbit from the pet shop off Brook Street.’’
      • ‘We're just sending out for sandwiches - ham all right for you, Mr Goldberg?’
      • ‘Everything was done and dusted by the time we sent out for pizzas - and a pie on a roll for Andy - on Saturday lunchtime.’
  • send something out

    • 1Produce or give out something; emit something.

      ‘radar signals were sent out in powerful pulses’
      • ‘However, the brutal nature of this incident has been recognised by the court, and I think the right signal has been sent out.’
      • ‘Passionate leadership won't succeed if contradictory signals are sent out.’
      • ‘To save time, this lure sends a mating signal out into the water to attract all the fish in the area.’
      • ‘Then why don't we outline an industrial policy, send the right signals out to all and sundry and just build the manufacturing enterprises.’
      • ‘They meet in the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican and let the world know what is happening by means of a smoke signal coming through a chimney leading to the roof of the chapel a smoke signal is sent out to tell the outside world what is happening.’
      • ‘When prices are held down this signal is not sent out.’
      • ‘Oncologists actually have a lot of evidence indicating that it is the tumor, not healthy cells, that send signals out to blood vessels to stimulate growth.’
      • ‘The president wants to send the signal out there that it's solid.’
      • ‘That will send a signal out there straightaway.’
      • ‘But ‘everything out there is going to be received back at the same frequency you send it out at… what you want is a unique signal,’ Williams said.’
    • 2Dispatch items to a number of people; distribute something widely.

      ‘the company sent out written information about the stock’
      • ‘‘This is important because, if we do not send this information out, people do not know what we are doing,’ she said.’
      • ‘The leaflet says information and advice on steps to be taken in the event of a nuclear emergency will be sent out on radio and television.’
      • ‘What takes most time is not sending your information out but waiting for their replies.’
      • ‘As soon as the error was noticed, a stop message was sent out by radio to all trains in the area and the two were never closer than three miles apart.’
      • ‘Even though many circulars had been sent out and the public meeting had been well advertised, the councillors acidly noted that the decision would not stop the public complaining that ‘nothing ever happens in Barlick’.’
      • ‘In China, I keep writing Chinese poetry and sending it out to literary journals around the country.’
      • ‘I point out that he's still writing and sending his stories out regularly.’
      • ‘The Associated Press sent a dispatch out of Bangkok that they considered news.’
      • ‘We'll be sending it out to all the radio stations to give the singers an experience way beyond all their wildest dreams.’
      • ‘I am writing this letter to send a plea out to the Airdrie people to keep an eye out for these creatures.’
  • send someone up

    • Sentence someone to imprisonment.

      ‘he was sent up for arson’
      send to prison, sentence to imprisonment, imprison, jail, incarcerate, lock up, confine, detain, intern, immure
      View synonyms
  • send someone/something up

    • Give an exaggerated imitation of someone or something in order to ridicule them.

      ‘the humorist who sent up sacred cows like school spirit’
      • ‘They have an answer for that too, though: they're not just sending people up, they insist, but seeking to politicise them.’
      • ‘Filled with endless mumbo-jumbo dialogue and obvious plot twists, it never begins to convince or enthral and is populated by actors who don't know whether to strive for sincerity or just throw in the towel and send the whole thing up.’
      • ‘In panto I send myself up playing the Gladiator role; in this the character is sent up in the story, and there's lots of fun at everyone's expense.’
      satirize, ridicule, make fun of, parody, lampoon, mock, caricature, imitate, ape
      take off, spoof, take the mickey out of
      monkey
      take the piss out of
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English sendan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zenden and German senden.

Pronunciation:

send

/send/

Main definitions of send in English

: send1send2

send2

noun & verb

  • variant spelling of scend

Pronunciation:

send

/send/