Definition of semantics in English:

semantics

plural noun

  • 1[usually treated as singular] The branch of linguistics and logic concerned with meaning. There are a number of branches and subbranches of semantics, including formal semantics, which studies the logical aspects of meaning, such as sense, reference, implication, and logical form, lexical semantics, which studies word meanings and word relations, and conceptual semantics, which studies the cognitive structure of meaning.

    • ‘Frame semantics is a linguistic theory which is currently gaining ground.’
    • ‘Most procedural programming languages follow natural semantics of control flow and hence are easy to understand.’
    • ‘It is significant that many linguists have sought to limit the role of polysemy in linguistic semantics, if not to eliminate it altogether.’
    • ‘I then present three arguments that this dynamic approach is more faithful to natural language semantics than static Montagovian theories.’
    • ‘From logic we have model-theoretic semantics, and from that possible-worlds analyses of modal and epistemic discourse.’
    • ‘Internalist semantics could really have saved a lot of trouble here.’
    • ‘Supposedly, there's never been a form of semantics, a language, that has existed that long.’
    • ‘She combines the methods of history, semantics, and semiotics to show how and why the formulae were first adopted in organic chemistry.’
    • ‘The approach combines a constrained-based semantics with a general mechanism of conversational implicature.’
    • ‘But this interpretation is outlawed by the semantics of referential dependence associated with reflexives.’
    • ‘So, the logic is justified by a semantics; the semantics is justified by a meaning-theory.’
    • ‘We must attend to social and cultural history in order to make sense of semantics.’
    • ‘This conclusion is not about semantics or language but has enormous implications.’
    • ‘The issue here is not one of political semantics but of analysis and prescription.’
    • ‘The real communication problems arise surely from divergent vocabulary and semantics.’
    • ‘At that moment, no amount of language twists or Libertarian semantics will be able to trick God.’
    • ‘It's enough to make anybody believe in the feasibility of linguistic semantics, at least for a while.’
    • ‘That is, the structure, semantics, composition and constructs of Maori language itself.’
    • ‘A change in language, in the fundamentals, in the semantics, the grammar, the very essence of the language.’
    • ‘Had I stumbled on a right-wing plot to subvert the semantics of English collective nouns?’
    1. 1.1 The meaning of a word, phrase, sentence, or text.
      ‘such quibbling over semantics may seem petty stuff’
      • ‘We all try for the same goal, in the end, though we call it by different names and kill each other over the semantics.’
      • ‘These well-meaning campaigners are chronically tone-deaf to pop cultural semantics and subtleties.’
      • ‘How about this - once Tariana starts addressing the real problems within her portfolios, we can discuss the semantics.’
      • ‘And if we all were to do that, we would realize that we don't need to fight over formalities and semantics.’
      • ‘This causes problems when a client is coded to use one service, but tries to use another service with different semantics.’
      • ‘In this paper we present a precise semantics for the two series of counting numerals of Latin: the cardinals and the collectives.’
      • ‘The point is that the semantics we use are not tick box mechanisms.’
      • ‘Lost in semantics and tears, he heads to his mother's house, where he hopes he at least will be in time for dinner.’
      • ‘It's not a matter of semantics this time, as were my arguments with people over what to call the sniper.’
      • ‘To me, the sound of a poem is at least as important as the semantics; so is the visual.’
      • ‘Again, this kind of statement is born out of faulty semantics.’

Pronunciation:

semantics

/səˈman(t)iks/