Definition of self-understanding in English:

self-understanding

noun

  • Awareness of and ability to understand one's own actions and reactions.

    • ‘He's started with an interesting exploration of his political philosophy, in pursuit of some self-understanding.’
    • ‘Its aim is self-understanding, self-acceptance and self-realisation.’
    • ‘Coherence is also increased by epistemological self-understanding: our understanding of why we accept the things we do.’
    • ‘This feel-good platform of self-understanding is a big deal to Michelle, and she's terrific at swinging conversation around to it.’
    • ‘The question of identity, the tenuous nature of self-understanding, and the seductions of self-delusion, are among her work's main themes.’
    • ‘For purposes of philosophical self-understanding, however, it is important to be clear that a phenomenon such as addiction can present different kinds of obstacles in the way of our acting well.’
    • ‘Here he sounds like the cautious elder, advising a sympathetic intellectualism that would open people to self-understanding.’
    • ‘These sorts of skills - from information gathering to self-understanding - could be taught in primary school.’
    • ‘The wildness of the forest enables a navigation of the mind so that a quest for self-understanding is akin to an exploration of the living natural world.’
    • ‘It is also the best path to self-understanding.’
    • ‘Such individualism lies at the heart of Americans' self-understanding as a people but it is a new idea in Europe and it makes the French particularly uneasy.’
    • ‘The self-understanding of the West has been divided since the Enlightenment.’
    • ‘It is a neatly convenient justification - that even if participants are unhappy in the short term, the experience may enhance self-understanding.’
    • ‘Throughout, Diaz pays careful attention to the gendering of this community's experience and self-understanding.’
    • ‘Attention span, processing speed and memory improve, as do problem-solving skills and self-understanding.’
    • ‘It tells the story of a mercenary who embarks on a journey of self-understanding and self-realization.’
    • ‘Humans have the ability to reconstruct self-understanding, an ability expressed in their self-narratives.’
    • ‘His presence was real, part of the living tissue of our culture, our responses, our most intimate self-understanding.’
    • ‘I asked him a fairly complicated question about the historical background to modern Irish self-understanding.’
    • ‘It was his view that our self-understanding and our understanding of our common situation have become ever less comprehensive, and so our capacity to respond is increasingly restricted.’

Pronunciation:

self-understanding

/ˈˌself ˌəndərˈstandiNG/