Definition of self-policing in English:

self-policing

noun

  • The process of keeping order or maintaining control within a community without accountability or reference to an external authority.

    • ‘With the instigator rule, it restricts self-policing, so guys get away with these kinds of cheap shots.’
    • ‘The AICPA spent only a few million dollars a year on self-policing.’
    • ‘In small communities you often get self-policing.’
    • ‘The early bar responded to these concerns with a combination of formal legal education and self-policing.’
    • ‘A reliance on markets and self-policing has failed to address adequately the important interests of Internet users such as privacy protection, security, and access to diverse content.’
    • ‘This has lead to a situation of self-policing within the industry.’
    • ‘It is obvious that self-policing is inadequate to serve the public good.’
    • ‘The remedy, says Lee, is vigilant self-policing by corporations.’
    • ‘Since current standards for self-policing are vague, many executives have gotten away with following them in form, not substance.’
    • ‘Without this self-policing, the field cannot sustain its own values.’
    • ‘While some say this opens the concept to abuse, Wiki moderators and self-policing in the Wiki sector appear to be taking hold.’
    • ‘Abuses like the torture and humiliation of prisoners will be left to the military authorities' self-policing.’
    • ‘What's common to all these situations is the feeling that people cannot rely on self-policing to hold minor delinquency this side of the law, or on external policing to enforce it.’
    • ‘In a sense I understand this self-policing that we do.’
    • ‘If groups are sufficiently tight-knit, they will be willing to absorb punishments on behalf of their members and will likely engage in self-policing to prevent future wrongs.’
    • ‘The model of community self-policing could take off in other contexts.’
    • ‘In response to instances like this, a kind of de facto self-policing within the Indian literary community has developed.’
    • ‘As for the accounting industry, the major lesson is that self-policing has failed.’
    • ‘This was one reason for their eagerness to stress the roots of the police in ancient traditions of communal self-policing.’
    • ‘This is part of a much wider trend that presents regulatory agendas as not just being in companies' self-interest, but often relies on non-statutory systems of self-policing.’

adjective

  • (of a community) independently responsible for keeping and maintaining order.

    ‘as long as the Internet community was relatively small, it could be self-policing’
    • ‘More controversially, the resource accounts are shared, with electronic statements produced for the street as a whole, leading to self-policing peer group pressure to achieve the targets and so receive rebates.’
    • ‘Rather than a system that treats students anonymously and resorts to metal detectors and surveillance cameras, Richman's schools have become largely self-policing.’
    • ‘They're anarchists in the sense that they have a perception that they should be self-policing and self-controlling, and in effect self-defining.’
    • ‘As with most Internet communities, like our own discussion boards, it's self-policing.’
    • ‘‘It will promote better use of the youth centre by attracting more people and will be self-policing because of the higher numbers,’ he said.’
    • ‘Seattle's Tent City is a self-policing community that allows its residents to live safely, and enables them to work by giving them a stable place to house their belongings.’
    • ‘There is a perceived problem with traffic congestion, but the congestion actually slows the traffic right down, it is self-policing, and is only for a short period every day.’
    • ‘Finally, the self-policing nature of science - scientific truth is determined by peer review, not public opinion - can be exploited by skilled purveyors of cultural resentment.’
    • ‘Then came regulation, as self-policing network standards-and-practices divisions responded to FCC rules.’
    • ‘Subsidiarity could turn out to mean something very different from what MPs and Eurocrats intended - self-policing rural and even urban communities, for example.’