Definition of self-identification in English:

self-identification

noun

  • The attribution of certain characteristics or qualities to oneself.

    ‘self-identification by the old person as sick or inadequate’
    • ‘They averaged 20.58 years of age, and their ethnic self-identification was representative of the institution's student body.’
    • ‘If race has diminished as a means of separating and segregating youth, by law, custom or self-identification, then perhaps together young people will turn their attention to the separations and conflicts of class barriers.’
    • ‘Questions concerning parent ethnicity and self-identification are not scored, but can be used for ethnic categorization.’
    • ‘Some people believe self-identification is the only reasonable method because it allows people to express their own racial identity.’
    • ‘There are a number of factors that may keep men out of treatment, ranging from lack of self-identification to perceived stigma.’
    • ‘Most of us rove in the middle range of self-identification, with an indulgent but generally people-friendly narcissism.’
    • ‘In a number of cases, migrants do seek to become part of the host society and over a period of time their self-identification as immigrants fades, though they may retain an ethnic identity.’
    • ‘The way in which the artist portrays the bean eater reveals, on closer inspection, a high degree of artifice and perhaps even a degree of self-identification on the part of the artist himself.’
    • ‘Despite these different approaches, both films question Asian self-identification.’
    • ‘Each of these groups has been ridiculed as ‘geeks’ or ‘nerds’, and each has subverted those terms into proud self-identification.’
    • ‘It is expedient to organize and conduct the work at this stage along three principal lines: self-identification, self-study, and self-evaluation.’
    • ‘If you choose to meet offline at any point, your self-identification can lead to actual physical harm.’
    • ‘The readers of journals of opinion constitute nongeographical communities, whose self-identification and links with people they have never met are no less real for that.’
    • ‘I suspect that self-identification will play the largest role in making the distinction, but we must also be vigilant for those who might maliciously misrepresent their politics in order to stay in one country or the other.’
    • ‘These three writers can be viewed along a continuum of historical reckoning and self-identification, from complete self-negation and self-hatred, to a more holistic historical reckoning and ancestral identification.’
    • ‘A critic might object that my self-identification as a centrist will prevent me from empathizing with liberalism well enough to elaborate a compelling liberal approach to foreign affairs.’
    • ‘This is not a reliable method, since the inflammatory response is neither as immediate nor as extreme as in classic food allergy, making self-identification of offending foods difficult.’
    • ‘The author's credibility to participants relies on their identification of her as ‘one of them’, a position reliant in turn on her self-identification with them.’
    • ‘Although my friends may simply have been scapegoating marginal individuals, I believe that the key to their response lay in the nature of their self-identification as a group.’
    • ‘ABC says that Republican self-identification is up 6% since their most recent survey, to 33%.’