Definition of self-assertion in English:



  • The confident and forceful expression or promotion of oneself, one's views, or one's desires.

    • ‘Is it an instrument of social oppression or of national self-assertion?’
    • ‘In the ultimate paradox, submission was to be the only meaningful route left to national self-assertion.’
    • ‘National culture became a celebration of aggressive self-assertion.’
    • ‘Two nations, born out of violence, continued through the first two decades after Partition to draw a line in the sand for their mutual self-assertion.’
    • ‘There is no room in the end time for individual distinction and self-assertion, but merely for adoration of someone far beyond the self.’
    • ‘Who hasn't taken solace in some form of greediness, self-assertion, or just plain carelessness?’
    • ‘Liberalism appears blind to its own forms of self-assertion and aggression (economic, military or cultural), and hence to its own part in the generation of this ghastly phenomenon.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the successful self-assertion of women in such a kinship system is at the expense of younger women, which helps perpetuate the cycle of female subordination.’
    • ‘So much change must have come with the new-found self-assertion.’
    • ‘For Jack, speech is self-assertion, territorial claim, a proof of confidence.’
    • ‘To do this, she may need to be trained in self-assertion and confidence.’
    • ‘It has resulted, in my view, from China's self-assertion.’
    • ‘We see, here, a politics of masculinity, its currency that of resentment transmuted into exaggerated self-assertion.’
    • ‘Their determination to scorn the dictates of the IMF and the World Bank and pursue their own strategies for economic and human development is a manifestation of a powerful wave of national self-assertion.’
    • ‘The difference between the two first sentences is the difference between a high-spirited epic of self-assertion and a slender account of the threadbare ego.’
    • ‘The balancing act between self-loathing and self-assertion got her through the wild days and has landed her on her present plane of serene renunciation.’
    • ‘There are obviously many degrees of cultural self-assertion, cultural defensiveness, cultural porousness and cultural boundaries.’
    • ‘It advocates walking the extra mile, which, far from being capitulation or forfeiture of rights, is unflinching self-assertion and composure amidst adversity or extortion.’
    • ‘The two figures, one highly individualised, dedicated to self-assertion and pleasure-seeking, the other ascetic and self-denying, are sharply contrasted.’
    • ‘No opportunity for self-assertion is passed up.’



/ˈˌself əˈsərSHən/