Definition of segregate in US English:

segregate

verb

[with object]
Pronunciation /ˈseɡrəˌɡāt//ˈsɛɡrəˌɡeɪt/
usually be segregated
  • 1Set apart from the rest or from each other; isolate or divide.

    ‘hazardous waste needs to be segregated from ordinary trash’
    • ‘The last thing he and his fellow polio sufferers wanted was to be segregated and treated as people apart, because they were not.’
    • ‘Our data suggest that this difference in tertiary structure alone will segregate these membrane proteins into two different diffusion classes as well.’
    • ‘One of the key principles in corporate governance practice is to properly segregate the powers for decision-making, execution and independent monitoring and challenge.’
    • ‘She has been segregated from the rest of the women in the prison ‘for her own safety’.’
    • ‘The key to good recycling practice is to ensure that all recyclable materials are segregated correctly.’
    • ‘It is also pressing for the lanes for public transport to be segregated from the rest of the traffic on the bridge.’
    • ‘In fact the only reason we're segregating it from the body of our posts is because it's got a different name.’
    • ‘The four inmates - who are segregated from the rest of the prisoners - were only allowed to associate with each other one at a time, until earlier this year.’
    • ‘The fragmentation of groups by government and police enable them to isolate and segregate different elements of a social movement in order to attack individual parts and impose an uncontested dominant structure.’
    • ‘Also, let us not forget that the military institution provides us with a means to segregate the less desirable members of society from the rest of us normals.’
    • ‘The securities laws now provide that a firm must segregate its customers' moneys and hold them in a separate client account.’
    • ‘The Pentagon's official policy is to segregate juvenile prisoners from the rest of the prison population, and allow young inmates to join family members also being detained.’
    • ‘I strongly believe that it is anti-social to segregate children's entertainment away from their family as a separate category.’
    • ‘They can be defined sociologically and claim a unity that partly or wholly segregates them from the surrounding society.’
    • ‘At present the army and the police are segregated from the rest of society, and are more or less unaccountable to the mass of people.’
    separate, set apart, keep apart, sort out
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Separate or divide (people, activities, or institutions) along racial, sexual, or religious lines.
      ‘blacks were segregated in churches, schools, and colleges’
      ‘segregated education systems’
      • ‘Brown has been overturned and the education system is segregated again.’
      • ‘The 24th Infantry Regiment was as segregated as the rest of the Army at the time; that is, white at the top, black in the ranks.’
      • ‘All segregated education must end.’
      • ‘The Alabama bus system was segregated by race, with the first ten seats reserved exclusively for white people.’
      • ‘Recent research into the effect of US Charter Schools points to the creation of a socially segregated two-tier system.’
      • ‘At first attending religious services segregated by race, slaves gradually accepted Christianity.’
      • ‘A public middle school in South Carolina is segregating its classrooms.’
      • ‘Black men fought in racially segregated units in the Civil War, first with African American officers and then, after 1863, with white officers’
      • ‘Racial groups are segregating themselves and retreating into ‘comfort zones’ made up of people like themselves.’
      • ‘The units are ethnically segregated and under a separate ethnic chain of command.’
      • ‘That fence has served its place, but now the different races living here aren't segregated anymore.’
      • ‘The result was a travel industry segregated along race lines, which reflected ‘not racism but ignorance’.’
      • ‘Blacks in Washington, led by Sojourner Truth, boycotted segregated public transport.’
      • ‘Schools in Dundee are already beginning to segregate pupils by gender for PE classes, a practice which was phased out after the Second World War.’
      • ‘Baltzell maintained that social status in the U.S. has been segregated along religious and regional lines.’
      • ‘It required that blacks and whites be segregated on the basis of race.’
      • ‘Employment opportunities in segregated or partially segregated settings will continue under the new legislation.’
      • ‘Up to that point, baseball had been as segregated as the rest of American life and blacks were forced to practise their craft in the Negro Leagues.’
      • ‘Even the federal government and military were segregated up to this time.’
      • ‘The effect of non-secular, religious and segregated education is very destructive on the society as a whole, and on our children's happy, normal life, and upbringing.’
    2. 1.2Genetics no object (of pairs of alleles) be separated at meiosis and transmitted independently via separate gametes.
      • ‘Sutton worked with grasshopper chromosomes, and it was in this paper that he showed that chromosomes occur in distinct pairs, which segregate at meiosis.’
      • ‘In the above simulation, I assumed that for every codon, there were at most two alleles segregating in the population at any given time.’
      • ‘During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair and segregate into two cells.’
      • ‘The first step of the linkage analysis is to test whether pairs of loci are segregating independently.’
      • ‘A further level of complexity is added in germ cells where homologous chromosomes pair and segregate in meiosis I and sister chromatids remain associated until meiosis II.’

noun

Pronunciation /ˈsɛɡrəɡət//ˈseɡrəɡət/
  • 1Genetics
    An allele that has undergone segregation.

  • 2Botany
    A species within an aggregate.

    • ‘During this drought simulation, the ME-transformed plants depleted soil moisture more slowly than did the wild type or the null segregates.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin segregat- ‘separated from the flock’, from the verb segregare, from se- ‘apart’ + grex, greg- ‘flock’.

Pronunciation

segregate

Verb/ˈsɛɡrəˌɡeɪt/

segregate

Noun/ˈsɛɡrəɡət/