Main definitions of seer in English

: seer1seer2

seer1

noun

  • 1A person who is supposed to be able, through supernatural insight, to see what the future holds.

    • ‘In Rome, there were no prophecies emanating from divinely inspired seers who could look far into the future or deep into the past.’
    • ‘This special form of astrology, we're told, was written by saints and seers thousands of years ago.’
    • ‘Throughout history, people have consulted a variety of seers in an effort to be forewarned of events to come.’
    • ‘Priests, seers and prophets, witches and medicine men were in a strong position to inaugurate their own system of extraction.’
    • ‘The dreamer, the visionary seer, not only sees, but does something, makes something.’
    • ‘Over the years, our sages and seers have tried to teach us that when we want to change to world, we must first change ourselves, in a world where geographical boundaries are fast disappearing.’
    • ‘She represented herself as a seer and used fortune-telling techniques such as palmistry.’
    • ‘Although a date had not been set, preparations were under way and an organising committee consisting of chiefs, traditional healers, spiritual leaders, seers and church leaders had already been formed.’
    • ‘If it does, I am a seer and a visionary and demand credit.’
    • ‘Instead of working them out at the personal friendship level, they hide behind their status as a seer in the Pagan community.’
    • ‘Traditionally, these areas would be the domain of the ‘witch doctor’ or seer, wizard, shaman, wise man/woman, whatever they may be called.’
    • ‘Believers have declared that this is a prophecy of the Great Fire of London, which is also said to have been foretold by Nostradamus and other seers.’
    • ‘They are our ministers and priests, spiritualists and seers, charged with leading the flock to higher ground.’
    • ‘On the other hand, the gathering of seers and sages, prophets and priests, conjurors and con men, was a strategic assemblage of those who wielded some degree of power.’
    • ‘During this period the sages and seers took to the practice of retiring into the forests to contemplate ‘the cream of all and what takes place’.’
    • ‘Rather than assuming that people give off auras or energy fields that can only be detected by rigged cameras or trained seers, we need only assume that the phenomenon of synaesthesia is taking place.’
    • ‘Tarot cards, fortune tellers, seers and old and very powerful creatures have a limited ability to view fragmented pieces of the future.’
    • ‘That light was pre-existent, but at that moment the awakened seers received the vision to see light.’
    • ‘Similarly, the great sages and seers, prophets and avatars also are sources for determining beneficial karma.’
    • ‘This mental domicile was furnished with a potpourri of notions derived directly or indirectly from a long succession of philosophers, sages, and seers East and West.’
    prophet, prophetess, sibyl, augur, soothsayer, wise man, wise woman, sage, oracle, prognosticator, prophesier, forecaster of the future, diviner, fortune teller, crystal gazer, clairvoyant, psychic, spiritualist, medium
    spaeman, spaewife
    haruspex, vaticinator, oracler
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An expert who provides forecasts of the economic or political future.
      ‘our seers have grown gloomier about prospects for growth’
      • ‘While your disciples are journalists and blaspheming healers mine are seers and political strategists.’
      • ‘Looking back on his comments a little more than a year later, it is hard to give the former governor high marks as an economic seer.’
  • 2archaic [usually in combination] A person who sees something specified.

    ‘a seer of the future’
    ‘ghost-seers’

Origin

Middle English: from see + -er.

Pronunciation:

seer

/sir/

Main definitions of seer in English

: seer1seer2

seer2

noun

  • (in South Asia) a varying unit of weight (about one kilogram) or liquid measure (about one liter)

Origin

From Hindi ser.

Pronunciation:

seer

/sir/