Main definitions of sedate in US English:

: sedate1sedate2

sedate1

adjective

  • 1Calm, dignified, and unhurried.

    ‘in the old days, business was carried on at a rather more sedate pace’
    • ‘The Op. 71 and Op. 74 were composed in 1793 during a relatively sedate period in Vienna.’
    • ‘Lucas followed behind at a more sedate pace, and neither looked happy.’
    • ‘Entering the congestion of the pueblo, the Freeman slowed the team to a more sedate pace and studied her closely.’
    • ‘The book world is swayed by fads, too, though at much more sedate pace compared to the clothing business.’
    • ‘There are a number of orchestras here which also remind us of those days when everything was calmer and more sedate.’
    • ‘I'd intended to be mature and sedate and demure and just wistfully watch the young guests from afar.’
    • ‘Barnsley batted first and looked composed, if a little sedate, in reaching 25 off 14 tidy overs from Duncan Snell and Rob Flack.’
    • ‘Much like draining a bathtub, going down in a lock is fairly sedate.’
    • ‘This does not reflect well on the sedate, calm and collected gentleman that I hallucinated myself to be.’
    • ‘The old rock-and-lava ball had built up a nice ozone shield under which life could evolve at a properly sedate pace.’
    • ‘Thus far into the interview the pace has been sedate, almost jovial.’
    • ‘And I spent the last twenty minutes of the exam writing at a fairly sedate rate.’
    • ‘He followed her at a more sedate pace that was faster than it seemed.’
    • ‘As she drew near the room, Morgan slowed her pace to a much more sedate walk.’
    • ‘I followed it down at a more sedate pace to the jeers of my mates.’
    • ‘Got the ticket and set out on the road again at a very sedate pace and being very careful with my driving.’
    • ‘Flitting between two worlds, constantly joining up and linking two experiences, this books travels at a sedate pace to its conclusion.’
    • ‘But how often does one see a youngster moving on a scooterette at a sedate pace, between 42 and 50 kmph?’
    • ‘After the baptism of fire that was the Border, Christy found the pace of policing in Westport a little more sedate.’
    • ‘Tullow Street may look calm and sedate most mid week days but come the weekends it is an entirely different place.’
    calm, tranquil, placid, composed, serene, steady, unruffled, imperturbable, unflappable
    slow, unhurried, relaxed, leisurely, unrushed, slow-moving, slow-going, slow and steady, easy, easy-going, gentle, comfortable, restful, undemanding, lazy, languid, languorous, plodding, dawdling, leisured, measured, steady
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Quiet and rather dull.
      ‘sedate suburban domesticity’
      • ‘The neighborhood was sedate and quiet as all the inhabitants were at work.’
      • ‘Boxing day has also been a relatively sedate affair (so far).’
      • ‘I would wager that when our defence minister made fun of you, Elsie, he was wearing a boring black or blue suit and a sedate tie.’
      • ‘Organizer Richard MacKinnon admits that the crowd is still fairly sedate and lacks diversity.’
      • ‘Compared with the cricket, they were all rather sedate.’
      • ‘For not having won a title since 1917, the celebration was relatively sedate.’
      • ‘If you haven't figured it yet, this is an elegy to my city's once quiet, sedate, pleasant city roads, a haven for motorists.’
      • ‘The company has gone for a rather sedate slate grey casing leaving brash corporate silver behind.’
      • ‘Being a sedate and sombre brunette could get boring eventually.’
      • ‘The world of biblical interpretation is a calm and sedate world.’
      • ‘But all this makes it rather quieter, and more sedate, and a perfect place for stage two.’
      • ‘I'm a member of the House of Lords, which is very much more sedate and dignified than the House of Commons.’
      • ‘She looked out the front window at the street below them, which appeared deceptively quiet and sedate as a cart rolled by innocently.’
      • ‘The normally sedate hamlet now resembles the set of Robocop.’
      • ‘I'm a bit sedate, perhaps staid in the eyes of others.’
      • ‘Village cricket isn't the dull, sedate affair for which I had dismissed it.’
      • ‘Others prefer a quieter, more sedate setting in Burras Lane or Birdcage Walk.’
      • ‘In Britain, political activists have taken a rather more sedate approach.’
      • ‘Smith's case had brought unusual drama to the normally sedate high court.’

Origin

Late Middle English (originally as a medical term meaning ‘not sore or painful’, also ‘calm, tranquil’): from Latin sedatus, past participle of sedare ‘settle’, from sedere ‘sit’.

Pronunciation

sedate

/səˈdeɪt//səˈdāt/

Main definitions of sedate in US English:

: sedate1sedate2

sedate2

verb

[with object]
  • Calm (someone) or make them sleep by administering a sedative drug.

    ‘she was heavily sedated’
    • ‘I was treated very well in hospital, I was sedated that first night, and we basically went from there.’
    • ‘He was taken to the Great Western Hospital where he was sedated and treated for head injuries.’
    • ‘In fact, I now get requests to stop morphine because it is sedating the patient too much, even when the patient does have pain.’
    • ‘Once it catches your attention, television sedates you like a drug.’
    • ‘The researchers at first tried to deliver the gene therapy while the patients were sedated but awake.’
    • ‘The couple sat by the bedside of their heavily sedated son and explained to him what they were thinking of doing.’
    • ‘Establish a baseline of sensorium and cognitive function before sedating the patient.’
    • ‘Combined with that, we give a combination of a valium-type drug and an intravenous anaesthetic agent to sedate you during the process.’
    • ‘She said her mother was heavily sedated as part of her treatment and needed to be tied into her chair to stop her falling.’
    • ‘If it is less traumatic for the patient, these activities are performed after the patient is sedated.’
    • ‘Patients with obstructive sleep apnea should avoid alcohol and other sedating agents.’
    • ‘His lawyers also claimed that he was heavily sedated with antipsychotic drugs during his trial.’
    • ‘After the patient is properly sedated perform the orotracheal procedure.’
    • ‘I have no recollection of the actual event, or the following week during which I was heavily sedated.’
    • ‘Muscle relaxants such as cyclobenzaprine or diazepam work mostly by sedating patients and preventing activity.’
    • ‘The procedure generally involves sedating your child.’
    • ‘The anesthesia care provider then further sedates the patient intravenously.’
    • ‘The person is sedated and should not eat or drink for a few hours before the procedure.’
    • ‘The anesthesia care provider sedates the patient to achieve an appropriate monitored anesthesia care level.’
    • ‘She was heavily sedated but she couldn't even open her eyes for the first few days.’
    tranquillize, give a sedative to, put under sedation, calm down, quieten, pacify, soothe, relax, dope, drug, administer drugs to, administer narcotics to, administer opiates to, knock out, anaesthetize
    View synonyms

Origin

1960s: back-formation from sedation.

Pronunciation

sedate

/səˈdeɪt//səˈdāt/