Definition of scurrilous in English:

scurrilous

adjective

  • 1Making or spreading scandalous claims about someone with the intention of damaging their reputation.

    ‘a scurrilous attack on his integrity’
    • ‘There's also a tendency I think to downplay, or forget, or make light of just how scurrilous and damaging a charge this was.’
    • ‘The work was widely attacked as blasphemous and scurrilous, occasionally praised as blunt and plain; its apparent flippancy was certainly intended to be provocative, and long remained so.’
    • ‘The further matter, that of being scurrilous and spreading speculation, is a matter for voyeurs, not Ministers.’
    • ‘Seems he's learned to hold back the tears and keep a stiff upper lip when political operatives spread scurrilous lies and outright falsehoods.’
    • ‘Well I suppose you all know what I'm assuming: that within the Liberal Party there are strategies to discredit the Greens, of which this scurrilous attack is an example.’
    • ‘The scurrilous claim is based on a survey that showed smoking levels were falling among teenagers.’
    • ‘That's an attitude that really resonates with the LGBT community, which has had to face down scurrilous attacks for years.’
    • ‘These scurrilous and totally unfounded allegations will be proven false in a court room.’
    • ‘We still have this need to balance the rehabilitation of offenders and the damage to people by scurrilous allegations.’
    • ‘Once again the press enthusiastically publicised these scurrilous claims.’
    • ‘With all this scurrilous scandal that is around, it is important to get it into context.’
    • ‘Those claims were both hypothetical and injudicious and could hinder police investigations when ensued by the ranting claims and scurrilous allegations by a small number of egocentric politicians.’
    • ‘But the most scurrilous attack came during the height of last summer's gas price boom.’
    • ‘When Irving turns to Churchill as Prime Minister in 1940 he levels his most scurrilous attacks.’
    • ‘They have accepted hearsay, endorsed scurrilous attacks, and walked away from their responsibilities as pastoral shepherds and teachers.’
    • ‘To speak of them in those terms that he did represents a scurrilous attack on their dedication and professionalism and I condemn it utterly.’
    • ‘The scurrilous attacks on the Congress were water on a duck's back to me.’
    • ‘This remains a balanced view which answers the many scurrilous attacks by academics and popular writers out to debunk.’
    • ‘It doesn't matter how awful the accusation is, it doesn't matter how scurrilous and unfounded it is.’
    • ‘He described the article as a scurrilous attack on the personal character of a judge, which may constitute a contempt of court.’
    abusive, vituperative, derogatory, disparaging, denigratory, pejorative, deprecatory, insulting, offensive, defamatory, slanderous, libellous, scandalous, opprobrious, vitriolic, venomous
    unfounded, ill-founded, groundless, baseless, unsubstantiated, unwarranted, unsupported, insupportable, uncorroborated, unjustified, unjustifiable
    bitchy
    contumelious, calumnious, calumniatory, aspersive, invective
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Humorously insulting.
      ‘a very funny collection of bawdy and scurrilous writings’
      • ‘It is a repetitious and tedious work, a mixture of scholarship and scurrilous invective, but Milton himself was well satisfied with it.’
      • ‘No insult was deemed too scurrilous to hurl at Honeyford.’
      • ‘This chitchat - bitchy but accepting, faintly scurrilous but jovial - was yet another example of Hollywood wishfulness.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from French scurrile or Latin scurrilus (from scurra buffoon) + -ous.

Pronunciation:

scurrilous

/ˈskərələs/