Main definitions of scrap in English

: scrap1scrap2

scrap1

noun

  • 1A small piece or amount of something, especially one that is left over after the greater part has been used.

    ‘I scribbled her address on a scrap of paper’
    ‘scraps of information’
    • ‘I learned that Nathaniel Hawthorne, the author, was obsessed with the number 64 and wrote it on scraps of paper wherever he went.’
    • ‘Hand-held scraps of sandpaper are the best option for pressing into elaborate cornicing and mouldings, leaving your hands crying out for Vaseline afterwards.’
    • ‘Its floor was covered with scraps of fur, wood shavings, twigs, numerous artifacts, and an occasional flagstone.’
    • ‘All of the Security Council resolutions and condemnations would still be issued and still be ignored, scraps of paper amounting to nothing.’
    • ‘She got up and went to the box where she kept special scraps of paper or clippings.’
    • ‘Like a quilt made from drastically different scraps of fabric, the puzzle they kept trying to piece together stubbornly pulled apart.’
    • ‘The nearby street was littered with shattered vehicles, pieces of glass, bricks, mangled steel and scraps of clothing.’
    • ‘I'd picked up these scraps of knowledge in two ways.’
    • ‘He always had a treat for me; a piece of lard, scraps of smoked fish or ham served with a bright smile and a pat on the head.’
    • ‘If someone began putting together all the scraps of information about you that are scattered round the net in this form, they'd quickly build a pretty detailed picture of your life.’
    • ‘Before long, struck flints and small scraps of Neolithic pottery were uncovered and, after a week, the team found its first burial site.’
    • ‘It is an art to piece together a picture from the millions of scraps of data that are available.’
    • ‘Random scraps of memories of days gone by kept coming all day.’
    • ‘Women or tailors give Baye Falls scraps of fabric to sew together into colorful patchwork clothing.’
    • ‘He saw deep tire tracks in the sand, with wood chips and a few scraps of driftwood littering the beach.’
    • ‘They point to a recent survey which found scraps of plastic in the digestive systems of 96% of dead seabirds.’
    • ‘Over the course of the conference, numerous participants came up to the table and carefully stapled their scraps of paper to it.’
    • ‘He was doing something unheard of: calling the hunters in their territories, looking for scraps of information.’
    • ‘To them, and to anyone else considering going to the baths, I offer the following scraps of advice and tidbits of wisdom, which years of experience entitle me to bestow.’
    • ‘The room fell temporarily silent as the three pieced together all scraps of information.’
    fragment, piece, bit, offcut, oddment, snippet, snip, tatter, wisp, shred, remnant
    bit, speck, iota, particle, ounce, whit, jot, atom, shred, crumb, morsel, fragment, grain, drop, hint, touch, trace, suggestion, whisper, suspicion, scintilla, spot, mite, tittle, jot or tittle, modicum
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1scraps Bits of uneaten food left after a meal, especially when fed to animals.
      ‘he filled Sammy's bowls with fresh water and scraps’
      • ‘For the raccoons, he left food scraps in a hubcap dish leashed by chain to a tree so the animals wouldn't drag it under the cottage.’
      • ‘They ate ravenously, reducing the meals to a few scraps.’
      • ‘Instead of premium feed, goats are given food industry scraps, low-quality hay, or an overload of cheap grains.’
      • ‘I am astounded that we are not able to put compostable waste such as food scraps etc in the green bin.’
      • ‘Rats thrived in towns in the Middle Ages, where food scraps and other waste was usually dumped out of windows and onto the streets.’
      • ‘Never leave any food, even leftover scraps or candy bars, around your tent or campfire.’
      • ‘Bacteria and other organisms break down food scraps buried in a bin maintained at proper temperature and moisture levels.’
      • ‘Soon the cats began to feed on people's discarded food scraps.’
      • ‘The skim milk and household food scraps were fed to the pigs.’
      • ‘After their adventure, the piglets will be relaxing at Divernagh and feasting on pig meal and scraps until they are re-housed.’
      • ‘The preferred dish for festivals, guinea pigs, are often raised in the house and provide a productive use for kitchen scraps and discarded food.’
      • ‘The secret is to keep the henhouse moving and not to leave uneaten scraps around at the end of the day.’
      • ‘His perfect amber-colored eyes widened nervously, hopefully, like a frightened animal begging for scraps.’
      • ‘Remember, baits will only be effective if there is no other accessible food around, for example dirty dishes, food scraps.’
      • ‘Municipal wastes include basic household wastes such as papers, cans, bottles, food scraps, and other debris typically generated by households.’
      • ‘Soft-drink and beer cans, food wrappers and scraps, incense sticks and general debris were evident after these sessions.’
      • ‘Table scraps and human food can lead to excess weight that is a detriment to your dog's overall health.’
      • ‘From our experience, the process may take up to two weeks, and adding fresh food scraps to the new bin will encourage the migration.’
      • ‘The bears had found leftover meat scraps by the beach.’
      • ‘All year long I lug a small green compost bucket full of leftover scraps, carrot peels, tea leaves, and dead flowers out to the compost bin behind our shed.’
      leftovers, uneaten food, leavings, crumbs, scrapings, slops, dregs, scourings, offscourings, remains, remnants, residue, odds and ends, bits and pieces, bits and bobs
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Used to emphasize the lack or smallness of something.
      ‘there was not a scrap of aggression in him’
      ‘every scrap of green land is up for grabs by development’
      • ‘He is a hard worker, a decent bloke, cautious to the core, a mediator, a facilitator and without a scrap of charisma, a boring, grating speaker and bad orator.’
      • ‘This is not to disparage the editor and her magazine, it's just that I can't ever see a day when such a read would hold even a scrap of appeal.’
      • ‘I have a bondsman who is willing to post $1 million bond without a scrap of collateral because he tells me that there is no risk that he would run.’
      • ‘There it is all written up and there's not a scrap of evidence for it.’
      • ‘All around was ruin - then bizarrely they found a scrap of comfort.’
      • ‘No amount of festive tips on the perfect table centrepiece or how to wrap an awkwardly-shaped present will make a scrap of difference.’
      • ‘It is a pity that he didn't think of that when he accused the IRA, without a scrap of evidence being presented, of carrying out the Northern bank robbery.’
      • ‘He said: ‘There was not a scrap of salt on the road - it was like a skating rink and really treacherous.’’
      • ‘The truth is, whatever happens in the Tampa case alone won't make a scrap of difference to whether or not boatpeople come in the future.’
      • ‘The only drawback to this eminently plausible case is that there is not a scrap of evidence for it.’
      • ‘You can add bold text, you can italicize text and you can drop in nicely formatted block quotes without having to know a scrap of HTML.’
      • ‘So you have an ethics officer in a department or corporation, but no one will take a scrap of notice of them.’
      • ‘It's a good thing it doesn't rain much here as it was in perfect condition - not a scrap of rust.’
      • ‘Whatever your fee, take the money and run but don't expect your words of wisdom to make a scrap of difference to our council.’
      • ‘Since I don't know a scrap of javascript I can only try and resolve it by trial and error - which of course is my favourite way to learn.’
      • ‘Without a scrap of make-up, the chocolate-box prettiness is still there: the clear turquoise eyes, creamy skin and chiselled bone structure are luminous.’
      • ‘If I remember correctly from my antediluvian youth, he's in there right now endlessly combing his hair but it won't make a scrap of difference.’
      • ‘Then looking down the rest of this year's list, I realise that - Kanye West aside - there's scarcely a scrap of rap to be found.’
      • ‘There isn't a scrap of evidence that race had anything to do with it.’
      • ‘And if that sentence makes a scrap of sense then it's more than it deserves.’
    3. 1.3informal A small person or animal, especially one regarded with affection or sympathy.
      ‘poor little scrap, she's too hot in that coat’
      • ‘She first spotted him asleep on the floor of an orphanage, a tiny scrap dressed only in a T-shirt.’
    4. 1.4 A particularly small thing of its kind.
      ‘she was wearing a short black skirt and a tiny scrap of a top’
      • ‘Maybe that's why everyone has taken the news to heart - she's such a scrap of a thing that we greet her illness not unlike the wounding of a tiny bird.’
      • ‘Is he referring to the big part where they're growing opium and selling it for weapons, or the tiny scrap our guy holds with a lot of help from our guns?’
  • 2Discarded metal for reprocessing.

    ‘the steamer was eventually sold for scrap’
    • ‘Speer said he was unaware that soldiers were searching landfills for scrap metal and discarded glass.’
    • ‘He's built all the instruments out of scrap metal - the guitars, the drums, everything.’
    • ‘Other companies take scrap metal and melt it down for use in lowgrade metal products like garden furniture and sign posts.’
    • ‘It established that the parents had left the house to search abandoned factories for scrap metal that they could sell.’
    • ‘Thieves are taking the cables because of their copper wires, which can be sold as scrap metal on the open market.’
    • ‘More common were the homes built from pallets and scrap metal, and in some cases from empty plastic bottles.’
    • ‘He survived by selling scrap metal he scrounged from construction sites for 60 cents per kilo.’
    • ‘In 1942 he made his first sculptures - constructions of wire and scrap metal.’
    • ‘The port deals mainly in bulk cargo such as timber, steel scrap, building materials, cereals and fertilisers.’
    • ‘If all else fails, the cylinders can be recycled as scrap metal at your local metal yard.’
    • ‘It is feared the bronze ducks may be melted and sold as scrap metal.’
    • ‘Undaunted, he used his welding skills to sculpt an emu from scrap metal and when it sold for £200 he was launched on a new career.’
    • ‘The people of Mayo and the North West will soon be able to conveniently dispose of their scrap metal.’
    • ‘When the flying boat works closed down, they had dumped a load of rubbish and scrap metal in the deepest part of the lake.’
    • ‘During that year, he says, his unit helped collect about 500 tons of scrap metal and bulldozed it into 21 pits.’
    • ‘He once worked night shift as a security guard, then went straight to a day shift in a car salesroom and sold scrap metal on the side.’
    • ‘Even though the value of scrap metal is currently high, motorists can no longer expect to be paid for their worn-out vehicles.’
    • ‘Thieves are obviously stealing the grates and selling them for scrap metal, which is bought by the kilogram.’
    • ‘Poverty drives people to search for scrap metal, and instead they find unexploded ordnance.’
    • ‘The situation has largely come about, apparently, because of a substantial drop in the value of scrap metal.’
    1. 2.1often as modifier Any waste articles or discarded material, especially that which can be put to another purpose.
      ‘we're burning scrap lumber’
      • ‘He kept scrap cars and other waste on land near York for years, against regulations, York magistrates heard.’
      • ‘I built a worktable out of scrap material and let both our children participate in its construction.’
      • ‘He picked up the accumulated scrap rails and switch material on his way in during the fall.’
      • ‘The first is that reusing the scrap glass saves the cost of raw materials.’
      • ‘Salvagable scrap materials from the ship will also be stripped and sold.’
      • ‘We used scrap pieces of recycled plastic lumber for our rot strips, secured with counter-sunk screws.’
      • ‘Over 900 mould fragments, 250 crucible sherds, as well as waste products, scrap metalwork, tools and raw materials were recovered.’
      • ‘The authority aims to use a high percentage of recycled materials, including scrap tiles from the tile yards at Barton.’
      • ‘‘The event also involved sleeping outside in a ‘refugee camp’ built out of scrap materials.’’
      • ‘We stop at the shelving where the scrap fiberglass is kept waiting to be used as storage doors.’
      • ‘I showed them our pile of scrap lumber and told them they could have whatever they wanted if they'd build a fort with it.’
      • ‘A cold frame in a sunny corner uses no resources except scrap lumber and an old window frame.’
      • ‘Once you find out they don't fit as planned, prepare to wedge some scrap pieces of material to fill the gaps.’
      • ‘Make a super sturdy one with some old building blocks, or raid your dad's work bench for pieces of scrap wood.’
      • ‘All three projects can be easily and inexpensively made in a matter of hours from a few scrap sheets of plywood.’
      • ‘Adding to the damage is the ever-worsening shortage of international raw materials like scrap iron and wheat, one of main factors causing inflation.’
      • ‘You can also create shelters using old flowerpots or scrap lumber that appeal to toads, bees, and bats.’
      • ‘Major raw material is scrap steel which is abundantly available with Indian Railways.’
      • ‘We have worked with a lot of scrap materials, which we have now painted up.’
      • ‘The charity wants to get more children involved in recycling and using scrap materials to encourage environmental awareness.’
      waste, refuse, garbage, rubbish, litter, discarded matter, debris, detritus, dross
      View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Discard or remove from service (a retired, old, or inoperative vehicle, vessel, or machine), especially so as to convert it to scrap metal.

    ‘the decision was made to scrap the entire fleet’
    • ‘Owners then have seven days to pay before their car is scrapped.’
    • ‘While the country needs international help to scrap its nuclear submarines, a newly minted Russian billionaire can pay a huge sum for an English soccer team.’
    • ‘That envisaged more than 2,000 stations, thousands of passenger services and a third of a million freight wagons being scrapped.’
    • ‘Under the ‘last owner pays’ scheme, car owners will have to pay between £50 and £100 to scrap their vehicles.’
    • ‘I have found after discussions with the dealer that a lot of these old machines are scrapped and thrown out as a profit can no longer be made from them.’
    • ‘A year earlier a start had been made on dismantling the batteries, and seventeen electric cabs were scrapped.’
    • ‘It seems there is no end to boats being scrapped, with yet another vessel being taken out of the Kilkeel fleet.’
    • ‘Changes that will see 28,000 fishermen lose their jobs and 8,600 vessels being scrapped have been unveiled by the European Commission.’
    • ‘Most of the machines were scrapped but some did survive to enjoy the benefits of the Warbird movement.’
    • ‘Fishermen who want to trade up and buy a bigger boat usually scrap their existing vessel and buy extra tonnage from the market.’
    • ‘Eventually, this will damage the engine: but if you're going to scrap the car within a year or two, does that matter?’
    • ‘My daughter's laptop screen has gone dim and she has been told to scrap the machine because it is old.’
    • ‘New and safer taxis will also be introduced, as unsafe vehicles are scrapped.’
    • ‘Before the van was scrapped, the engineer-in-training removed some components.’
    • ‘The one-dimensional approach of the Commission's proposals in terms of retraining fishermen and scrapping vessels will destroy fishing communities.’
    • ‘We would appeal to people not to scrap these cars.’
    • ‘Already skippers are applying in droves to scrap their boats for cash, and 15 per cent of the fleet in Grimsby has been successful in applying for decommissioning.’
    • ‘At the beginning of the year 2000 UK oil giants seemed poised to scrap the boats and replace them with helicopters.’
    • ‘The pay and display machines were scrapped following the opening of a new car park further away on the south side of the abbey.’
    • ‘They might be able to make repairs and renovations, or they might be able to scrap this ship and get a different model.’
    1. 1.1 Abolish or cancel (something, especially a plan, policy, or law) that is now regarded as unnecessary, unwanted, or unsuitable.
      ‘the station scrapped plans to televise the contest live’
      • ‘The new man in Bute House has already purged his Cabinet and now he's scrapping his predecessor's policy agenda.’
      • ‘Plans to scrap laws which allow parents and patients to sue for billions of pounds worth of compensation were being unveiled by the Tories today.’
      • ‘Campaigning by the RMT rail union has forced the government to drop plans to scrap tube safety regulations.’
      • ‘Pupils of a Richmond secondary school are protesting after a streaming policy was scrapped by their new headteacher.’
      • ‘Tariffs on cars will be reduced and in some cases scrapped, while dairy producers are hoping to increase their share of exports significantly in the short-term.’
      • ‘In Sheffield, where the limits on cabs were scrapped in 1998, the number of taxis rose from 300 to 457 in 2003.’
      • ‘Thankfully, these plans were quickly scrapped.’
      • ‘The Local Government Bill published yesterday also scraps the plans to directly elect mayors of county and city councils.’
      • ‘‘They scrapped their plans last week,’ said a senior industry source.’
      • ‘The police force is to scrap a controversial policy which prevented officers from pursuing criminals in dangerous high-speed car chases.’
      • ‘It has scrapped plans for speed bumps in Waldegrave Road and is proposing instead an enforced 20 mph zone.’
      • ‘New Delhi should have also announced that all cases relating to POTA would lapse once the law is scrapped.’
      • ‘Taking into account the new reality, it is considering scrapping its policy that says the country should be able to fight two major wars simultaneously.’
      • ‘Should restrictions on the number of cabs be scrapped?’
      • ‘Passengers who were expecting to fly buzz routes in April will have to abandon their plans as its new owner Ryanair plans to scrap the schedule.’
      • ‘The Council, which owns the car park over the road used by many customers, has now scrapped the refund policy.’
      • ‘Both men pledged that scrapping London's £5 traffic congestion charge, which comes into force today, would be a priority for whoever was picked.’
      • ‘He said the company had scrapped plans to apply for extended licensing hours and a public entertainment licence.’
      • ‘The plan was scrapped in 2001 after planning wrangles.’
      • ‘The MTA is already scrapping plans to buy new subway cars and buses, and will put several major station-upgrade projects on hold.’
      • ‘Council leaders have denied they are downgrading the fight against crime by scrapping a dedicated community safety portfolio.’
      • ‘Of course, scrapping the need-blind policy is not the sole option.’
      • ‘Cumbrian gamekeepers and stalkers have embraced Government plans to scrap archaic laws stopping the sale of game all year round.’
      throw away, throw out, dispose of, get rid of, do away with, toss out, throw on the scrapheap, clear out, discard, remove, dispense with, lose, eliminate, dump, bin, jettison, shed, dismiss, expel, eject, weed out, root out
      abandon, drop, abolish, withdraw, throw out, do away with, give up, stop, put an end to, cancel, eliminate, cut, jettison
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (as a plural noun denoting fragments of uneaten food): from Old Norse skrap ‘scraps’; related to skrapa ‘to scrape’. The verb dates from the late 19th century.

Pronunciation

scrap

/skrap//skræp/

Main definitions of scrap in English

: scrap1scrap2

scrap2

noun

informal
  • A fight or quarrel, especially a minor or spontaneous one.

    • ‘He wasn't a man to back away from a scrap when he was a player, and he said he wouldn't this time.’
    • ‘Yet my memories of schooldays are littered with scraps, challenges and gang battles.’
    • ‘You see in most of my fights I love a scrap, and he just caught me off guards.’
    • ‘This week, his battle with Jets LT Jason Fabini will resemble a backyard scrap between a couple of pit bulls.’
    • ‘Suddenly, he is in the equivalent of a street scrap, a grim battle against the odds.’
    • ‘‘On days like this you have to play the elements as well as the opposition, which is why it was a bit of a scrap and fight,’ said the manager.’
    • ‘They were inclined to lose the head, and there were often altercations and scraps going on as speeches were being delivered.’
    • ‘They love a good scrap and they are a people famous for their inter-clan feuds and savage mountain guerrilla techniques.’
    • ‘Next month will see the launch of a game which lets users re-write history and win the battle of Hastings or other such momentous scraps.’
    • ‘The grand final rematch was a defensive scrap with Thornlie showing great resilience to fight back to win by a goal.’
    • ‘Fights, scuffles, and scraps have a long history in playgrounds, schools, pubs, clubs, and workplaces.’
    • ‘In my days scuffles and scraps were just that, a few drunken punches thrown and nothing else, but these days everyone seems to be carrying knives.’
    • ‘This is a chance for their players to escape from the relentless pressure of a relegation scrap and revel in the media attention that this tie will attract.’
    • ‘It wasn't long before I was having a tussle with a pike, which gave me a great scrap.’
    • ‘At his unhappiest when forced into a scrap, O'Sullivan fought back to go in at the interval all square, but his poor form continued and Henry claimed a deserved win.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, a scrap between Presto and Stocker on personality would be a fight between unarmed men.’
    • ‘I knew it would be a battle and a scrap but we have won 2-0 and I would have settled for that before the game.’
    • ‘Are relegation scraps far more interesting than clashes of the top-of-the-table titans?’
    • ‘The Koreans are controlling this game, winning the scraps in midfield and releasing the ball first time to feet.’
    • ‘At the end of a minor classic of a scrap, the judges could barely separate the two fighters.’
    quarrel, argument, row, fight, disagreement, difference of opinion, dissension, falling-out, dispute, disputation, contention, squabble, contretemps, clash, altercation, exchange, brawl, tussle, conflict, affray, war of words, shouting match, fracas, wrangle, tangle, misunderstanding, passage at arms, passage of arms, battle royal
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]informal
  • 1Engage in a minor fight or quarrel.

    • ‘Why is it that every time the phone rings my dogs start scrapping and making a racket so I can't hear what is being said?’
    • ‘She does not just fight, she scraps, battles and will not lie down.’
    • ‘As he has grown, we have argued and scrapped like siblings.’
    • ‘‘That's mine,’ they bark furiously, scrapping over a dusty elastic band discovered on the pavement.’
    • ‘He's not the kind of person who scraps with other people.’
    • ‘It turns out that it was BNP officials he was scrapping with.’
    • ‘Maybe it was because Nicole and Adam were scrapping all the time - the engagement's off.’
    • ‘What's amazing about this story is that the crowd stood and watched the police scrapping with the offender.’
    • ‘There are two girls scrapping over something trivial.’
    • ‘One newspaper cartoon had Scottish ballet audiences scrapping in the aisles.’
    • ‘The Liberal Democrats, who claim growing support for their ‘fairer’ local income tax alternative, were delighted to see their rivals scrapping.’
    • ‘At 6-foot-7 and 250 pounds, the giant enjoys giving his team momentum boosts by scrapping with defenders.’
    • ‘In fact, the colony of 3,000 seals is pupping now: weaning their fluffy young, scrapping with their sisters and chasing off marauding bulls keen to get them pregnant again.’
    • ‘‘They're always scrapping,’ said his mum Susan.’
    • ‘He keeps scrapping with his bookies' goons and tries to get a loan, but nothing's working out.’
    • ‘His daughter and his ex scrapped in front of the crowd leading granny to faint at the service.’
    quarrel, argue, have a fight, have a row, row, fight, disagree, fail to agree, differ, be at odds, have a misunderstanding, be at variance, fall out, dispute, squabble, brawl, bicker, chop logic, spar, wrangle, bandy words, cross swords, lock horns, be at each other's throats, be at loggerheads
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Compete fiercely.
      ‘the talk-show producers are scrapping for similar audiences’
      • ‘Every time the cameras panned into the breakdown, he was there, scrapping for possession.’
      • ‘Frankly, they'll both be awesome this year - lots of competitive fast bikes scrapping for wins.’
      • ‘Everybody's trying to get a win and you can't blame them for scrapping to get one,’ he said.’
      • ‘Confirmation of Webber's move will trigger another frenzy of deal-making as drivers scrap for the last few available places on the grid.’
      • ‘This middle section of the season is a time for doggedness and fight, a time to scrap for whatever points you can grasp.’
      • ‘Symons said: ‘We played some good football at times and we are scrapping for our lives.’’
      • ‘They are just riddled with contradiction and dispute amongst themselves, scrapping as they do to try to gain power.’
      • ‘They spend years trying to get a research program off the ground, scrapping for grant money, and fighting with ornery referees to get their research published.’
      • ‘After going 2-0 up, we should now be comfortable for the top six but it now looks as though we will be scrapping all the way.’
      • ‘The teams know they are going to have to fight and scrap for everything so they are still battling in the 93rd or 94th minute.’
      • ‘If Nigeria lose this game they will be out of the competition and England, Sweden and Argentina will be scrapping over two places up for grabs in the second round.’
      • ‘We could easily have been scrapping for points at the bottom of the table with Carlisle.’
      • ‘Trailing 11-3 at the interval, the youngsters scrapped with every sinew before finally falling 14-11.’
      • ‘The better spectacle may prove to be half the division scrapping to avoid relegation rather than the nip and tuck which will signify the top.’
      • ‘City must scrap and fight for every point between now and the end of the season.’
      • ‘A blogger has to fight and scrap and scrape every day, every post, for each and every reader.’
      • ‘Inevitably, though, the increased production means everyone will be scrapping for profits as competition heats up.’

Origin

Late 17th century (as a noun in the sense ‘sinister plot, scheme’): perhaps from the noun scrape.

Pronunciation

scrap

/skrap//skræp/