Main definitions of scout in English

: scout1scout2

scout1

noun

  • 1A soldier or other person sent out ahead of a main force so as to gather information about the enemy's position, strength, or movements.

    • ‘The scouts gathered the information they wanted without any excitement, just like the first trip, and turned onto a road that would take them out of town.’
    • ‘Collection efforts of the RSTA squadron and infantry battalion scouts should be complementary.’
    • ‘With both reconnaissance scouts dead, Theorton grabbed the assault rifle of one and ducked behind the nearest boulder in sight.’
    • ‘In response, he began sending his advance scouts further afield as they drew closer to the enemy.’
    • ‘The surviving M3 tank, along with the scouts, began movement back to the main body of the 45th Infantry.’
    • ‘A scout ahead of the main group gave Seth the final signal that the men were ready to detonate the charges, by reflecting the sun in a piece of glass.’
    • ‘Just then, the scouts he had sent ahead, came running back.’
    • ‘They were to get behind enemy lines and act as scouts and gather intelligence to feed back to British military headquarters.’
    • ‘Then, Spetnaz troops and scouts were sent ahead of the armor to eliminate RPG-armed snipers.’
    • ‘When scouts reported a river ahead, the army dissolved into a mob and ran for it.’
    • ‘Now we have sent one of the village's best scouts to gather further information, so that our village will be prepared for an attack.’
    • ‘Because they have night vision capabilities, the snipers can track and engage several enemy scouts during training.’
    • ‘Some units deploy their scouts forward, while others do not.’
    • ‘Four days had passed before Lord Light ordered his force to a halt, and sent scouts out ahead to find the disposition of the bridge.’
    • ‘The Indian scouts attached to Custer's overland force were among the best in the Montana and Wyoming area.’
    • ‘Gadi sent ahead five scouts and they all came back with reports.’
    • ‘Many Native soldiers were used as reconnaissance scouts and snipers and were very effective at their craft and won much acclaim for their deeds.’
    • ‘Advance scouts rode ahead into the darkness, but the enemy seemed to have withdrawn.’
    • ‘From here General Custer sent scouts out to ascertain the strength and locality of the enemy.’
    • ‘As the soldiers leapt from the boats, Rhia watched them move quickly up the beach, taking up position, sending advance scouts.’
    lookout, lookout man, lookout woman, outrider, advance guard, vanguard, spy
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A ship or aircraft employed for reconnaissance, especially a small fast aircraft.
      • ‘We sent a picket ship as a scout, your government destroyed half of it, and stole all the remains.’
      • ‘The Germans had developed some new techniques - one of which was to have several layers of scouts flying in close formation, one on top of another.’
      • ‘There are thirty fighters, two scouts, ten bombers, and three long range fighters.’
      • ‘The insignia depicted the head of an Indian scout wearing a helmet peering through a cloud, signifying the squadron's role as an aerial scout for the Army.’
      • ‘It can direct close air support missions, act as a killer scout on the battlefield and help protect friendly troops.’
      • ‘Of course, that suggestion had been shot down faster than a Spectral scout.’
      • ‘We will also see a significant increase in the number of scouts to man UA reconnaissance formations.’
    2. 1.2
      short for talent scout
      • ‘Speaking of Ohio State, college rivalries are getting under the skin of some NFL college and regional scouts.’
      • ‘Udrih is a good ballhandler who impressed scouts with his shooting and play off the pick-and-roll.’
      • ‘Colclough showed improvement throughout the practice week, though he might not be as fast as some scouts thought he was.’
      • ‘While his arm strength is considered good, Rodgers threw the ball downfield twice in the four games the scout watched.’
      • ‘NBA scouts will watch him very attentively this season.’
      • ‘I knew the Brandeis shortstop had some scouts looking at him.’
      • ‘Did any club scout take any snaps of our activities this year?’
      • ‘When scouts study a college cornerback, they look for the potential to play safety.’
      • ‘Clubs employ scouts who work their whole lives to unearth such gems, so why are they then treated so casually?’
      • ‘An effective scout operates like a detective, working hotel lobbies and press boxes to glean information about players.’
      • ‘Yes, she is on the Wade Trophy watch list and WNBA scouts have been flocking to her games, but she has virtually no name in the national press.’
      • ‘The 21-year-old Bradford Park Avenue striker was spotted by a college scout while he was a student at East Durham Football Academy.’
      • ‘He has it all which is why major league scouts consider him to be the best all-around player in the game.’
      • ‘And no matter how difficult it may be to discover a future superstar, the scouts are determined to search the globe until they find him.’
      • ‘He remained in the Russian League, playing with Dynamo in Moscow, until Sharks scout John Ferguson saw him while on a scouting mission.’
      • ‘And in the estimation of one rival scout, the Cubs ‘didn't give up much of anything.’’
      • ‘I had winter track coming up and I really needed to be in good shape, this was the year that all of the college scouts would be looking at me.’
      • ‘Mornington were so successful that league clubs sent scouts to watch a number of the players.’
      • ‘I had scouts come and watch me play my junior year.’
      • ‘My eligibility is hanging by a thread and tons of college basketball scouts are starting to show up.’
    3. 1.3[usually in singular]An instance of gathering information, especially by reconnoitering an area.
      ‘I returned from a lengthy scout around the area’
      • ‘He fancied a scout round Victoria but I told him I preferred Wapping instead.’
      • ‘I want to have a quick scout round.’
      • ‘With a preliminary scout of the area and a sketch map, we were someway nearer as to understanding where everything was in relation to each other.’
  • 2A Boy Scout or Girl Scout.

    • ‘He was first bitten by the climbing bug as a 10-year-old scout.’
    • ‘An organization called Scouting for All was cofounded by a young heterosexual scout named Steven Cozza and his father, Scott Cozza.’
    • ‘Despite these odds, any good scout knows the value of being prepared, and it only makes sense to select a folding knife for daily carry with the capacity for defensive use in mind.’
    • ‘Bowling newspaper publisher Dan McDonough, also a Boy Scout official, tells about the two scouts who went bowling for the first time.’
    • ‘Former eagle scout Clint Lawton stopped pursuing a business major when he learned that Brigham Young University offered a new major: Scouting.’
    • ‘The scouts applied for the program and each Girl Scout council could recommend only one girl.’
  • 3dated, informal A man or boy.

    ‘I've got nothing against Harrison—he's a good scout’
  • 4A domestic worker at a college at Oxford University.

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Make a search for someone or something in various places.

    ‘I was sent to scout around for a place to park the camper’
    ‘we scouted for clues’
    • ‘Hadman intends to scout around this weekend to establish the extent of the crisis.’
    • ‘This also gets your foot in the door so you can scout around their home to see if they have any additional art or framing needs that your business could meet.’
    • ‘Lexi asked about this as they scouted for any wild dogs that might ruin their hunt.’
    • ‘I'm going to scout around for a while and make sure there aren't any thieves.’
    • ‘Do you remember back in March we asked you to scout around at home for any old mobile phones and printer cartridges to recycle?’
    • ‘‘It has all meant that we had to scout around for players to fill the gaps and it's not an easy task,’ he said.’
    • ‘He scouted for a new location and found the 28-acre Napier Garden facility ideal for the purpose.’
    • ‘Hawaiian ecologists have long scouted for invading brown tree snakes, which occasionally stow away on planes landing in Honolulu.’
    • ‘I was five minutes early so I scouted for a good spot on the beach.’
    • ‘Under the watchful eyes of promoters and fans, she moved nimbly around semifinal competitor Stephanie Thomas and scouted for an opening.’
    • ‘He scouted for legal jobs in Washington, DC but received no offers.’
    • ‘I scouted for evidence of a stuck or injured fox, but found nothing.’
    • ‘In fact, that was the Congress' Achilles heel as it scouted for more supporters.’
    • ‘Once our three years is up, we scout around for the best deal and re-mortgage again, if necessary.’
    • ‘It's time for you to pack your bags and scout for another job!’
    • ‘I scouted for a spot, realizing in vast horror the only place open was next to Uncle Al.’
    • ‘Head to the market for tiny gourds and bunches of berries or scout in the backyard for some shapely branches with character.’
    • ‘The policy should simplify the funding process for film-makers who previously had to scout around for money from various departments project by project.’
    • ‘Observe the effectiveness of transgenic hybrids and insecticide control methods and learn how to dig roots and scout for rootworm larvae.’
    • ‘Some newly seeded stands may be hurt if not scouted for leafhoppers.’
    search, look, hunt, cast about, cast around, cast round, ferret, ferret about, ferret around, root about, root around
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(especially of a soldier) go ahead of a main force so as to gather information about an enemy's position, strength, or movements.
      • ‘The men are sent out on patrol to scout out the enemy position.’
      • ‘Clement halted his army and signaled for his scout to ride ahead of the army to scout for enemies ahead.’
      • ‘We were only about 3 km outside the roadblocks around the Forêt but were not detected by enemy patrols scouting widely throughout the area.’
      • ‘As fire burned from where the bunkers once stood, Joe's remaining troops went ahead to scout for any enemy forces left.’
      • ‘I have several teams of men out scouting for information that might lead us to him.’
      • ‘Born on a Cherokee reservation, Threepersons scouted for Gen. Blackjack Pershing on his expedition after Pancho Villa in 1916.’
      • ‘Quickly flicking the C stick down will activate the gadget, and it often comes in quite handy while scouting for enemy soldiers.’
      • ‘One of the posthumous VCs, with another rifleman, was scouting ahead of a strong fighting patrol.’
      • ‘The Federal forces at Helena in the summer of 1862 did little more than scout within a forty - to fifty-mile radius of the river city.’
      • ‘Slaves helped Unionists evade conscription, and both groups spied and scouted for Federal troops.’
      • ‘In addition the crusaders used light cavalry and horse archers in large numbers to harass the enemy, to scout, and to supplement the knights.’
    2. 1.2[with object]Explore or examine (a place or area of business) so as to gather information about it.
      ‘American companies are keen to scout out business opportunities’
      • ‘I'd scouted the area last month and found two possibilities.’
      • ‘Last year, I scouted this photo location near Griffith Park.’
      • ‘First, it developed an unmanned small helicopter to scout dangerous terrain.’
      • ‘The airline is scouting new areas for market expansion in the region and has singled out St Lucia.’
      • ‘The project is now scouting summit sites in areas with large exoffender populations and plans to hold five summits by the end of 2005.’
      • ‘When you are scouting an area, a GPS is the perfect tool for mapping and relocating roosting areas and routes.’
      • ‘Wilmer found and fell in love with his studio, a former warehouse, on his first day scouting business space in Sausalito.’
      • ‘The screenwriter is expected to deliver a first draft of the script this month, about the time Donner will be scouting locations in France.’
      • ‘He has spent the week down in Nicaragua, scouting real estate investment possibilities.’
      • ‘Producers should scout fields and determine if the action threshold has been exceeded.’
      • ‘Those on foot will be in the middle with some more experienced rangers ahead of us scouting out the land.’
      • ‘He looked down to the town below them, nervously scouting the streets for a sign of the men they had seen last night.’
      • ‘He had scouted the place the previous evening in preparation for today's shoot.’
      • ‘Putting that aside, I scouted the room for people I knew, slightly reassured to see Jane.’
      • ‘Schools are proposed to grant high-tech degrees while businessmen scout various ports to set up shore-based facilities.’
      • ‘We will actually scout a place many times, checking it out in the daytime and night-time.’
      • ‘There was a dispute over what to do in the morning - scout out the surrounding area, or put everyone to work building a settlement.’
      • ‘There were three of us who left the field together and scouted the park for we had never seen it empty.’
      • ‘Once an enterprising hornet scouts out a bee colony, it marks the nest with a type of bodily chemical substance called a pheromone.’
      • ‘Although specimens have occasionally been found here, I have not thoroughly scouted this area, and a more extensive investigation could be productive.’
    3. 1.3Look for suitably talented people for recruitment to one's own organization or sports team.
      ‘Johnson has been scouting for the Pirates’
      • ‘He chose to scout some of the team's top minor leaguers rather than attend the World Series.’
      • ‘All 16 drivers have been selected through the Red Bull Driver Search Programme, which scouts out young talent from all corners of the globe.’
      • ‘If Missouri loses a great prospect or two because other teams are scouting and making living-room pitches, the impact will linger.’
      • ‘After his playing days were over, he fanned in Iowa, and scouted for the White Sox.’
      • ‘That made NBA teams a little wary of him, especially teams that want to scout in China.’
      • ‘At the same time, they'll be scouting out potential talent for their live music venues.’
      • ‘It's a decision Kindler makes based on the talent he scouts at the festival.’
      • ‘The music director spoke of his keen interest in programmes that scouted for new voices.’
      • ‘I'm not sure if he's scouting future talent or having a little professorial fun with us.’
      • ‘He scouted for the Pirates from 1950 to 1988, and then for the Astros for five more years.’
      • ‘After spending the last three years scouting for clubs in the Football League, Roscrow has amassed a vast knowledge of the non-league scene.’
      • ‘The team says it scouted both pitchers heavily.’
      • ‘In his final year of junior hockey and still a free agent, several NHL teams have scouted him and he hopes to get an NHL tryout next fall.’
      • ‘He also scouted for the Pirates and recommended the drafting of Roberto Clemente.’
      • ‘The idea is not to scout for talented cricketers for the Indian women's team but to make women come out of their homes and play the game.’
      • ‘There are many people from outside the U.S. involved in scouting or evaluating talent all over the world.’
      • ‘He also scouted for the Padres and Angels, and served an executive stint with the Oakland A's after the 1982 season.’
      • ‘At one time, the team was scouting top cornerbacks.’
      • ‘In his retirement he lived in Dorset where - as a keen football fan - he scouted for Bournemouth and Dorchester football clubs.’
      • ‘Bush scouted for the Oilers from 1987 through 1991 then coached the teams' linebackers from 1992 through 1994.’

Phrases

  • scout's honor

    • 1The oath taken by a Boy Scout or Girl Scout.

      1. 1.1informal Used to indicate that one has the same honorable standards associated with Scouts and so will stand by a promise or tell the truth.
        • ‘‘Okay, I won't do anything irrational,’ I said as I lifted up my hands, put up my first two fingers and folded the rest back,‘Scout's honour.’’
        • ‘I'll be there tomorrow night, Scout's honor!’
        • ‘He'll watch his mouth next time, Scout's honor.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb): from Old French escouter listen earlier ascolter, from Latin auscultare.

Pronunciation:

scout

/skout/

Main definitions of scout in English

: scout1scout2

scout2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]rare
  • Reject (a proposal or idea) with scorn.

    • ‘Despite her tender letters to her guru, he sensibly scouts the idea that the two were lovers.’

Origin

Early 17th century: of Scandinavian origin; compare with Old Norse skúta, skúti a taunt.

Pronunciation:

scout

/skout/