Main definitions of scotch in English

: Scotch1scotch2scotch3

Scotch1

adjective

  • old-fashioned term for Scottish
    • ‘Elsewhere the dialogue recovers and proves capable of poking a little borax at the rigid principles and habits of Scotch piety.’
    • ‘We don't specify Scotch beef on our menus because that is what our clients expect when they eat with us and that is what they get.’
    • ‘Five round tables covered with Scotch plaid cloths occupy most of the space.’
    • ‘Shoppers are being duped into buying foreign meat which has been inaccurately labelled as Scotch beef, farmers' leaders have claimed.’
    • ‘Finlay quotes her remark: ‘Scotch air, Scotch people, Scotch hills, Scotch rivers, Scotch woods are all preferable to those of any other nation in the world.’’

noun

  • 1

    short for Scotch whisky
    • ‘In the same way that a previous generation explored and experimented with single malt Scotch, today's consumers are learning about tequilas and mezcals.’
    • ‘He fumbled with the lock on the door to his apartment, looking forward to a stiff shot of single-malt Scotch before fixing dinner.’
    • ‘He demanded a great deal of money, complete privacy, a limo to transport him to and from the meeting and a bottle of the best single malt Scotch at each session.’
    • ‘While this style represents less than 10% of all Scotch sold in the U.S., it has been gaining popularity over the past decade.’
    • ‘‘While some might think this dessert is normally made with Scotch, the traditional recipe is actually brown sugar, milk and butter,’ says Short.’
  • 2as plural noun the Scotchdated The people of Scotland.

    • ‘He died in the Orkney Islands while returning from an expedition against the Scotch.’
  • 3dated The form of English spoken in Scotland.

Usage

The use of Scotch to mean ‘of or relating to Scotland or its people’ is disliked by many Scottish people and is now uncommon in modern English. It survives in a number of fixed expressions, such as Scotch broth and Scotch whisky. For more details, see Scottish

Origin

Late 16th century: contraction of Scottish.

Pronunciation

Scotch

/skɑtʃ//skäCH/

Main definitions of scotch in English

: Scotch1scotch2scotch3

scotch2

verb

  • 1with object Decisively put an end to.

    ‘a spokesman has scotched the rumors’
    • ‘Credit rating agency Standard and Poors has scotched claims that the economy has bottomed out and recovery is imminent.’
    • ‘So there was a possibility that Italy could even tilt the balance in the final, but Brazil scotched all hopes with an excellent display.’
    • ‘However, a recent article scotches this by putting the position of UK manufacturing in context.’
    • ‘The government should have scotched this one immediately or announced the appointment.’
    • ‘The journalist suggests that his investigation may have been what scotched the Kerik nomination.’
    • ‘The high command had decided to launch the invasion on the 5th of June, but bad weather had scotched that date.’
    • ‘Even meditation hasn't managed to scotch his burning desire for fame, glamour and ‘loads of money’.’
    • ‘The records showed his plan had been scotched by a hail of objections from all four of our adjoining neighbours - plus, it seemed, one other mystery objector.’
    • ‘He scotched all such fears with a breezy and fluent effort.’
    • ‘The old charisma is back and all those rumours of flab injections can be scotched once and for all - until the next time.’
    • ‘History teaches us that unless these pernicious tendencies are scotched, they grow to become unmanageable monsters later on.’
    • ‘It was because of this settlement that my original article was eventually scotched - there being no further story to write.’
    • ‘He is anxious to continue to represent Laois in the Dáil, and tries to scotch the widely held view that he is a shoo-in for a seat.’
    • ‘The EU has scotched the name the company had planned for the unbundled versions of its operating system that it must ship in Europe as result of last year's antitrust decree.’
    • ‘At Monday's Civic Centre Committee meeting, the Councillor said rumours needed to be scotched.’
    • ‘The US quickly stepped in to scotch any such plan.’
    • ‘Rumours of a publicity ruse have not entirely been scotched.’
    • ‘Communicate frankly and regularly with your people; scotch wild stories before they get started.’
    • ‘The Fish and Wildlife Service manipulated data so protection for panthers could be scotched.’
    • ‘Merchandising and media deals have been scotched because the comic book seemed to be skewing ‘too adult.’’
    put an end to, put a stop to, bring to an end, nip in the bud, put the lid on
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic Render (something regarded as dangerous) temporarily harmless.
      ‘feudal power in France was scotched, though far from killed’
      • ‘Shortly afterwards, I saw the same man on television pronouncing that the leader's brilliant speech would scotch the conspirators.’
  • 2with object and adverbial Wedge (someone or something) somewhere.

    ‘he soon scotched himself against a wall’
    1. 2.1archaic Prevent (a wheel or other rolling object) from moving or slipping by placing a wedge underneath.

noun

archaic
  • A wedge placed under a wheel or other rolling object to prevent it moving or slipping.

Origin

Early 17th century (as a noun): of unknown origin; perhaps related to skate. The sense ‘render temporarily harmless’ is based on an emendation of Shakespeare's Macbeth iii. ii. 13 as ‘We have scotch'd the snake, not kill'd it’, originally understood as a use of scotch; the sense ‘put an end to’ (early 19th century) results from the influence on this of the notion of wedging or blocking something so as to render it inoperative.

Pronunciation

scotch

/skäCH//skɑtʃ/

Main definitions of scotch in English

: Scotch1scotch2scotch3

scotch3

verb

[WITH OBJECT]archaic
  • Cut or score the skin or surface of.

noun

archaic
  • A cut or score in skin or another surface.

Origin

Late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

scotch

/skäCH//skɑtʃ/