Definition of scold in English:

scold

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Remonstrate with or rebuke (someone) angrily.

    ‘Mom took Anna away, scolding her for her bad behavior’
    • ‘I silently scolded Leah for being so careless and went to turn it off.’
    • ‘I scold him just before he brings the lighter to the tip.’
    • ‘Likewise, if one scolds a person too much, then he can't handle things well as expected.’
    • ‘During Geometry classes they talked non-stop and were scolded by the teacher from time to time about their excessive talking.’
    • ‘"Friends, not cronies, " her mom scolded lightly.’
    • ‘The cow, forgetting about me for the moment, turned, purple with fury, to scold the person in question.’
    • ‘Children are rarely scolded, though rowdiness is sometimes criticized.’
    • ‘"I don't know why you've gone and told me all this, " the woman scolded angrily.’
    • ‘I mentally scolded myself for being so foolish, for getting so carried away.’
    • ‘My daughter will scold me if I swear in front of her though, so she's keeping me in line.’
    • ‘His wife was shaking a customer's hand and laughing graciously, before gently scolding the children.’
    • ‘I was surprised not to hear my mother's voice scolding the maid.’
    • ‘With his hands on his hips, he looked like a mother scolding a child.’
    • ‘"Yeah, pretty boy, I got that, " she lightly scolded.’
    • ‘He is scolding his daughter for not turning up to school.’
    • ‘"Oh shush, " his mother scolded him before pointing at his food.’
    • ‘My mother was usually present too, and I remember her soft voice always gently reprimanding me for being too rough, or quietly scolding my sister for complaining too much.’
    • ‘"Leave her alone, Georgina, " my father had scolded my mother.’
    • ‘My father scolded me and instead told Holly to just take her time deciding.’
    • ‘I remember two years ago when I was scolded by three teachers in school.’
    rebuke, reprimand, reproach, reprove, admonish, remonstrate with, chastise, chide, upbraid, berate, take to task, pull up, castigate, lambaste, read someone the riot act, give someone a piece of one's mind, go on at, haul over the coals, criticize, censure
    tell off, give someone a talking-to, give someone a telling-off, dress down, give someone a dressing-down, give someone an earful, give someone a roasting, give someone a rocket, give someone a rollicking, rap, rap over the knuckles, slap someone's wrist, let someone have it, send someone away with a flea in their ear, bawl out, give someone hell, come down on, blow up, pitch into, lay into, lace into, give someone a caning, put on the mat, slap down, blast, rag, keelhaul
    tick off, have a go at, carpet, monster, give someone a mouthful, tear someone off a strip, give someone what for, give someone some stick, wig, give someone a wigging, give someone a row, row
    chew out, ream out, take to the woodshed
    bollock, give someone a bollocking
    chew someone's ass, ream someone's ass
    call down, rate, give someone a rating, trim
    rebuke, reprimand, reproach, reproof, admonishment, admonition, reproval, remonstration, lecture, upbraiding, castigation, lambasting, criticism, censure
    telling-off, rap, rap over the knuckles, dressing-down, earful, roasting, bawling-out, caning, blast, row
    ticking off, carpeting, rollicking, wigging
    bollocking
    rating
    reprehend, objurgate
    View synonyms

noun

US
Archaic
  • A woman who nags or grumbles constantly.

    • ‘These scolds may defy common sense, but they're still worthy of attention because they represent the consensus among the profession's elite.’
    • ‘Surely, they must be the most uncomfortable garment ever invented, this side of a scold's bridle.’
    • ‘It may not be as bad as some lifestyle scolds make it out to be.’
    • ‘The Taming of the Shrew recalls a tradition of stories about scolds.’
    • ‘Yet people short on money often neglect the advice of the professional scolds and instead turn to the damnable moneylenders.’
    nag, nagger, shrew, fishwife, harpy, termagant, harridan
    complainer, moaner, grumbler, fault-finder, carper
    kvetch
    targe
    xanthippe
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (as a noun): probably from Old Norse skáld skald.

Pronunciation:

scold

/skōld/