Definition of scholarly in English:

scholarly

adjective

  • 1Involving or relating to serious academic study.

    ‘scholarly journals’
    ‘a scholarly career’
    • ‘Few if any of the serious scholarly treatments of the Cold War and its end credit a single policy or factor or agent.’
    • ‘After he arrived on campus, now thirty-five and still single, he began to scout out new scholarly topics.’
    • ‘The problem for Australian academic historians is that scholarly publishing is virtually non-existent.’
    • ‘He is the author of several books and has written several articles in scholarly journals in his field.’
    • ‘His life as well as his scholarly studies have greatly enriched the field of American economic history.’
    • ‘As the largest and most dangerous of all sixteenth-century English rebellions, these events have already received much scholarly attention.’
    • ‘Yet despite their profusion and evident popularity these figures have received little scholarly attention.’
    • ‘I've written a fair number of articles in both policy and scholarly journals.’
    • ‘At this point, online scholarly publishing is pursuing two economic models - commercial and open access.’
    • ‘There is no paucity of scholarly studies and statistical data on China, but these do not help us.’
    • ‘His articles and case studies on these topics have appeared in numerous scholarly journals and books.’
    • ‘Johnson's study continues the important scholarly work of correcting this misreading.’
    • ‘But scholarly studies on the pre-independence history of Indian diplomacy are too few.’
    • ‘The society combines the scholarly study of local speech with the publication of prose and poetry in various forms of local dialect.’
    • ‘By the 1990s, the scholarly literature on implementation had ballooned to immense proportions.’
    • ‘Try to do better at blogging about new scholarly work in political science that connects to real-world events.’
    • ‘It is the task of a scholarly journal to provide a platform for many interesting lines of discussion and analysis.’
    • ‘Most scholarly journals do not pay authors, and many actually impose page charges on scientists who contribute.’
    • ‘But most of their commentaries are irrelevant to serious scholarly discourse.’
    • ‘The reverse is true - as scholarly research indicates, and as I have found empirically.’
    academic, educational, scholastic, professorial, pedagogic, pedagogical
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Having or showing knowledge, learning, or devotion to academic pursuits.
      ‘a scholarly account of the period’
      ‘an earnest, scholarly man’
      • ‘His own education was scholarly and he could read Latin and was familiar with the classics.’
      • ‘This excellent study is scholarly, clearly written, informative, and provocative.’
      • ‘The British, the author of this scholarly and objective study concludes, lost both the will and the ability to rule by force.’
      • ‘What such an account would not reveal is how far this scholarly passion for translation actually influenced cultural practice on a wider scale.’
      • ‘Such scholarly collaboration would not have looked good in literary accounts of embassies.’
      • ‘Erudite and scholarly, Green was best known for his literary achievements.’
      • ‘Here, the music press and music journalism in daily newspapers form the basis of scholarly accounts of works of highly variable scope.’
      • ‘On the other hand, they are too disjointed and brief to contribute much to the knowledge of more scholarly fans.’
      • ‘Multi-lingual, he liked to retire with a book, was well-polished in letters and enjoyed scholarly debate.’
      • ‘The authors are to be congratulated on this scholarly study, which must have been a labour of love.’
      • ‘It is good to have this learned and scholarly life back in circulation.’
      • ‘Yet they do not mean that there would be no intelligible reality outside our scholarly discourses.’

Pronunciation:

scholarly

/ˈskälərlē/