Definition of scallop in US English:

scallop

noun

  • 1An edible bivalve mollusk with a ribbed fan-shaped shell. Scallops swim by rapidly opening and closing the shell valves.

    Family Pectinidae: Chlamys, Pecten, and other genera

    • ‘The chemical, marketed under the name Calicide, acts by preventing the formation of chitin, a key component of the sea-louse's exoskeleton, but also important in the life cycles of scallops, mussels and lobsters.’
    • ‘The types of seafood they eat include mussels, scallops, clams, crabs, lobsters, abalone, and sea urchins.’
    • ‘To clean the scallops, prise the shells open with a knife, scraping and loosening from the flat shell.’
    • ‘Remove the scallops from their shells and discard the ‘skirts’, leaving only the white meat and orange roe.’
    • ‘Bivalves like oysters, mussels and scallops are particularly prone to contamination because of the way they feed.’
    • ‘There are the usual oysters, crab, shrimp, scallops, mussels, fish and just about any other edible sea creature you can think of are all there, plus some prime cuts of beef and a few chicken dishes.’
    • ‘Always buy fresh live scallops with closed shells and make sure you use them within a day or so.’
    • ‘From there, it is into the clams, cockles, mussels and scallops.’
    • ‘I also caught some terakihi, another good eating fish and that evening Hayden made a chowder with fish, crayfish, scallops and mussels.’
    • ‘There was Marco in grimy apron plating up, or opening scallops, looking every inch the piratical hero, with his long black hair and sunken eyes and high cheek bones, surrendered long ago to his new-found affluence.’
    • ‘For the scallops: remove from shell, clean and cut in half lengthways.’
    • ‘But this time they're sweet tiny Taylor Bay whole scallops, reminiscent of clams, with prettier shells.’
    • ‘However, crab, scallops, clams and mussels in various east coast hamlets are also being explored.’
    • ‘Calicide acts by preventing the formation of chitin, a key component in the sea louse's exoskeleton, but also important in the life-cycles of mussels and snails, scallops, worms, crabs and lobsters.’
    • ‘If you are unsure about how to cut open a scallop or sea urchin, fillet a brill or clean an octopus, just ask your local fishmonger to do it for you.’
    • ‘Remove the scallops from their shells by gently scraping and prising them away with a blunt knife, leaving on the roe (alternatively, ask your fishmonger to do this for you).’
    • ‘Once in a while I grabbed scallops, sea urchins, and lobster.’
    • ‘After you have shelled and trimmed scallops, give them a good wash in sparkling water for a few seconds.’
    • ‘We take his word that we are eating shark, conch, shrimp, scallops and mussels and are relieved we can't afford more.’
    • ‘Or perhaps we appreciate how incredibly easy it is to do ourselves: simply wedge in a sharp knife against the flat edge and take it straight across, so that you scrape the scallop off the shell.’
    1. 1.1
      short for scallop shell
      • ‘Here the interior is inlaid with millions of beautiful shells, scallops, paloudres, clams, periwinkles, mussels, oysters and rogans.’
    2. 1.2 A small pan or dish shaped like a scallop shell and used for baking or serving food.
  • 2usually scallopsEach of a series of convex rounded projections forming an ornamental edging cut in material or worked in lace or knitting in imitation of the edge of a scallop shell.

    • ‘Leafcutter ants cut neat scallop shapes out of leaves, which they carry home to their underground colonies.’
    • ‘Texture also was featured in crepe knits embellished with dimensional scallops and two-tone jacquards with sheer blisters on an opaque ground.’
    • ‘For very wide windows… you may have 6 or more scallops.’
    • ‘A white drawing on black paper depicts from various angles a school of the menacing fairy-tale creatures, variously ornamented with stripes, scallops and spikes.’
    • ‘It turned out to be a bit of a chicken night for me as the curry was chicken too, but it was a very tasty plateful and the chips were cut like big scallops and were nice and crispy around the edges.’
    • ‘Stitch four scallops and gather the ribbon very tightly, creating four distinct petals.’
    • ‘Finally, chairs with a scallop crest and sharply projecting ends, may have been a style peculiar to the Newbury region.’
    • ‘Place the scallop pattern along the foldline and transfer the scallops to the fabric.’
    • ‘The first was a lovely little 41/4 inch bronze chariot plane with dovetailed steel sole extended at the front and file decorated with scallops and cusps.’
    • ‘Retrace the scallops as many times as necessary to ring the room.’
    • ‘European axes at the most might have wide scallops filed on the edge of the blade plate on the inside or bottom of the beard, and that is not common.’
    • ‘Marks eliminated some of the dated look just by removing the wooden window scallop and replacing the knobs with metal handles.’
  • 3

    another term for escalope

verb

  • 1usually as adjective scallopedwith object Ornament (an edge or material) with scallops.

    ‘a scalloped V-shaped neckline’
    • ‘At the front, large tapering light covers flank a steeply rising, scalloped bonnet that features a central crease line.’
    • ‘They're made from shiny gold bars, which feature a delicate, scalloped, satin gold border.’
    • ‘I thought his pink confetti tweed skirt suit with an understated floral embroidered scalloped hem was right on the money.’
    • ‘One great suggestion is using metallic braid ribbon with scalloped edges to spruce up plain metal votives.’
    • ‘Hidden beneath a tender and delicious paillard of veal is a cake of brilliantly creamy scalloped potatoes, crusted with a golden gratin of Asiago.’
    • ‘The sheets, pillow cases and shams are highlighted by the double line of satin stitch embroidery along the outlines and the hems of the sheets are scalloped for extra detail.’
    • ‘The soft scalloped edges, oversized dimensions, and embossed details of these high quality, highly functional serving pieces set them apart and provide long-lasting style.’
    • ‘Remove the top of a one-quart jug and then scallop the edge with scissors.’
    • ‘I spot it on a banister: the glossy silks of its opened fan, each edge scalloped.’
    • ‘In typical Islamic style, scalloped arches access encircling verandahs, stretch in cool symmetry down corridors leading to the actual tombs.’
    • ‘I found myself admiring the beautifully scalloped collar of a jacket, the gently flowing lines of a very feminine blouse, the outrageous burst of color of a certain scarf, the delicacy of a sterling silver pin.’
    • ‘Their yellow hue is picked up in the scalloped edges of the stockings, tailored from matelasse pillow shams.’
    • ‘Raised above street level, a large, sloping concrete platform with a scalloped edge is covered with earth, vegetation and fragments of stone structures, including walls and a roofless cottage.’
    • ‘I chose to put sand colored scalloped concrete border edgers against the outside pool edge and now only the lip shows on top.’
    • ‘I want you to do the edge, do a nice little scalloped edge all around.’
    • ‘Most of the postcards date from the first half of the 20th century and are of the popular hand-tinted type with scalloped edges.’
    • ‘It does not rest on the stone table: the foremost scalloped edge of the platform dips below the straight edge of the table, and the base of the platform is not rendered visible.’
    • ‘Anyway, I'm a real sucker for scalloped edges, and this little project is just zipping along.’
    • ‘Soon we served up steaming helpings of scalloped potatoes, chicken breasts and gravy onto our plates, and ate hungrily.’
    • ‘It was narcissism at its peak, but there was relevance to the German designer's strict tailoring, with peaked shoulders and scalloped hems giving jackets a feminine edge.’
    • ‘Add details by layering shapes over the base paper, use paper punches and scalloped scrapbooking scissors to add style, use a gold calligraphy pen to add names.’
    • ‘The silver lace trim needed to line the underside of the rabbet so that the scalloped edge would peak out onto the backing board.’
    1. 1.1 Cut, shape, or arrange in the form of a scallop shell.
      ‘he leaned against the scalloped seat of the limousine’
      • ‘Some of the prettier varieties of summer squash, such as the Yellow Custard Squash, with its flat, scalloped shape, are among the numerous cultivars which can be dried and used for decoration.’
      • ‘Light pink sheer fabric was scalloped between the posts on my bed.’
      • ‘Mitted cats have evenly matched and scalloped white mittens on their front legs.’
      • ‘The distinctive shape, with prominently scalloped rim, recalls contemporary European silver forms, specifically bleeding, or barber's bowls.’
      • ‘The spurred yellow-green buds rise, then burst open above 2-to 3-foot pillows of deeply scalloped blue-green foliage.’
      • ‘He sat down on the edge of a flame duct scalloped out of the concrete pad, feeling the sun-heated wall against his calves as his legs dangled, the chain scraping between them.’
      • ‘A scalloped, cloverleaf shape lends plenty of character to this Charlestown Square table (above left) from Broyhill.’
      • ‘After our eyes adjust, we find the walls to be a gorgeous translucent blue, the surface scalloped into smooth, symmetrical wavelets.’
      • ‘This floppy two-foot-tall member of the mint family has scalloped, lemon-scented leaves that make a soothing evening tea and add body to blends as well.’
      notch, nick, make an indentation in, make nicks in, make notches in, serrate, pink, cut, scratch, gash, slit, snick, gouge, groove, furrow, dent
      View synonyms
  • 2usually as noun scallopingNorth American no object Gather or dredge for scallops.

    • ‘And in the unlikely event that you get bored with counting portholes, you can always go scalloping - the seabed is alive with them!’
  • 3with object Bake with milk or a sauce.

    ‘scalloped potatoes’
    • ‘Although the celebration will be as muted as a saxophone full of scalloped potatoes considering his dismal last place finish in a field of two.’
    • ‘Add extra cheese to scalloped potatoes or macaroni and cheese; order extra cheese on pizza.’
    • ‘They're equally at home with ham, lamb, and such cheese-rich side dishes as scalloped potatoes.’
    • ‘Terese grinned at her, and scooped some of Rowena's mother's mashed potatoes next to the scalloped ones on her plate.’
    • ‘And a square of lightly scalloped white potatoes layered with sweet potatoes is pleasantly understated.’
    • ‘These start with a poached egg on puff pastry, followed by melt-in-your-mouth herbed salmon, and then a thick slice of roast beef in gravy accompanied by scalloped potatoes.’
    • ‘‘Took you long enough,’ she muttered and handed him a bowl of scalloped potatoes.’
    • ‘However, the side of scalloped potatoes was creamy and excellent and there was a generous portion of steamed vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, beans, shredded carrots, peas) that made it feel like a holiday dinner.’
    • ‘The girls had been up all night cooking macaroni and cheese, scalloped potatoes and stewed pork.’
    • ‘Over scalloped potatoes and roast beef, Gabriella's favourite meal, Elaine's mother asked, ‘So, James, what do you do for a living?’’
    • ‘The main course was going to be a roast duck, served with cranberry stuffing and scalloped potatoes.’
    • ‘‘They should be glad I am not writing about the food,’ smiled Miller after sampling the herb-encrusted halibut with fennel sauce, scalloped potatoes and asparagus.’
    • ‘Maybe I can finally get the recipe for those amazing scalloped potatoes she made for your reception.’
    • ‘Even her lunches were the subject of coverage, from her failed quest to find a breadless turkey sandwich at the courthouse cafeteria to yesterday's court-provided meal of chicken and scalloped potatoes.’
    • ‘Snap up the scalloped potatoes or the garlic mashed potatoes if you see them on the hot table, too.’

Origin

Middle English: shortening of Old French escalope, probably of Germanic origin. The verb dates from the mid 18th century.

Pronunciation