Definition of savor in English:

savor

(British savour)

verb

  • 1with object Taste (good food or drink) and enjoy it completely.

    ‘gourmets will want to savor our game specialties’
    • ‘The holiday season is also a time for me to savor foods I might not have the chance to any other time of the year, so, of course, I must make sure my taste buds remember them long after the holidays are over!’
    • ‘Immediately, we devoured our food, savoring the taste.’
    • ‘She ate it slowly, savoring each morsel of food that went in her mouth.’
    • ‘Olsson took a bite, savoring the ham and cheese on wheat.’
    • ‘I took a quick drink and savored the taste I that I hadn't had in a while.’
    • ‘I could have sat there all day, savouring a pasta salad and watching the people coming out.’
    • ‘Ignoring the question, he took an obstinate bite of cheese and slowly chewed it, savoring the food with exaggerated relish.’
    • ‘Slow down your eating, savor your food, and enjoy sharing life with family and friends.’
    • ‘Both routes of feeding were physically unnatural and all I wanted was that exhilarating feeling of smelling, tasting and savouring food in my mouth again.’
    • ‘Do not gulp down your food; savor each mouthful and chew well before you swallow.’
    • ‘He taps her glass with a ringing clink and starts to drink the champagne, savoring the taste.’
    • ‘It's not just about slow cooking and careful preparation of food, but also about slow eating: to savour the different tastes, to eat carefully, and convivially.’
    • ‘Make sure you savour food - cooking shouldn't be a hassle or a trial.’
    • ‘He has dinner and actually savors the wine, rather than drinking to get drunk.’
    • ‘The movement promotes homemade, handmade food, biodiversity, sustainability - and, above all, taking the time to savor good food at the table.’
    • ‘Teach children to chew food more slowly and savour the food.’
    • ‘I lifted my beer bottle to my face and drank the frothy goodness, sipping it slowly, savoring the bitter crisp taste.’
    • ‘Eric walked out from the kitchen and grinned, sitting down and slowly savoring his chocolate pudding.’
    • ‘Sometimes you get drawn into food and silence falls as each mouthful is savoured.’
    • ‘Those on-board enjoyed the new, lavish dining room, savoring excellent cuisine and first-class service.’
    1. 1.1 Enjoy or appreciate (something pleasant) completely, especially by dwelling on it.
      ‘I wanted to savor every moment’
      • ‘I was meant to be savouring the last moments of my precious long weekend, but instead I find myself wishing that time would fast forward itself and just let me go to school.’
      • ‘From restaurant menus to new lifestyle trends, savoring the moment has become the rule.’
      • ‘Let us enjoy her tennis, savour her exploits and respect and appreciate her talents.’
      • ‘What follows is Nick living the last days of his life to the fullest, savoring each moment and doing things he had only dreamed of.’
      • ‘As he wanted to stay a moment and savour the scene, he leaned against the thick trunk of the sturdy oak behind him.’
      • ‘You try to live life to the fullest, savouring every moment, for you never know what the morrow may bring - or if there will be a morrow for you.’
      • ‘He grinned and flipped open his notebook, obviously savouring the moment before he dropped the bombshell of what kind of trouble I was in.’
      • ‘As for herself, she is going to make sure she savours every moment.’
      • ‘Yet still we lingered, savoring the last moments of the magical afternoon.’
      • ‘He sits down with his family for a meal, savoring the moment.’
      • ‘I read your columns every week and savor every last morsel.’
      • ‘While it runs long at over three hours, every moment is to be savoured.’
      • ‘I pulled him closer, savouring every moment I could, just being there in his arms.’
      • ‘Sloan breathed deep, enjoying and savoring the moment.’
      • ‘He smirked joyously, savouring every moment of my suffering.’
      • ‘Now she was enjoying herself and savoring every moment of climbing back up.’
      • ‘Slowly he leaned forward, sweaty palms tucked into his jeans' pockets, not wanting to rush this moment, savouring this anticipatory thrill.’
      • ‘Ever so slightly and slowly, they lent in and kissed each other on the lips softly, savouring the moment in each other's arms.’
      • ‘If life were like a rented DVD, you'd be able to fast-forward through the dull bits and hit slow-motion or pause to savour the sweeter moments.’
      • ‘He seemed to be savouring every last moment that he had in this place.’
      relish, enjoy, enjoy to the full, taste to the full, appreciate, delight in, take pleasure in, revel in, smack one's lips over, luxuriate in, bask in, drool over
      View synonyms
  • 2savor ofno object Have a suggestion or trace of (something, especially something bad)

    ‘their genuflections savored of superstition and popery’
    • ‘This whole debate tends to savour of Western self-indulgence - all that powder and shot being used in this ultimately silly battle when there are other things going on that really matter.’
    • ‘The whole lecture has a morally subversive ring, and the savour of antinomianism about it.’
    • ‘That would savour of something like treachery, a kind of anti-supporting of your own team.’
    • ‘A reform that is Catholic in spirit will seek to maintain communion with the whole body of the Church, and will avoid anything savoring of schism or factionalism.’
    • ‘Curwen's Act of 1809 making it illegal to sell seats in parliament was passed at a time of so-called Tory dislike of anything savouring of reform.’
    • ‘But England take the log of dropped catches to seven, most savouring of insufficient concentration rather than inadequate technique, of players contemplating their second innings rather than Australia's.’
    • ‘Too much liberty of this kind savours of a luxuriant ungovernable fancy and borders on enthusiasm.’
    • ‘I cannot accept these submissions which I have to say on occasions seemed to me to savour of semantics.’
    • ‘Reviving the spirit of Dada, Fluxus was fervently opposed to artistic tradition and to everything that savoured of professionalism in the arts.’
    • ‘The promise of endless variety savours of sameness, and we blame ourselves for being spoilt or ignorant, unimaginative, ungrateful and unfulfilled.’
    • ‘All that is connoted by the adjective ‘carnal ‘is the very reverse, and savors of that which is ‘earthly, sensual, devilish.’’
    suggest, smack of, have the hallmarks of, have all the signs of, give the impression of, seem like, have the air of, have a suggestion of, be indicative of, hint at, have overtones of
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A characteristic taste, flavor, or smell, especially a pleasant one.

    ‘the subtle savor of wood smoke’
    • ‘What's needed is a flesh whose savour runs deep because its fats are dispersed, in fine grains, throughout the meat.’
    • ‘It has the addictive Hebridean savour of a peaty-iodiney island malt.’
    • ‘Nothing spoils the savour of a good wine or takes the zing out of a gin and tonic like having it served in a smeary, bleary glass.’
    • ‘The notes of nut and marmalade add great savour to rashers and crispy black pudding.’
    • ‘A spoon of wood or plastic leaves the savor intact.’
    • ‘Their salted and smoked meat was useful to give savour to otherwise stodgy dishes, and was especially important for the poor.’
    • ‘The octopus was tender and tangy, with a savour of the sea.’
    taste, flavour, tang, smack
    piquancy, interest, attraction, fascination, flavour, spice, zest, excitement, enjoyment, joy
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A suggestion or trace, typically of something bad.
      • ‘It has the savor of disease about it and you immediately wonder what sort of agenda lies behind it.’
      • ‘The air had a metallic savour and my throat suddenly went dry.’
      • ‘His casualness irritated Adriana; it had the savor of a deliberate affront.’
      trace, hint, suggestion, touch, smack
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from Latin sapor, from sapere ‘to taste’.

Pronunciation

savor

/ˈseɪvər//ˈsāvər/