Main definitions of sake in English

: sake1sake2

sake1

noun

  • 1For the purpose of; in the interest of; in order to achieve or preserve.

    ‘the couple moved to the coast for the sake of her health’
    ‘for safety's sake, photographers are obliged to stand behind police lines’
    ‘let us say, for the sake of argument, that the plotter and the assassin are one and the same person’
    • ‘Neither wanted to show their ugly sides by building an alliance for the sake of political interests.’
    • ‘For the sake of preserving the costume, none of it was cut as the alterations were made.’
    • ‘The society is now saying the show is pushing back the boundaries of animal safety for the sake of entertainment.’
    • ‘The other day, I saw a TV ad asking locals to buy quality firecrackers for the sake of safety.’
    • ‘Realistically, however, a line must be drawn under the amendments at some point for the sake of achieving the deal.’
    • ‘Please, for the sake of Australia's future, the Labor Party should unconditionally support the free trade agreement and do it no later than tomorrow.’
    • ‘But, for the sake of the health of individuals and the safety of communities, it has to be done.’
    • ‘At least certain parts of the city need to be preserved for the sake of posterity.’
    • ‘It is our hope that the president will make a wise decision for the sake of national interests.’
    • ‘It's fantastic that Peter's gone to this great effort for the sake of Africa.’
    cause, purpose, reason, aim, end, objective, object, goal, motive
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Used to indicate something that is done as an end in itself rather than to achieve some other purpose.
      ‘new ideas amount to change for change's sake’
      • ‘In their view art education should be championed for its own sake, not because of a wishful sentiment that classes in painting, dance and music improve pupils' math and reading skills and standardized test scores.’
      • ‘But education for its own sake is a bit dodgy, too. The idea that you can learn about the world sitting in your study just reading books is not quite right.’
  • 2Out of consideration for or in order to help someone.

    ‘I felt I couldn't give up, for my own sake or the baby's’
    ‘I have to make an effort for John's sake’
    • ‘Well just for my sake, could I please check your coats so that I could just make sure you guys don't have anything?’
    • ‘Seriously, though, you can't let that loser ex-boyfriend (and I hope for your sake that he's an ex) ruin your faith in the opposite sex.’
    • ‘Pupils already spend a limited time at school, and, therefore, teachers should never consider striking for their sake.’
    • ‘But she made an effort to smile, for Dave 's sake.’
    • ‘If you see anything suspicious, please, for your sake, tell me immediately.’
    • ‘Please, for my sake, do not expose yourself to danger.’
    • ‘If you don't do this for your sake, at least do it for mine, please?’
    • ‘He'd find it funny, or at least make an effort and smile for my sake.’
    • ‘But I'm just telling you, for your sake, I hope circumstances change and you can find a better job!’
    • ‘Maybe I can't understand it because I haven't grown up with it, but for the children 's sake, you should live with each other.’
    benefit, advantage, good, well-being, welfare, interest, gain, profit
    View synonyms
  • 3Used to express impatience, annoyance, urgency, or desperation.

    ‘“Oh, for God's sake!” snarled Dyson’
    ‘where did you get it, for heaven's sake?’
    • ‘But if you have to ride into town on such an old horse, for heaven's sake, ride it properly - or at least teach the poor beast a few new tricks.’
    • ‘Hail him for the success, castigate him for his failures but, for heaven's sake, do not bring religion into sport.’
    • ‘We have been led with ‘highly reputable macro economists’ and, for heaven's sake, look where we are now.’
    • ‘Impatient mothers began urging their charges to finish up, for heaven's sake, so they could get dressed.’
    • ‘He interviewed me, much to my mortification - people want him, not me for heaven's sake, but he knew what he was doing.’
    • ‘If you have depression in your family, for heaven's sake, just talk about it in a straightforward way.’
    • ‘But how complicated can they make voting sound, for heaven's sake?’
    • ‘How much gadgetry does one person need, for heaven's sake?’
    • ‘But this is a terrorist organisation, for heaven's sake, which all decent people should shun, if not actively fight.’
    • ‘But for heaven's sake, let's not intellectualise an endeavour that reeks of commerce and commodification.’

Phrases

  • for old times' sake

    • In memory of former times; in acknowledgment of a shared past.

      ‘they sat in the back seats for old times' sake’
      • ‘If you think I'm romanticising, look at the success of Friends Reunited among people who want to exchange e-mails for old times' sake.’
      • ‘I know, I know - you couldn't possibly agree, but Kerr is here for old times' sake, for nostalgic and sentimental reasons.’
      • ‘Completely obsolete at the moment, but if you insist, I'll do it for old times' sake.’
      • ‘He has also handed in his training permit as well, though he may take the old boy to some point-to-point meetings just for old times' sake.’
      • ‘What makes you think I wouldn't help some friends for old times' sake?’
      • ‘Perhaps it was for old times' sake and to recall fond memories - like the night I watched my wife playing hold'em: She held a king-high straight flush against a man who held the bottom end of the straight flush, queen-high.’
      • ‘Even when electricity and central heating systems have made it unnecessary to rely on wood fires for warmth and light, many countries in the Northern hemisphere ensure that there is a symbolic fire in the grate, just for old times' sake.’
      • ‘The 30-odd bullock cart owners in the city live on the charity of a few traders in the Chalai market who hire them just for old times' sake.’
      • ‘Eddie Wilson, 84, of Askam-in-Furness, and Ken Barnett, 83, from Swindon, will be enjoying a pint together in the West Country for old times' sake after 59 years apart.’
      • ‘Hell, I'll meet you in a San Diego bar and we'll all have a drink for old times' sake.’

Origin

Old English sacu contention, crime of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zaak and German Sache, from a base meaning affair, legal action, thing The phrase for the sake of may be from Old Norse.

Main definitions of sake in English

: sake1sake2

sake2

(also saki, saké)

noun

  • A Japanese alcoholic drink made from fermented rice, traditionally drunk warm in small porcelain cups.

    saki
    • ‘Commonly called sake outside of Japan, nihonshu or sake (note that "sake" is also the general Japanese term for alcohol) is brewed using rice, water and white koji mold as the main ingredients.’
    • ‘When you drink with others, it's a Japanese etiquette to pour sake into each other's cup. You should hold your cup up when someone is serving sake to you.’
    • ‘Shiru-Bay also has a great selection of cold and hot sakes and Martinis.’

Origin

Japanese.