Main definitions of sage in English

: sage1sage2

sage1

noun

  • 1An aromatic plant with grayish-green leaves that are used as a culinary herb, native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean.

    • ‘We've got hawthorn, gingko, elder, mullein, lavender, sage, thyme, echinacea, borage, yarrow and plenty of pine trees.’
    • ‘Sheri's houseplants go for about $5 each, while her herbs like oregano, sage and thyme are $4.’
    • ‘Perhaps it's because it isn't a classic culinary herb like basil or sage, or maybe because its medicinal values are limited.’
    • ‘You also can plant lavender, oregano, thyme, rosemary and sage.’
    • ‘Plants deer especially dislike include catmint, chives, lavender, sage, spearmint, thyme and yarrow-all useful and easy to grow in this area.’
    • ‘Good choices to plant now are basil, chives, cilantro, oregano, parsley rosemary, sage, and thyme.’
    • ‘Herbs like borage, sage and hyssop are excellent food sources for these beneficial insects, so they could be planted in the flower borders to prevent pests like greenfly from damaging other plants in the border.’
    • ‘In a sunny window, try oregano, rosemary, sage, sweet marjoram, and thyme.’
    • ‘Thyme, oregano, rosemary, sage, basil and coriander all contain high levels of phyto-chemicals, which can help ward off heart disease and cancers.’
    • ‘She was told that lavender and culinary sage wouldn't grow here.’
    • ‘Thyme, sage, rosemary, oregano are all found here.’
    • ‘Other culinary herbs, like sage, rosemary and thyme, are native to Mediterranean regions where the air is rather temperate and dry.’
    • ‘Herb de Provence is a mixture of herbs, often including thyme, rosemary, tarragon, chervil, sage, marjoram, basil and fennel seed.’
    • ‘The best culinary sage is native to southern Europe.’
    • ‘There is nothing better than having fresh herbs on hand for cooking and marjoram, thyme, sage, chives, rosemary, parsley and basil will all thrive on a windowsill.’
    • ‘Not only are they aromatic and in season most of the year, but there is nothing better than having fresh thyme, rosemary, sage, parsley, coriander and chives at your fingertips.’
    • ‘I use thyme, sage, rosemary, chives, basil, dill, sorrel, salad burnet, chervil, oregano and mint as well as parsley.’
    • ‘Cover a berm with low-growing aromatic herbs such as basil, prostrate rosemary, sage, and lemon and lime thyme.’
    • ‘Mediterranean herbs such as sage (salvia officianalis) are hardy and tasty plants.’
    • ‘And, the culinary herb, sage, that you use in the kitchen is often enough to put a damper on hot flashes.’
    1. 1.1Used in names of aromatic plants of the mint family that resemble sage, e.g., wood sage.
      • ‘In our southern California garden Mexican sage thrives so well that we bind it with twine so it grows up where the hummingbirds get to it easier.’
      • ‘Wood sage will do well in full sun or light shade.’
  • 2Either of two bushy North American plants with silvery-gray leaves.

    • ‘Vivid pink roses lead the eye through the border, while butterfly bush, Mexican sage, and penstemon add bursts of soft purple blooms here and there.’
    • ‘The most common shrubs are creosote bush, ocotillo, and bur sage.’
    • ‘The tepees, the yoga kiva, the pre-massage ritual of burning sage to ward off evil spirits - are all nods to an ancient way of life.’
    • ‘The talks sitting by the pool, lying on a Mexican blanket in front of the candle altar, burning white sage in an abalone shell for hours all reiterated the feeling that I was home.’
    • ‘He rode horseback through rolling hills of silver sage.’
    • ‘Attract hummingbirds by planting Mexican bush sage, pineapple sage, and beebalm.’
    • ‘One of my friends, who was some-part Cherokee, told me the Native Americans use white sage to purify themselves and their homes of any negative spirits.’
    • ‘This area is lightly vegetated with juniper, pine, sage, and grasses.’
    • ‘For instance, you could always grab some white sage and burn it in each room, paying particular attention to doors, windows and any corners where ‘spirits’ might hang out.’
    • ‘Cleveland and white sage, creosote bush and brittlebush, pine and redwood, for instance, are filled with resins and release their scents on warm afternoons.’
    • ‘Mexican bush sage grows 3 to 4 feet tall and bears velvety purple flower spikes from early- or midsummer into winter, or until a cold snap shuts them down.’
    • ‘Topical oils or hair products containing eucalyptus and sage will help heal a head that's been damaged by overprocessing.’
    • ‘At some sweat lodges sage and cedar are thought to purify the space, while tobacco leaves bless the earth.’
    • ‘The mountain tops are wild, but the valley bottom is filled with cottonwood trees, purple sage and wild geranium, and riverside paths meander away to waterfalls and pools.’
    • ‘And over there is some Creosote Bush, Shadscale, Big Sagebrush, Bladder sage, and Blackbush.’
  • 3

    short for sagebrush

Origin

Middle English: from Old French sauge, from Latin salvia healing plant from salvus safe.

Pronunciation:

sage

/sāj/

Main definitions of sage in English

: sage1sage2

sage2

noun

  • A profoundly wise man, especially one who features in ancient history or legend.

    • ‘As a young materialist it mattered to me that we too have our ancient texts, our saints and sages, wise men and good news.’
    • ‘Sen Tetsu So Dan: the first two characters mean a great thinker, a wise man, a sage in ancient times, while the third means a group, or a collection.’
    • ‘The wisdom of great sages of antiquity comes to us mainly through the aural tradition, and so has almost certainly suffered distortion through intermediaries.’
    • ‘The sages who advise the party leader on these matters are turning their attention to his deputy.’
    • ‘Kashmir was a holy land for us, where our yogis and sages prayed and meditated and many of our Hindu people went on pilgrimages.’
    • ‘Ancient tribal leaders and sages of the day sought to find answers.’
    • ‘Well, many sages and wise men over the years have recommended the mountain top.’
    • ‘It has its source in the experience handed down by the sages of ancient China, followers of Taoism philosophy.’
    • ‘Actually, mythology was only set up by ancient sages to help explain the very complicated Hindu philosophy in an unphilosophical way.’
    • ‘According to ancient legends, 90 million sages lived, worshiped and meditated at this place.’
    • ‘But they forget the kind of tapas, intense spiritual disciplines, which were done by those ancient sages.’
    • ‘When calling on the Gurukkal, don't expect to meet a venerable sage with wrinkles to testify the years of experience he had in life.’
    • ‘I want children to grow up under the influence of the wisdom of the ancient sages.’
    • ‘One of our ancient sages was so blown away by the concept that he declared charity to be equal in importance to all the other commandments combined.’
    • ‘Just as the ancient sages can't be blamed for the ideology of the Sangh Parivar, the actions of these so-called leaders cannot be traced to the Sikh values.’
    • ‘Right from ancient times, sages and seers have been preaching that money alone should not be the aim in life, for it could never bring contentment.’
    • ‘Like ancient sages, the pundits pore over the details of Gordon Brown's speech and the related Budget documents as if they were holy texts.’
    • ‘Rulers, in his view, should be subject to higher laws, devised by the ancient sages Confucius and Mencius and administered by learned mandarins.’
    • ‘His insistence on winning through non-violence is no less a feat than the great feats of the sages of ancient India.’
    • ‘According to legend, all the sages once gathered in the Himalayas.’
    wise man, wise woman, learned man, learned woman, man of letters, woman of letters, philosopher, scholar, thinker, savant, solomon, nestor, solon
    pandit, authority, expert, guru, maharishi, mahatma, elder, teacher, guiding light, mentor
    View synonyms

adjective

  • Having, showing, or indicating profound wisdom.

    ‘they nodded in agreement with these sage remarks’
    • ‘Having spent six years teaching in Spain herself, she's an English as a Second Language veteran and seasons her answers to the pensive newbies with colourful stories and sage advice.’
    • ‘Jeeves' grave and sage philosophy towards booze is encapsulated perfectly at the end of another Wodehouse story.’
    • ‘Trying to keep the peace is the sage Andy, whose cool intellectualizing goes from being an annoying trait to an obvious shield for his own emotional issues.’
    • ‘New staff members' burning questions are often perfect opportunities to allow returning staff to dole out sage advice or let their positive camping experiences shine.’
    • ‘But for years this sage advice, though accepted almost universally among economists, had essentially no impact on policy.’
    • ‘In this autobiography, Manning portrays himself as a humble but highly intellectual and sage man who is driven by a love of country and his Christian faith.’
    • ‘Quite naturally from his advanced age of 24 he feels he can already look back on his own youth and offer sage advice and profound wisdom to his parents who are still raising his younger teenage brother.’
    • ‘Liberal Larry is offering sage advice regarding the tragedy in London.’
    • ‘As with the 2000 election, will you inject your sage Texas wisdom into your 2000 election projections?’
    • ‘As an example of that sage philosophy, the site's fantasy sports games and NCAA basketball tournament contests help draw sports fans to the site whether they have cable or not.’
    • ‘Jag wanted to snap at her, ask her where the hell she got off sounding so damned wise, but something in her sage words made sense.’
    • ‘He then continues to give him very sage, wise advice regarding governing wisely.’
    • ‘However, once refreshed - perhaps next year - he may be tempted back into the fray as a business angel, venture capitalist, corporate adviser or indeed sage media commentator.’
    • ‘I'll also be constrained by Kieran's sage advice; indeed I didn't feel much like posting after the war began for reasons much like those Kieran adduces.’
    • ‘I think this image-enhancement business is complete nonsense since not a single viewer remembers what the sage politician has uttered.’
    • ‘Adams analyzed this behavior with sage remarks regarding trace elements and essential dietary supplements.’
    • ‘So now that my kids are older and the people who feel proprietary over babies have lost their desire to give me sage advice, they have had to come up with new and improved ways of sticking their noses into my ovaries.’
    • ‘Remember the sage advice of Whodini, who, at the height of the crack era put out the ‘prescient’ hit single: The Freaks Come Out at Night.’
    • ‘I believe that, like me, you will gain a deeper appreciation for this illustrious artist after reading Moore's sage views.’
    • ‘But vows were meant to be broken, as the sage philosopher Jennifer Lopez has pointed out.’
    wise, learned, clever, intelligent, showing great knowledge, with great knowledge, knowledgeable, sensible, intellectual, scholarly, sagacious, erudite
    discerning, judicious, canny, penetrating, perceptive, acute, astute, shrewd, prudent, politic, thoughtful, full of insight, insightful, percipient, perspicacious, philosophical, profound, deep
    sapient
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (as an adjective): from Old French, from Latin sapere be wise.

Pronunciation:

sage

/sāj/