Definition of rutter in US English:

rutter

noun

  • A cavalry soldier, especially a German one, of the kind employed in the wars of the 16th and 17th centuries.

noun

historical
  • A set of instructions for finding a course at sea or, rarely, on land; a marine guide to routes, tides, etc.

noun

Scottish
  • A spade or other implement for cutting or marking off turf or ground.

noun

North American
historical
  • A kind of plough used by lumberjacks for making tracks for sleighs.

Origin

Early 16th century. From Middle Dutch rūter, rutter, variant of ruiter, ruyter (Dutch ruiter, † ruyter; goes to German Reuter (15th cent<br>mid 16th century; earliest use found in Richard Eden (c1520–1576), translator. From Middle French routier from route + -ier<br>late 18th century; earliest use found in John Abercrombie (1726–1806), horticulturist and writer. From rut + -er<br>late 19th century; earliest use found in Annual Reports Commissioner Patents 1896. From either rut or rut + -er.

Pronunciation

rutter

/ˈrʌtə/