Main definitions of rut in English

: rut1rut2

rut1

noun

  • 1A long deep track made by the repeated passage of the wheels of vehicles.

    • ‘The pavement ended and I wound through potholes and deep ruts wider than three of my tires put together.’
    • ‘I perch in the middle of the bench seat in the back, my knees knocking into everyone as the road turns from deep ruts into ravaged riverbed.’
    • ‘The surface is flat but uneven, closer attention must be paid to ankle-twisting ground below, especially those stretches where tire ruts are deepest.’
    • ‘His decision was based on complaints from environmental campaigners about 4x4s causing deep ruts and mud on the ancient path.’
    • ‘This resulted in deep ruts and heavy vehicle tyre tracks leaving it looking like a ploughed field.’
    • ‘My household bought a load of base course for our part of the road, but the ruts are getting progressively deeper.’
    • ‘I miscalculated the opening right-hand corner and the wheels got stuck in the deep ruts.’
    • ‘He opines that agricultural vehicles have caused the ruts.’
    • ‘With sharp rocks and deep ruts, crews had to strike the right balance between setting fast times and ensuring a reliable finish.’
    • ‘The wheels of the heavily laden wagons ground deep ruts into the soil.’
    • ‘During wet weather it is impossible for pedestrians to use parts of the pavement because of the deep ruts and puddles.’
    • ‘Within a few horse length's the track opened, and became wider, and I saw what looked like wheel ruts in the soft reddish soil.’
    • ‘In the afternoon the stages were a lot cleaner and less slippery than they were in the morning, although it was quite rough with several deep ruts.’
    • ‘Unseasonal rains have turned the wheel ruts into snaking rivers and the going is hard and heavy.’
    • ‘Trees have been removed and deep wheel ruts can be seen among the overgrown weeds.’
    • ‘He had been standing at the back of the float surrounded by presents when the front wheel dropped into a deep rut and he was thrown to the ground.’
    • ‘It was winter and the delta was full when they found themselves on the notorious Swamp Road, a 25 km sticky, muddy and unpredictable mess of tracks and axle deep ruts.’
    • ‘Walkers have complained that the activity spoiled their peace and say that the bikes have ruined paths by causing deep ruts which will stop spring flowers such as bluebells and daffodils from making their usual appearance.’
    • ‘This is not unlike getting wheels stuck in mud, and spinning them until the rut is deeper.’
    • ‘The wheels of her buggy had struck a deep rut on the shoulder of the road, and the vehicle was leaning at a precarious angle.’
    wheel track, furrow, groove, track, trough, ditch, trench, gutter, gouge, crack, hollow, hole, pothole, cavity, crater
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  • 2A habit or pattern of behavior that has become dull and unproductive but is hard to change.

    ‘the administration was stuck in a rut and was losing its direction’
    • ‘Men stuck in a rut and branded ‘losers’ in life's achievement stakes are getting the chance to come in from the cold by a new Government-funded advice service.’
    • ‘I knew I had it in me to try harder but we were both stuck in a rut and using drugs.’
    • ‘Stuck in a rut and earning a pittance in a hilariously misconceived Dublin production of Shakespeare's Richard III, the pair are rooted in the grim realities of a business based on illusions, and are at an all time low.’
    • ‘At senior level, permanent staff who feel stuck in a rut often enter the contract market looking for a change in their job role and a better quality of life.’
    • ‘Some people in the chattering classes have characterised it as dull and in a rut but that is far from the truth.’
    boring routine, humdrum existence, routine job, same old round, groove, grind, daily grind, treadmill, dead end, assembly line
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: probably from Old French rute (see route).

Pronunciation:

rut

/rət/

Main definitions of rut in English

: rut1rut2

rut2

noun

  • An annual period of sexual activity in deer and some other mammals, during which the males fight each other for access to the females.

    • ‘Her father had often warned her to stay clear of male animals in rut, for they were dangerous.’
    • ‘Trout will continue to feed on salmon fry; moose will battle during rut season; forests will erupt in a volcanic splendor of color late every fall.’
    • ‘The annual rut, or breeding cycle, peaks in deep South Texas during late December, and cold conditions will coincide with the movement.’
    • ‘Lust-crazed stags in rut are spotted by intrepid early - birds on the Skye Deck, as seals and otters play in the foamy waters off the Summer Isles.’
    • ‘For stags the season was set to coincide with the rut, the time of year when they are most active and impressive and, according to estate owners, represent the finest sporting quarry.’
    • ‘Kidney mass thus increases in males from the stressful rut period in early winter to the summer months.’
    • ‘Guarding males are thought to forage less during the rut than do nonguarding males, possibly leading to greater fitness costs.’
    • ‘Males and females live separately, except during the rut, which is in September.’
    • ‘Older bulls lose their antlers in December, following the rut, while the younger males may keep theirs as late as February.’
    • ‘Apart from the distinct rutting behavior, one of the most pronounced features seen in many ungulates is the difference in habitat utilization before the rut season.’
    • ‘For the duration of the rut, territorial bulls within smelling distance of cows will barely pause long enough to munch a mouthful of grass.’
    • ‘Male reindeer, known as bulls, shed their antlers after the autumn rut and they are no longer dominant.’
    • ‘The topi rut typically lasts 1.5 months and takes place during the long rains between March and May.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Engage in rutting.

    ‘a rutting stag’
    • ‘Theories behind the formations have ranged from warnings from extra terrestrials, the result of the Earth's magnetic field, secret military experiments, frantically rutting hedgehogs, or two men with a plank of wood and a rope.’
    • ‘But in the Scottish highlands, surrounded by rutting males, the cold truth was horribly different’
    • ‘The sparring between bulls during rutting season can be extremely violent.’
    • ‘They are abundant in this area, and in the autumn the sound of the stags rutting reverberates.’
    • ‘Figure 3 shows mass change for bighorn rams 1 year and older in relation to the proportion of time spent in rutting activities during the rut from 2000-2002.’
    • ‘With only a couple of exceptions, rutting activity is finished or nearly so.’
    • ‘At this time of year it's rutting season for the deer, which means that stags are particularly aggressive and could attack dogs.’
    • ‘But when the heart gets involved, all our painfully acquired metaphysical insights go right out the window, and we're reduced to battling it out like rutting chimpanzees.’
    • ‘Conventionally male and female caribou are assumed to congregate on rutting areas, which I believe is usually true for Peary caribou.’
    • ‘The deer were not rutting but grazing, presumably the sex done with for the year.’
    • ‘This is what a courting / rutting male guinea pig does.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin rugitus, from rugire to roar.

Pronunciation:

rut

/rət/