Definition of runner in US English:

runner

noun

  • 1A person who runs, especially in a specified way.

    ‘Mary was a fast runner’
    • ‘As stated at the start Barry wasn't the fastest runner from the Newry area.’
    • ‘The fastest runner completed the course in just 19 minutes and fourth home was a nine-year-old girl.’
    • ‘He was the fastest runner at school, he knew the maths and the grammar the best, and on the top of it, he could paint and draw better than me.’
    • ‘Anna was a fast runner, trying out for track in the spring.’
    • ‘He was extremely fit and is reputed to have been one of the fastest runners in the village and also regularly won local cycle races.’
    • ‘Madison was such a fast runner that ever since I can remember we begged her to try out for track, but she always turned us down.’
    • ‘I had always been a fast runner, so it didn't take me very long to get into the park which was 2 blocks away.’
    • ‘I was quite a fast runner at school, and ran 100m in 12.9s.’
    • ‘He was the fastest runner from his field at both distances, clocking 32 minutes, 43 seconds and 14 minutes, 22 seconds.’
    • ‘He said as he thought he was the fastest runner.’
    • ‘He may not be the fastest runner next weekend, but he'll give it his best shot, rugby match or no rugby match.’
    • ‘Ok so I was the fastest runner in school, but she doesn't have to know that.’
    • ‘He was well built because he always worked out, and probably one of the fastest runners at school.’
    • ‘I was the fastest runner in gym class back where I came from.’
    • ‘I plan to run the London Marathon when I am older, so though I am not a fast runner, I can run, and I have the determination to get through it.’
    • ‘I was a good runner, the fastest in the whole place.’
    • ‘Being a fast runner, he soon left the two of them behind.’
    • ‘I wasn't called the fastest runner in high school for nothing.’
    • ‘The fifth-grader, is an honor student, a member of the chess club and one of the school's fastest runners.’
    • ‘Matt and I are the fastest runners in this program.’
    1. 1.1 A person who runs competitively as a sport or hobby.
      ‘a marathon runner’
      • ‘Every year the number of runners in this popular marathon increases.’
      • ‘Over 130 runners finished the full marathon held in conjunction with a half distance event in a small East Anglian town.’
      • ‘More than 800 marathon runners from overseas flew into the province for this run.’
      • ‘Jack was a runner; he used to go out every lunch time and even when he got ill he kept on with it for as long as he could.’
      • ‘At the outset I assumed I would end up with two sprinters, two milers and two long-distance runners.’
      • ‘Normally super-fit people, say marathon runners, have an average heart rate of 65.’
      • ‘For competitive marathon runners, this route is nevertheless considered a hard one.’
      • ‘People are never too old to exercise. There is an excellent research paper on marathon runners over 80!’
      • ‘They had a couple of marathon runners, a boxer and a weightlifter.’
      • ‘All runners will collect a souvenir memento, with trophies for the first three in each of the categories in the 10 km race.’
      • ‘The runners are collecting sponsorship in time for the half-marathon next month.’
      • ‘My father, a marathon runner, taught me the basics of healthful eating.’
      • ‘Imagine a marathon runner crossing the finish line and then being told he has to run an additional 10 miles - uphill.’
      • ‘Nearly 500 runners tackled the course, which involved around 7,000 feet of climbing, and 404 made it to the finish.’
      • ‘But one place that trendy diet doesn't belong is in the lives of athletes, whether they be marathon runners or weekend warriors.’
      • ‘In the aftermath of the London marathon, many runners may be questioning whether their performance could have been improved by changing their pre-race diet.’
      • ‘You can have great track, road and marathon runners all competing in the one race.’
      • ‘As the number of marathon runners, tennis players and athletes increases, so does the importance of sport-specific training.’
      • ‘I had a doctor who was, or at least looked like, a marathon runner.’
      • ‘She swapped track for road, became a marathon runner, ran three marathons and won the lot.’
    2. 1.2 A horse that runs in a particular race.
      ‘there were only four runners’
      • ‘The limit for the race is 20 runners so some horses could face being balloted out later in the week.’
      • ‘Only six of the 260 runners declared at the five-day entry stage to run on August 22 had confirmed riders.’
    3. 1.3 A messenger, collector, or agent for a bank, bookmaker, or other organization.
      • ‘The runners, who collected taxes, delivered communications, and arrested and jailed criminals, belonged to a lower social class.’
      • ‘Sammy had even heard of one agent who made his runners pick cotton on his farm as part of their ‘training.’’
      • ‘However, they had no phone lines between their main bases and had to rely on runners to keep in contact with each other.’
      • ‘The owners would send money or messages by means of a runner provided by their agent.’
      messenger, courier, errand boy, messenger boy
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4Baseball A base runner.
      • ‘With the score tied in the bottom of the ninth inning and a runner on second base, the batter hits a ball over the right-field fence.’
      • ‘The next batter hits a ball toward first base that hits the runner before the fielder can make a play.’
      • ‘In which case, the batter is credited with a home run, driving in all runners on base.’
      • ‘He's a smart hitter, smart runner, and smart fielder.’
      • ‘Now, if there's a runner on first base only, that runner must also hold on a pop-up.’
    5. 1.5 A messenger in the army.
      • ‘A runner was sent to an army listening post, which contacted the Ambassador in Kathmandu, who telegraphed London.’
      • ‘I'm sending runners from command post to commanders to get orders out to them.’
      • ‘In desperation, the Greek army sent a runner in full battle gear to tell the Senate the news.’
  • 2in combination A person who smuggles specified goods into or out of a country or area.

    ‘a drug-runner’
  • 3A rod, groove, or blade on which something slides.

    1. 3.1 Each of the long pieces on the underside of a sled that forms the contact in sliding.
      • ‘After a few hours of this we stopped to put the metal guide pins down through the sledge runners a notch or two deeper, so as to give more effective grip on the ice surface.’
    2. 3.2often runners A roller for moving a heavy article.
      • ‘The work to which the judge said he would return concerned the removal of a roller shutter and the runners to either side of it at the front of the shop.’
    3. 3.3 A ring capable of slipping or sliding along a strap or rod or through which something may be passed or drawn.
      • ‘Space the runner along the rod so it drapes gently between the rings.’
    4. 3.4Nautical A rope run through a block.
  • 4A shoot, typically leafless, which grows from the base of a plant along the surface of the ground and can take root at points along its length.

    • ‘Buttercups have creeping runners that root at intervals and are almost as difficult to dislodge as dock.’
    • ‘This way, plants can concentrate all of their energy on producing strong roots and far-stretching runners.’
    • ‘Most warm-season grasses develop thatch, a spongelike layer of roots, runners, and grass blades just above the soil surface.’
    • ‘Where the plants were growing runners I pegged these down into potting compost with unbent paper clips and watered them.’
    • ‘Herbs that spread by runners are good candidates because they can be contained in the pot.’
    • ‘Finally, the pupils used six tubs to plant strawberry runners.’
    • ‘Pegged-down strawberry runners may be lifted now, severed from the parent plant and planted out.’
    • ‘Trim up overhanging foliage from surrounding plants and simultaneously cut back any stray grass runners before they take root in adjacent beds.’
    • ‘Rent a power rake to cut through heavy thatch and runners of grasses such as Bermudagrass.’
    • ‘Admittedly they're not very big strawberries, but they taste nice, and the proper strawberry plants only ever seem to grow runners.’
    • ‘They propagate easily; self-sowing and by underground runners, making this plant an easy keeper.’
    • ‘Leave about 1 inch of pot rim above the soil surface to help discourage the runners from climbing out over the top.’
    • ‘It grows from seed, underground runners, or any teeny bit of root.’
    shoot, offshoot, sprout, tendril, sprig, sucker
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    1. 4.1 A plant that spreads by means of runners.
      • ‘In a nearby field his tomb is a threshing floor bordered by pawpaw trees, sugar cane, sweet potato runners.’
      • ‘Some, called runners, spread exuberantly, and others are classified as clumpers, which slowly expands from the original planting.’
      • ‘Propagate strawberry plants once the crop is finished by pegging down a couple of runners from your best plants.’
      • ‘This spacing allows the runners to root and eventually form a matted row.’
      • ‘For the same reason, avoid planting your runners in soil that has been used for growing potatoes the previous year.’
      • ‘Generally, the tropical bamboos tend to be clumpers and the temperate bamboos tend to be runners.’
      • ‘February is when city slickers prune their roses and fruit trees, cut back their blackberry vines, and tug up bamboo runners.’
    2. 4.2 A twining plant.
  • 5A long, narrow rug or strip of carpet, especially for a hall or stairway.

    • ‘Andrei fell in a heap on the carpet runner, screening in pain and clutching his knee.’
    • ‘The floor was still that gold flecked marble, but it also had a deep red carpet runner down the center.’
    • ‘Sliding down the hallway on a carpet runner, Scott came to a screeching halt beside his little sister and reached down to take her hand.’
    rug, carpet, drugget
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  • 6A revolving millstone.

  • 7A fast-swimming fish of the jack family, occurring in tropical seas.

    Several species in the family Carangidae, in particular the colorfully striped rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinnulata) of warm seas worldwide, and the blue runner (Caranx crysos) of the western Atlantic

    • ‘They will catch a large variety of small fish which gather under a boat, such as blue runner, jacks and pilchards.’
    • ‘Stopping on the way I cast a fly to a snapper which quickly grabbed hold, this was followed by a blue runner then a small barracuda which after one jump threw the hook.’
    • ‘A lot of small fish will do the job - Spanish mackerel, bluefish - but the preferred bait is the blue runner, also called a hardtail.’

Phrases

  • do a runner

    • informal Leave hastily, especially to avoid paying for something or to escape from somewhere.

      • ‘She suggests to Zoe that she does a runner before her trial, and despite initially laughing off the idea she begins to consider it as an option.’
      • ‘But that won't stop them taking the money and still doing a runner.’
      • ‘She informs Kat about Chrissie's plans to do a runner.’
      • ‘Apparently prisoners quite often used to do a runner out of court after hearing their sentence.’
      • ‘He also admitted doing a runner when she came round and was upset.’
      • ‘It may be only a minor thing tonight, but as soon as it looks like he is sacrificing his personal life so that he can be with me, I am doing a runner…’
      • ‘At this point, Kathy climbed out of her own bedroom window and did a runner.’
      • ‘We weren't pleased about it but he said he would make up the extra time, but he then did a runner on the Saturday during a break and checked out of his hotel.’
      • ‘When I did a runner from school he was always supportive.’
      • ‘Like so many other youngsters who do a runner, she realises you can't escape your past.’
      run away, flee, run off, make a run for it, run for it, take flight, make off, take off, take to one's heels, make a break for it, bolt, beat a retreat, beat a hasty retreat, make a quick exit, make one's getaway, escape, head for the hills
      View synonyms

Pronunciation

runner

/ˈrənər//ˈrənər/