Definition of rumpus in English:

rumpus

noun

informal
  • [usually in singular] A noisy disturbance; a commotion.

    ‘he caused a rumpus with his flair for troublemaking’
    • ‘The 28-year-old lost more than half his ear in the rumpus which spilled onto the pavement outside Zinc in Lucy Road.’
    • ‘The transfer rumpus left the defender attempting to re-focus attention on the tie at Wycombe, the winners of which will face a trip to either Grimsby or York in round four.’
    • ‘No repeat of the Chawama rumpus must be allowed.’
    • ‘Unfortunately amidst the rumpus I'd lost Richard and his friends.’
    • ‘A MAN who created a rumpus in Burnley Jobcentre got a ticking off from a judge who slammed his behaviour as ‘wholly unacceptable.’’
    • ‘It is also good to see that police have already taken action against some of their men who were involved in the rumpus at the Chikwa courts.’
    • ‘He recalled: ‘There had been a bit of a rumpus going on and then I heard him shouting for help.’’
    • ‘The Munali rumpus is a warning that their actions can generate reactions that only help to aggravate the situation and estrange them from an otherwise sympathetic public.’
    • ‘Students entering the dining hall made an eager rumpus.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, last weekend there was a bit of a rumpus in Bath Street late in the evening which led to a couple of Police cars being called out to calm things down.’
    • ‘The rumpus followed a majority vote of the finance ministers not to launch legal action which could have meant huge fines against Paris and Berlin.’
    • ‘That was a genuine abuse of her position, yet it caused less of a fuss than the present rumpus.’
    • ‘Fortunately for Standard Life it has no institutional investors to make a rumpus over this slight discrepancy, which is why policyholders should make their voices heard on Tuesday.’
    • ‘Perhaps mindful of the rumpus which had occurred between them the previous day, the referee warned him three times for not making enough effort to allow his opponent a clear view of the ball.’
    • ‘Her Super Bowl performance created a rumpus that prompted the TNT television company to use a seven-second delay during the All-Star game.’
    • ‘ALL amateur rugby league matches this weekend have been cancelled until further notice because of a renewed rumpus regarding rocketing insurance premiums.’
    • ‘Ordinary shareholders will have to cause a rumpus at the annual general meetings to force real accountability and change.’
    • ‘The contrived rumpus over Section 28 is nothing.’
    • ‘Despite the rumpus, it's business as usual with the side to play England still stuffed full of players born and bred outwith these borders and in many cases playing their rugby outside Scotland.’
    • ‘The story that caused the rumpus is still cloudy.’
    disturbance, commotion, uproar, confusion, furore, brouhaha, hue and cry, ruckus, fuss, fracas, melee, tumult, riot, brawl, free-for-all, scuffle, struggle, altercation, quarrel
    noise, racket, din, outcry
    donnybrook
    to-do, carry-on, ruction, shindig, shindy, hullabaloo, hoo-ha, ballyhoo, dust-up, scrap, stink
    row, kerfuffle
    stooshie
    foofaraw, rough house
    affray
    broil
    bagarre
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century: probably fanciful.

Pronunciation:

rumpus

/ˈrəmpəs/