Main definitions of rum in English

: rum1rum2

rum1

noun

  • 1An alcoholic liquor distilled from sugar-cane residues or molasses.

    • ‘If you mix three different rums with four kinds of fruit juice, the chances that the finished product will be a pleasant quaff are pretty good.’
    • ‘The stunning gallery hosts over 450 single malts, rums and cognacs.’
    • ‘With a yellow bird on the Seagrape terrace, I sit transfixed as the cocktail, a blend of three local rums, accentuates the robust cacophony of tree frogs.’
    • ‘They ran up a bill and started rowing with the waitress over the cost of their vodkas and rums.’
    • ‘The dark brown colour of some rums is produced by the addition of generous amounts of caramel, which unfortunately tends to smother any flavours derived from distillation or maturation.’
    • ‘He counseled using a mixture of light and dark rums in punches, because unlike other spirits, rums are better when you mix them together.’
    • ‘There are some fine tapas dishes and a wide choice of tasty Cuban rums and we recommend you lie back on antique couches and chairs and sample the menu.’
    • ‘As for the cocktails - gins, rums, vodkas and whiskeys mix effortlessly with exotic Indian and eastern fruits and flavours, the perfect balance of two cultures.’
    • ‘This bar is for more discerning drinkers with media babes cramming into funky upstairs booths after work to sample rare rums, tequilas and exotic Brazilian-syle tapas.’
    • ‘While spiced and coconut rums have been staples at the bar for years, new flavors are starting to appear.’
    • ‘Drinks range from fine rums and whiskies to brandy, while art works and coffee table books add to an ambience of exclusive sophistication.’
    • ‘Good wine and spirits shops usually carry a range of rums from various islands, but there are some exceptional blends that are rarely exported.’
    • ‘As with malt whisky, the dark rums are aged in oak barrels and caramel is added to produce extra colour, though in greater quantities than is added to whisky, especially in the case of dark rum.’
    • ‘When I hit the sack after having a few rums I can sleep very soundly.’
    • ‘During the food festival, the cafe will be decorated in the Cuban fashion, live Cuban music will be played and Cuban cigars, wines and rums will be on display and for sale.’
    • ‘The pub has a large, varied and moderately-priced wine list, as well as a normal pub bar, and features a specials board for an interesting selection of different rums and whiskies.’
    • ‘And now my head hurts because I drank too many dirty rums.’
    • ‘Dinner finishes with rums from around the Caribbean in the rum shop.’
    • ‘While flavors are all the rage in both vodkas and rums, the market for each spirit type differs.’
    • ‘He would have a few rums, buy everyone a drink and sing a few verses of a song if he was asked.’
    1. 1.1North American Intoxicating liquor.
      • ‘He said it was the liquor, rum and rotgut, which made him ill, but all of our servants couldn't lift him up straight when the doctor came a visiting, and I reckon it was something worse.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: perhaps an abbreviation of obsolete rumbullion, in the same sense.

Pronunciation:

rum

/rəm/

Main definitions of rum in English

: rum1rum2

rum2

adjective

British
informal, dated
  • Odd; peculiar.

    ‘it's a rum business, certainly’
    rummy
    ‘they were a rum bunch’
    • ‘We live in a rum world where politicians and the media put people on trial.’
    • ‘It's certainly a rum old place, this Brave New World.’
    • ‘Someone had decided to cajole this rum collection of musicians into an all-hands-to-the-pump version of John Lennon's Across the Universe.’
    • ‘The whole thing's been distinctly rum from the word go…’
    • ‘Since time immemorial man has caught fish and whales, but in the past three decades a rum situation has emerged.’
    odd, strange, peculiar, unusual, funny, bizarre, queer, weird, curious, abnormal, singular
    suspicious, suspect, dubious, questionable
    unco
    funny peculiar
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 18th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

rum

/rəm/