Definition of rubbish in English:

rubbish

noun

British
  • 1Waste material; refuse or litter.

    ‘an alleyway high with rubbish’
    • ‘West Wiltshire District Council is introducing a new twin bin scheme, which sees recyclable waste and regular rubbish collected on alternate weeks.’
    • ‘The council provides residents with a green waste bin for non-recyclable household rubbish, bags for paper, boxes for glass and a separate bin for garden waste.’
    • ‘It was finally discovered right at the bottom of a pile of garden waste and other rubbish, but with the gold and gems intact.’
    • ‘Waste ground on Tile Street was also reported to be badly littered with rubbish.’
    • ‘Often the buses are dirty, smelly and littered with rubbish.’
    • ‘The winners of City of York Council's summer clean-up campaign were presented with prizes, won after they gained raffle tickets for putting their rubbish in waste bins.’
    • ‘From the start of the procession we were pelted with rubbish, litter, very hard sweets, stones and eggs.’
    • ‘What do we care what happens to our rubbish after the nice refuse engineer has collected it from our home?’
    • ‘We know that some people fear a build-up of rubbish where domestic waste collections have been reduced.’
    • ‘The Government has known for five years that disposing of solid toxic waste with domestic rubbish would be banned, bringing the UK in line with the rest of Europe.’
    • ‘This will allow the council to introduce alternate weekly collections of recyclable waste one week and non-recyclable rubbish from the grey wheeled bin the next.’
    • ‘The landscaped areas behind the bus stop - which residents say attracts rats because of rubbish thrown by litter louts - will also be cleaned up if the scheme is passed.’
    • ‘Teams of children, aged between 12 and 19 years, cleared piles of rubbish in a two-hour litter blitz.’
    • ‘Some people were having to take their excess rubbish to the municipal waste depot at Thornton-le-Dale.’
    • ‘Under the new scheme the town's bin lorries will collect recyclable waste and household rubbish on alternate weeks forcing residents to hold onto black sacks for up to 14 days.’
    • ‘If we care so much about our town's image, how come there is chewing gum trodden into the costly paving in Victoria Square and all sorts of cans, cartons and stray rubbish littering our streets?’
    • ‘The team will also be happy to offer practical help and advice to anyone who experiences difficulties fitting rubbish into their refuse bin when the new fortnightly collection rota begins.’
    • ‘The scheme requires people using a van or trailer to dump rubbish at household waste sites to pay for a permit.’
    • ‘The government and councils have told bin workers to refuse to collect rubbish from homes that have not paid.’
    • ‘While walking on the prom on Saturday night, close to the entrance to the stone jetty, I came across a dog waste bin overflowing with rubbish.’
    refuse, waste, garbage, litter, discarded matter, debris, detritus, scrap, dross
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    1. 1.1 Material that is considered unimportant or valueless.
      ‘she had to sift through the rubbish in every drawer’
      • ‘Among the jumble and mess were hidden treasures priceless articles bundled next to worthless rubbish.’
      • ‘They cobble together any old rubbish to pass off as art such as baths full of baked beans or piles of old house bricks.’
    2. 1.2 Absurd, nonsensical, or worthless talk or ideas.
      ‘I suppose you believe that rubbish about vampires’
      • ‘What we are hearing now is just total drivel and rubbish.’
      • ‘What a load of rubbish, how can they stand there talking such nonsense in front of reporters?’
      • ‘I have never read such a load of rubbish in my life.’
      • ‘I think the idea of a metrosexual man is a load of rubbish.’
      • ‘Some of these television pundits do talk a load of rubbish!’
      • ‘This bill is gobbledygook; it is twaddle; it is rubbish.’
      • ‘Well, I do have some ideas, but they're all rubbish.’
      • ‘They thought it was a load of rubbish and just ignored it as any proof had yet to be discovered.’
      • ‘Since when are you a great believer in true love and all that romance novel rubbish?’
      • ‘It is smug, fundamentalist rubbish to suggest that simply because people do not believe in this particular bill, they are anti-family.’
      • ‘We have been accused of selling out at Warwick - what a load of rubbish.’
      • ‘How can so many people in the world's most technically advanced nation believe such rubbish?’
      • ‘It is very difficult to believe half the rubbish uttered by some team managers before and after matches these days.’
      • ‘There are still a few die-hard bigots around who still believe that sort of rubbish.’
      • ‘It was a load of rubbish, I don't want to waste my time watching that.’
      • ‘Many people here who suffer from cancer believed this rubbish and of course spent their life savings and even incurred debts to pay for this man's vitamins to cure the disease.’
      • ‘A lot of people say I talk a load of rubbish in this column but this particular week they are absolutely right.’
      • ‘And we can safely say that it is a load of rubbish.’
      • ‘It is nothing short of extraordinary that, at the close of the 20th century, intelligent people still believe in superstitious rubbish.’
      • ‘The claim made by the Minister that this bill will reduce compliance costs, and suchlike, is a load of rubbish.’
      nonsense, balderdash, gibberish, claptrap, blarney, blather, blether, moonshine
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
informal
  • Criticize severely and reject as worthless.

    ‘he has pointedly rubbished professional estimates of the development and running costs’
    • ‘Scotland might again be its own worst enemy, rubbishing a plucky enterprise which succeeded in publishing a handful of worthwhile books against the odds.’
    • ‘But look, I'm not completely rubbishing the idea.’
    • ‘Granted, the media response to the series was overwhelmingly hostile, with The Sunday Times to the fore in rubbishing the programmes.’
    • ‘Carlyle rubbished talk of retirement immediately after suffering the injury, and he has reiterated his eagerness to return to action.’
    • ‘Even if post modernism readily swaps wit and subversion for gravitas and rubbishes the idea of the ‘original’ in art, the question is not invalid.’
    • ‘But ministers have been notably restrained about rubbishing the paper on microphone.’
    • ‘I express this concern to my friend, who rubbishes my fears.’
    • ‘Using his position at the University of Berlin he dedicated himself to rubbishing Cantor's ideas and ruining him personally.’
    • ‘Since then he has spent much of his time rubbishing Jack's achievements in the job.’
    • ‘These petty slurs have been rubbished by the business consortium and players alike.’
    • ‘Constantly rubbishing residential childcare is enormously detrimental to the young people and staff who live and work in them.’
    • ‘For more than a month, employees at the stately home had denied all knowledge of an impending wedding, rubbishing local rumours that the island would host the occasion.’
    • ‘He is at his splenetic best when rubbishing Auden's poetry, a subject he joyously returns to again and again.’
    • ‘Jennifer's spokesperson has also rubbished the rumours’
    • ‘Rumours that certain parts of the college are haunted were rubbished by one porter, who dismissed them as ‘codswallop’.’
    • ‘Continental Europeans rubbished the idea, saying that generations of French and Italian women and children had eaten soft cheese without ill effect.’
    • ‘His previous books on what he says are earth's forgotten civilisations were bestsellers - but rubbished by certain academics.’
    • ‘She wasn't buying any of this, but thought she would pick it apart rationally before she rubbished it publicly.’
    • ‘Ever since we first discovered foreign food gastronomes have been rubbishing homegrown grub as fatty stodge.’
    • ‘A senior road policing officer has rubbished reports that a dual carriageway near Chelmsford is being used as an unofficial race track.’
    belittle, denigrate, deprecate, depreciate, downgrade, play down, deflate, trivialize, minimize, make light of, treat lightly, undervalue, underrate, underestimate
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adjective

British
informal
  • Very bad; worthless or useless.

    ‘people might say I was a rubbish manager’
    • ‘It sounds like a rubbish chain of hotels.’
    • ‘We constantly hear about people being encouraged to dump their cars and get on the bus but then we are left with a rubbish bus service.’
    • ‘The wonderful thing about football is that you can always find something to lighten up your day - even when you've got no leg room, a restricted view and are watching a rubbish game at Oldham.’
    worthless, valueless, trashy, inferior, unsatisfactory, substandard, second-rate, third-rate, poor-quality, low-quality, low-grade, cheap, shoddy, tawdry, gimcrack, twopenny-halfpenny
    very bad, very poor, awful, terrible, dreadful, appalling, frightful, atrocious, inferior, incompetent, inadequate, ineffective
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French rubbous; perhaps related to Old French robe ‘spoils’; compare with rubble. The change in the ending was due to association with -ish. The verb (1950s) was originally Australian and New Zealand slang.

Pronunciation

rubbish

/ˈrəbiSH//ˈrəbɪʃ/