Main definitions of rove in English

: rove1rove2rove3rove4

rove1

verb

  • 1no object , with adverbial of direction Travel constantly without a fixed destination; wander.

    ‘he spent most of the 1990s roving about the Caribbean’
    • ‘It was certainly on my mind as I roved around Gate 5 of Comiskey Park before the 74th All-Star game on the South Side of Chicago.’
    • ‘He recognized the demons immediately: deadly humanoids who roved around in gangs.’
    • ‘The opportunity to knock somebody out quietly or take a hostage is not often present since enemies tend to rove in groups.’
    • ‘The dads were out roving around town making sure no little child strayed too far in search of hidden eggs.’
    • ‘No matter how far they rove or how big and strong they grow, there comes a day when they abandon the sea and seek again their high mountain place of birth.’
    • ‘It could, of course, deploy a huge army of monitors to rove about the countryside checking the actions of every farmer, but this would be very costly.’
    • ‘He followed them as best he could around the hold and saw them rove back and forth, as if searching for something.’
    • ‘A plant sits in one place and makes glucose from sunlight, carbon dioxide and water, whereas an animal roves about and needs to find its food outside of itself.’
    • ‘For many years this was a dangerous frontier land, where pirates roved and merchantmen ventured at their peril.’
    • ‘He is now roving about the Gatineau hills north of Ottawa, devoting his time to books on our forestry heritage.’
    • ‘It was dusk, and the desert animals roved during the night, the plants would provide a good protection.’
    • ‘Will you come again, when you're not roving up and down Italy like a brigand?’
    • ‘It looked like armies were roving from place to place.’
    • ‘Armies of children were still roving around on the decks.’
    • ‘Foul-mouthed mobs roved around the dark Edinburgh streets, looting and vandalising premises owned by Italians.’
    • ‘Different animals rove through their hunting grounds.’
    wander, roam, ramble, drift, meander, go hither and thither, maunder
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Wander over or through (a place) without a destination.
      ‘children roving the streets’
      • ‘From the haggard look, rag tag clothing and matted hair it was not difficult to identify her as the mad woman who roved the streets.’
      • ‘Like the vast majority of people living in Mexico, he buys his music from one of the 12,000 street vendors who rove the country.’
      • ‘She began her job back in 1997, roving the badlands of Quebec and Ontario before heading out to British Columbia to take a position in the PR department.’
      • ‘When drunk they would rove the streets of London, molesting fair damsels and burning down buildings as a lark.’
      • ‘His previous rider was recently killed in combat, and the horse was found roving the battle site and brought here.’
      • ‘In the mid-1800s, they roved the streets of St. John's, sometimes attacking spectators or fighting with rival bands.’
      • ‘An avid antiquer, Peggy loves to rove the nearby town of Essex for one-of-a-kind furniture and accessories.’
      • ‘With all the armed bands of various factions roving the land these days, it was a miracle that they had made it back to the abbey.’
      • ‘The series was one of the first to rove the world, shooting its exteriors in such exotic locations as Madrid, Acapulco, Marrakesh, Rome, Tokyo, Mexico City and even Las Vegas.’
      • ‘Maybe you have never even been to the corporate headquarters, and you rove the globe packing a laptop that connects to your company's headquarters.’
    2. 1.2usually as adjective roving Travel for one's work, having no fixed base.
      ‘he trained as a roving reporter’
      • ‘During her school years, after her father had left his parish to become a roving minister, she came into contact with the larger Baptist community.’
      • ‘He has already hired his own roving war correspondent and set up an adventure channel on which mountain climbers will post their own videos.’
      • ‘These were plays performed in fifteenth century England by roving troupes of actors.’
      • ‘Upon completing his studies, he moved back to Kyrgyzstan and landed a job as roving Central Asia correspondent for Pravda.’
      • ‘These were true economic migrants, businessmen and roving employees who made no apologies about seeking a richer life elsewhere in the sun.’
      • ‘It also operated unconventionally: the founder and director was employed as a roving sales consultant, reporting to the sales manager of whichever country he happened to be in.’
      • ‘An hour will set you back £2.99, but you can get a whole day for a tenner - pretty good value for the roving reporter.’
      • ‘Doing that risks a disenchanted MP from the right wing getting boozed and leaking his or her displeasure to a roving reporter.’
      • ‘‘Gertrude Lawrence was a glamorous, exciting personality who lived a flamboyant and extravagant life,’ he said to a roving reporter.’
      • ‘But no one can doubt his importance as one the first roving independent explorers armed with a camera.’
      • ‘In many city plazas, there are roving street vendors selling sweet espresso to passers-by.’
      • ‘Our roving contributor inspired the wrath of one of our Finnish readers with his almost correct brief history of the previously low profile Aland Islands.’
      • ‘For years he was literally on his feet as a roving reporter, plunged into regions of conflict or crisis to try to make sense of it all for us.’
      • ‘His resignation as trade and industry secretary lead to promotion as roving ambassador to the Project's international friends.’
      • ‘What is out there course-wise for would-be roving reporters?’
      • ‘For example, a visitor waiting for a family member in treatment can get gourmet coffee or fresh-squeezed juice from a roving vendor.’
      • ‘As their roving reporter, I covered most of the media awards.’
      • ‘Our roving reporter caught up with the composer in Berlin to discuss this musical gesture of reconciliation.’
      • ‘You'll probably be just a little sickened to hear it's been pretty much plain sailing for this up-and-coming roving reporter.’
      • ‘The site has a roving reporter and European Editor in Chief, who writes cheery newsletters from, for instance France, and the Left Coast of the USA.’
    3. 1.3 (of eyes) look in changing directions in order to see something thoroughly.
      ‘the policeman's eyes roved around the bar’
      • ‘She watched his eyes rove quickly over her body, and she smiled at his look of surprise.’
      • ‘His eyesight (now back and glitch-less) roved hungrily around the room.’
      • ‘All eyes rove for something catchy at a handicrafts exhibition - for something utilitarian that will appeal to your aesthetic sense too.’
      • ‘My eyes kept roving to the grandfather clock from time to time.’
      • ‘Their eyes roved back to the demolished Porsche and wondered what the owner of the car would do if he ever found out who did it.’
      • ‘Yet those eyes held nothing but want as they roved up and down him shamelessly.’
      • ‘She allowed her gaze to rove over the gentleman, in some odd mix of sizing him up, and curiosity at this stranger from another time.’
      • ‘The blond man stopped in his tracks, locking his sword into a perfect defensive position, his pale eyes roving into the shadows, searching for the voice's source.’
      • ‘His just couldn't keep his eyes from looking out of the glass panels and roving over the plains, hoping for a sight of her.’
      • ‘Geoffrey allowed his eyes to rove over her body, taking in her silver-blue eyes and long, curling blonde hair.’
      • ‘Inside, my gaze roved over the leather couches, the silken pillows sprawled carelessly all over the place.’
      • ‘She smiled falsely at everyone around them, her eyes roving.’
      • ‘The demon's gaze roved and stopped on me.’
      • ‘His eyes roving around the room, searching for a way out of this mess.’
      • ‘While he spoke, I could see his curious eyes roving over us, trying to understand the unfamiliar sounds that reached his ears.’
      • ‘He unsheathed his father's sword and held it in both hands, his eyes roving over the blade with the ancient runes and the ornately designed handle.’
      • ‘Cora's pink eyes were roving over Dervek's bare chest approvingly.’
      • ‘In each corner stood a burly guard, their eyes roving over the people materializing every few minutes from seven of the eight walls.’
      • ‘Ryan nodded gravely, his eyes roving over the guests.’
      • ‘He continued to allow his gaze to rove over the gleaming blade, menacingly sharp, as well as its well-decorated hilt.’

noun

North American
  • A journey, especially one with no specific destination; an act of wandering.

    ‘a new exhibit will electrify campuses on its national rove’

Origin

Late 15th century (originally a term in archery in the sense ‘shoot at a casual mark of undetermined range’): perhaps from dialect rave ‘to stray’, probably of Scandinavian origin.

Pronunciation

rove

/roʊv//rōv/

Main definitions of rove in English

: rove1rove2rove3rove4

rove2

Pronunciation

rove

/rōv//roʊv/

Main definitions of rove in English

: rove1rove2rove3rove4

rove3

noun

  • A sliver of cotton, wool, or other fiber, drawn out and slightly twisted, especially preparatory to spinning.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Form (slivers of wool, cotton, or other fiber) into roves.

Origin

Late 18th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

rove

/roʊv//rōv/

Main definitions of rove in English

: rove1rove2rove3rove4

rove4

noun

  • A small metal plate or ring for a rivet to pass through and be clenched over, especially in boatbuilding.

    • ‘For door experts, it is made of four plain oak boards, held in place by an edging frame and four half-round ledges, all fastened by neat clasping elongated roves.’
    • ‘The posts and the keel would then be joined with iron roves to start the hull, with the three main sections being wedged securely upright with wooden props.’
    • ‘Each nail was driven through the two planks, the rove was placed over the end of the nail, and the point was knocked down over the rove to ‘clench’ the two planks together.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse ró, with the addition of parasitic -v-.

Pronunciation

rove

/roʊv//rōv/