Main definitions of rout in English

: rout1rout2

rout1

noun

  • 1A disorderly retreat of defeated troops.

    ‘the retreat degenerated into a rout’
    ‘the army was in a state of demoralization verging on rout’
    • ‘Not long after, what had started as a careful retreat on the part of the Union became a disorganized rout.’
    • ‘From there I was able to ship the film to London for transmission before the temporary Egyptian victory turned into a rout.’
    • ‘The Mongols were very far from their bases, and any reverse could quickly turn into a rout.’
    • ‘The doctor, bending over a wounded soldier, looked around and saw the rout beginning.’
    • ‘The situation came to a head in October 1917, with the rout of the Italian second army at Caporetto.’
    • ‘He turned, his numb and shaking legs turning his retreat into a disordered rout.’
    • ‘To Mike, he resembled a General observing the bloody rout of his foe.’
    • ‘A premature attack on Mountjoy's forces resulted in a rout by his cavalry and a long retreat back to Ulster through a hostile countryside.’
    • ‘In 1821 the Kakanfo's threat to Abomey and his capability to defend Oyo territory ended in his rout by the Dahomey army, and by 1830 Shabe had been razed and the cavalry no more to be seen.’
    • ‘This important national anniversary was associated with Charles II hiding in an oak tree at Boscobel after the rout of his army at Worcester in September 1651.’
    • ‘Their retreat had been a rout, and thousands of fleeing refugees, the elderly, women and children, had been slaughtered mercilessly.’
    • ‘Low morale among the soldiers had not been the cause of defeat, but it undoubtedly helped to turn defeat into rout.’
    • ‘We do not yet know whether different stages of a battle, such as the initial salvos, a fighting retreat and a rout, have different archaeological signatures.’
    • ‘The engagement is a rout and Nathan is captured.’
    • ‘For several days the troopers were forced to fall back in disgrace, Pelham's guns the only things keeping us from a spectacular rout.’
    • ‘The war ended in 1993 with the total rout of the Georgian army, and the flight of more than 200,000 Georgian and Mingrelian refugees into Georgia.’
    • ‘The Americans ran in total rout from the field, leaping over the stone walls off Lexington Green.’
    • ‘The rout is not a complete one, as the contingent of Lyran ships arrive in time to help cover the escape of the remains of the Lyrans' central attacking force.’
    • ‘The battle was turned into a rout as soldiers struggled to carry the king's body to the castle.’
    disorderly retreat, retreat, flight, headlong flight
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A decisive defeat.
      ‘the party lost more than half their seats in the rout’
      • ‘He blamed their electoral rout on the party MPs' neglect of their constituencies.’
      • ‘The rout began in the 18th minute when Blackburn scored the first of a three-goal salvo in nine minutes.’
      • ‘Australia eased to a second win at the World Cup with a 13-try rout against Romania.’
      • ‘Newry had further chances to complete the rout in the final five minutes of the match.’
      • ‘Minnesota's offense showed improvement last week, with their quarterback leading a rout of the Saints.’
      • ‘Despite her electoral rout, the masses, seduced by her silken eloquence into believing that Dr Karunanidhi and his men had been witch hunting her, stood solidly behind her.’
      • ‘That assist was Scholes's last contribution to what is becoming a rout.’
      • ‘Even while he was in the thick of the campaign, there were pointers to his party's rout in the 1991 General Election.’
      • ‘Not bothering to count, the referee halted the rout at 2: 51.’
      • ‘This Pacific division championship was followed by two decisive routs in the Canada West final four.’
      • ‘Hornets scored with their first attack of the second half and a rout looked likely.’
      • ‘So the shift toward Stoiber shows just how scared the CDU is of a rout in 2002.’
      • ‘With Cambridge finding it hard to settle into the game, a rout looked on the cards.’
      • ‘A goal by Ruud van Nistelrooy halted a rout at the Bernabeu.’
      • ‘In the meantime, the challenge will be to stave off complacency toward reform now that chances for a rout at the polls suddenly seem remote.’
      • ‘He's the one most likely to minimise an electoral rout.’
      • ‘Jamie Wood added a fifth, and substitute Matt Woolf completed the rout with his first-ever goal for the Wands.’
      • ‘Stradbally had opened in whirlwind fashion and had two goals on the scoreboard as an expected rout began.’
      • ‘He took the lead in offering major concessions to municipal reformers in a desperate effort to prevent a complete rout.’
      • ‘The home side dug deep to prevent an expected rout.’
      crushing defeat, overwhelming defeat, defeat, trouncing, annihilation
      View synonyms
  • 2Law
    dated An assembly of people who have made a move toward committing an illegal act that would constitute an offense of riot.

    1. 2.1archaic A disorderly or tumultuous crowd of people.
      ‘a rout of strangers ought not to be admitted’
  • 3archaic A large evening party or reception.

    • ‘I intend to live to be a hundred, and to go to ten thousand routs and balls, and to play cards every night of my life till the year eighteen hundred [it is currently 1712].’
    • ‘Which of the various routs and balls and musicales would afford her the best chance to find a husband?’
    • ‘Especially when grand balls, I'm not even mentioning the more intimate routs or soirées, are held just weeks apart.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Defeat and cause to retreat in disorder.

    ‘in a matter of minutes the attackers were routed’
    • ‘In France, Henry unexpectedly routs a vastly superior French army at Agincourt and wins the heart of a French princess.’
    • ‘In this game, you cannot charge regiments into another, although a combat formation is supposed to help increase your chances of routing the other unit.’
    • ‘He had excelled in every single mission that had been assigned to him, from routing bandits to training whole divisions of new recruits to aid in the war.’
    • ‘Routing those that came out of Capua against them, and thus procuring a quantity of proper soldiers' arms, they gladly threw away their own as barbarous and dishonourable.’
    • ‘Lord Mountjoy replaced him in Ireland, reducing the Gaelic chiefs to submission and routing a Spanish invasion force in 1601.’
    • ‘Distrust and self-interest made them stand by as they routed one army after another.’
    • ‘The Philistines fought a battle against Israel, and the men of Israel were routed, leaving their dead on Mount Gilboa.’
    • ‘The political power and territorial control of Muscovy expanded greatly under the four-decade reign of Ivan III, who died in 1505 after routing the Mongol armies.’
    • ‘Sensing that his armies would be routed, Ethelred conjured up a scheme to prevent them from facing the enemy head on.’
    • ‘The Federals, caught out of formation, were routed and were soon in retreat, abandoning their standards and hundreds of prisoners.’
    • ‘By the end of the war, living memorial advocates could claim a rhetorical victory, having routed their opponents, if only in pure word volume.’
    • ‘At the end the hero routs the heavy villain with a martial expertise.’
    • ‘‘We went from full-on desperation to routing the enemy in under ten minutes,’ I say, mostly to convince myself that that is what had occurred.’
    put to flight, put to rout, drive off, dispel, scatter
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • put to rout

    • Put to flight; defeat utterly.

      ‘I once put a gang to rout’
      • ‘The Foundation wants to put to rout what it sees as anti-west bias on college campuses.’
      • ‘This argument is soon put to rout by the assumption that if the remaining days of a centenarian are a mere repetition of yesterday, what delight can be derived from such a pitiable living?’
      • ‘A quick trip across the blogosphere immediately puts to rout the notion that Cosby's thoughts were either new or simply one half of a liberal/conservative schism.’
      • ‘I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life.’
      • ‘The ills of bias and discrimination have been put to rout.’

Origin

Middle English: ultimately based on Latin ruptus ‘broken’, from the verb rumpere; sense 1 and the verb ( late 16th century) are from obsolete French route, probably from Italian rotta ‘breakup of an army’; the other senses are via Anglo-Norman French rute.

Pronunciation

rout

/raʊt//rout/

Main definitions of rout in English

: rout1rout2

rout2

verb

  • 1with object Cut a groove, or any pattern not extending to the edges, in (a wooden or metal surface)

    ‘you routed each plank all along its length’
  • 2

    another term for root
  • 3North American with object Find or retrieve.

    ‘as I routed out the lantern, the telephone jangled’
    • ‘As a matter of fact, he was completely baffled on how to rout a person that wields luck.’
    • ‘To rout this pest, scientists at the labs from coast to coast are making the sharpshooter and the Xylella microbe the focus of ambitious new studies.’
    • ‘When the coalition routed the ALP to win office after 13 years in opposition, the party ran a brilliant, centrally conducted campaign.’
    • ‘They implored prelates to observe vigilantly all sacerdotal activities in order to secure the subservience of priests and to rout out rebels and rogues.’
    • ‘Weather looks like chance, but some think it's a malign force determined to rout them.’
    1. 3.1 Force (someone) from a place.
      ‘Simon routed him from the stables’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in rout (sense 2)): alteration of the verb root. rout (sense 1) dates from the early 19th century.

Pronunciation

rout

/rout//raʊt/