Definition of round in English:

round

adjective

  • 1Shaped like or approximately like a circle or cylinder.

    ‘she was seated at a small, round table’
    • ‘Each door has a small round window and on the walls hang life buoys.’
    • ‘Without really thinking about it, she drew a huge, round circle on the page.’
    • ‘Blake was sitting at one of the round tables, staring into thin air.’
    • ‘It is also a town with an impressive heritage - an ancient church and round tower and a large enclosed medieval castle, some of which has been re-roofed.’
    • ‘The Emperor Augustus had built a round shrine in front of it to put a Roman hallmark on Greece.’
    • ‘She had large, round gold earrings that she always wore.’
    • ‘A small " perfectly round hole " was found in the glass, which was crazed.’
    • ‘In the center was a perfectly round hole, also three-quarters of an inch.’
    • ‘I read each label on the round cylinders and the vials within.’
    • ‘I could see the fear etched across her small round face.’
    • ‘He takes off his small round glasses, wipes away the mist.’
    • ‘His eyes look huge behind those rosy round spectacles.’
    • ‘Ebony woke to see the morning sun light just coming through the small round window.’
    • ‘A faint light shone from the small round window on the door.’
    • ‘The 40 rooms are small round huts with thatched roofs rising to a central spire.’
    • ‘A small round table at one end and a book stand next to it.’
    • ‘The circle, on a hilltop setting, is nearly perfectly round, with a diameter of 33 m.’
    • ‘Marie was sitting at one of the small round tables surrounding the dance floor.’
    • ‘He saluted and adjusted his large round wire rimmed glasses.’
    • ‘In front of the fireplace sat a round card table, covered by a green cloth, and flanked by four plush, green leather upholstered wingback chairs.’
    circular, disc-shaped, disc-like
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    1. 1.1 Having a curved shape like part of the circumference of a circle.
      ‘round arches’
      • ‘Her hair was combed neatly, and her nails were nicely trimmed to make perfect round shapes.’
      • ‘Thick green grass lined a small, almost perfectly round curve along the bank of a stream, a small waterfall splashing softly thirty feet away.’
      • ‘The second floor was raised on round arches and supported a balcony resting on a row of buttresses forming an eaveslike projection.’
      • ‘Byzantine architecture is distinguished by its use of the round arch, cross, circle, dome, and rich mosaic ornament.’
      • ‘They slid into a round booth next to a French window.’
      • ‘She sat down on the rock and unbuckled her shoe which was black with a round toe and a chunky heel, rather like a boot that'd had the top cut off it.’
      • ‘This has a vaulted ceiling supported on round arches.’
  • 2Shaped like or approximately like a sphere.

    ‘a round glass ball’
    ‘the grapes are small and round’
    • ‘Some dolls had cloth bodies with a small round gourd, acorn, or apple for a head.’
    • ‘Baseball is more than round balls and base runs; it can also involve branding, design, and typography.’
    • ‘That day I had worn this thick cotton quilted coat and pants that my mother had made me, and I looked like a round snowball.’
    • ‘Then suddenly, he pulled the pinchers out, and in their serrated grasp was a perfectly round lead musket ball.’
    • ‘Tidily stacked on the shelves are round cabbages, stripped of their rough outer leaves, and a basket of glossy apples; bright seemly rotundities.’
    • ‘Slowly people left, and just as slowly the park darkened and the quaint round lanterns set around the circle flickered into life.’
    • ‘He reached into his pocket and brought forth a small round sphere.’
    • ‘As it opened a small round object rolled out of it.’
    • ‘It was round and spherical, with a deep groove on one side.’
    • ‘Elizabeth reached her arm out of the shop door and picked up a heavy, round stone.’
    • ‘Her words rise toward the surface in bright, round bubbles.’
    • ‘I mean, melons come in all shapes and sizes - are we talking about little round gala melons or bloody big watermelons here?’
    1. 2.1 (of a person's body) plump.
      • ‘Alex had naturally blond hair that was almost white, a perfect tan, a short and round frame that made her look chunky in certain outfits, and green eyes.’
      • ‘The round old man hurried to their side, eyeing the mix, taking a tentative mouthful of it.’
      • ‘An old man with white hair came waddling out of the cottage, followed by a plump, round woman with rosy cheeks.’
      • ‘Uncle August was married to my Aunt Avice, a pudgy and round sort of woman.’
      • ‘Richard Greene, a short, rather round man with thinning dirty-blonde hair, chuckled.’
      • ‘The rather round boy was identified as Paul and the freckly boy as Jake.’
      • ‘She wore baggy shirts and tight pants which only accentuated her round figure.’
      • ‘Mr. Roberts was very bald, very round, had very thick glasses, and looked very hungry.’
      • ‘Lennie is a big man with great strength; his body and features are round and undefined.’
      • ‘A genuinely happy and rather round nurse bustled over to her.’
      • ‘Sheriff T.C. Wynn was a tall, round man with thick, shaded glasses and jet black hair that was graying at his temples.’
      • ‘Josh Jones was a short, round man with a high-pitched voice and a constant grin.’
      • ‘The round man blinked and adjusted his small circular glasses.’
      • ‘Jasmine kissed him on his bruised lips and pressed as much of her round body against him as she could.’
      • ‘I thought of her round shape, her smiling eyes, and I couldn't help feeling warm inside.’
      • ‘His round body was only slightly taller than her own.’
      plump, chubby, fat, stout, rotund, roly-poly, fattish, portly, dumpy, chunky, broad in the beam, overweight, heavy, pot-bellied, beer-bellied, paunchy, falstaffian
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    2. 2.2 Having a curved surface with no sharp or jagged projections.
      ‘the boulders look round and smooth’
      • ‘Why are rocks found near rivers mostly smooth and round?’
      • ‘A large, round, smooth rock protruded suddenly a few feet past a break in the forest.’
      • ‘The catalyst comprises a support containing palladium and silver and having a uniformly round external surface.’
      • ‘I felt my hand being pressed against a smooth, round mound.’
  • 3(of a voice) rich and mellow; not harsh.

    • ‘‘I always like champagne in the afternoon,’ he informed me in his rich round voice.’
    • ‘He speaks this language like every other American, with a deep round voice that seems to come from somewhere below his knees.’
    • ‘She spoke without any apparent accent, in a round voice filled with soft vowels and smooth consonants.’
    sonorous, resonant, rich, full, full-toned, full-bodied, mellow, mellifluous, rounded, reverberant, orotund
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  • 4attributive (of a number) altered for convenience of expression or calculation, for example to the nearest whole number or multiple of ten or five.

    ‘the size of the fleet is given in round numbers’
    • ‘They were confused by our round sum of $25,000,000.’
    • ‘Can you put a round figure on the kind of government investment you're going to need to get this up and running?’
    • ‘We could easily have taken more - but I wanted a nice, round number.’
    • ‘Do you think the company could string things out long enough for the fine to reach a nice, round billion dollars?’
    • ‘However other American railways used different gauges. 4 foot 10 inches was popular, and in the South a round 5 foot was often used.’
    • ‘However, for the purposes of argument, let's stick with a million as a nice round figure.’
    • ‘The store manager saw on the daily transaction report that something was wrong, because it displayed an odd dollar amount rather than a round multiple of 20.’
    1. 4.1 Used to show that a figure has been completely and exactly reached.
      ‘a round dozen’
      • ‘His output under his own name reached a round 200 novels.’
      • ‘Strauss, who made a round 50 on Tuesday, was the only England batsman to pass 45 runs in the match.’
      • ‘The network of offices reached a round dozen this year.’
      complete, entire, whole, full, undivided, unbroken
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    2. 4.2archaic (of a sum of money) considerable.
      ‘his business is worth a round sum to me’
      • ‘As to the money raised by local subscription, no definite apportionment has yet been made but we understand that Woodhouse will receive a good round sum.’
  • 5(of a person or their manner of speaking) not omitting or disguising anything; frank and truthful.

    ‘she berated him in good round terms’
    candid, frank, direct, honest, truthful, straightforward, plain, plain-spoken, blunt, outspoken, forthright, downright, unvarnished, bald, straight from the shoulder, explicit, unequivocal
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noun

  • 1A circular piece of a particular substance.

    ‘cut the pastry into rounds’
    • ‘We rolled the huge rounds into the old wood shed.’
    • ‘All meals are accompanied with large rounds of flat bread.’
    • ‘Cannon says they were developed for adults to either snack on right out of the bag or use on a party tray with crackers or small bread rounds.’
    • ‘Wendy had bowls and soup spoons laid out, and gracing the center of the table was a large round of crusty bread, still warm from the oven.’
    • ‘I smiled and put a dozen hot kugel tarts, dense rounds of potato and salt and oil, to drain on a paper towel near her.’
    • ‘We started with the meat patty, as that was a simple round.’
    • ‘Working carefully, I slid a thin knife under the wax rounds, popping them off in one piece.’
    circle, disc, circlet
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    1. 1.1 A thick disk of beef cut from the haunch as a joint.
      • ‘Nutrient composition data are available for four lean cuts of bison: rib-eye, clod, top round and top sirloin.’
      • ‘Take a round of fresh beef (or the half of one if it is very large) and remove the bone.’
      • ‘I would appreciate some information on how to cook an inside round of beef using a slow cook method.’
  • 2An act of visiting each of a number of people or places.

    ‘she did the rounds of her family to say goodbye’
    ‘he made the rounds of the city's churches’
    • ‘As he did his rounds, he was enjoined to try a piece of pie here, have some cider there, some roast meat, some cake.’
    • ‘From there it was easy sneaking past the random guards making their rounds through the mansion.’
    • ‘Guards patrolled the floor around the grate, one of them made his round through the grate-lifting room, checking it frequently.’
    • ‘When he was 20, Lewis made the rounds of Nashville's country career-makers.’
    • ‘Sara made the rounds of a few of the commands around the perimeter of the valley, attending to last-minute details.’
    • ‘An energetic round of theatre visits kept her in touch with the latest in dramatic writing and performance.’
    • ‘He's been doing the rounds of the newspapers portraying himself as the victim of press intrusion into his private life, and discoursing on identity and being proud to be English.’
    • ‘For Dom, Kodak's capitulation proved to be the start of a busy round of newspaper and TV interviews for the IT contractor.’
    • ‘I made the rounds visiting all my friends and the new exhibit of the Pierre and Maria-Gaetana Matisse Collection.’
    • ‘His first night on the job the old night watchman gives him a tour, showing Martin the rounds he must make.’
    • ‘Intrigued, and in no particular rush I decided to talk to her before making my rounds of the town.’
    • ‘Many roads were damaged and the waste trucks were having a hard time making their rounds.’
    • ‘They had slipped away for a week in the Lake District, made the rounds of London society arm in arm.’
    • ‘He is making the rounds of all the mystery conventions, taking bows for his long and prosperous career, which may be winding down a bit after all these years.’
    • ‘Passing from room to room through a volley of slaps on the back, friendly kisses and a beer or two he did the rounds, drinking with friends and hiding from his family.’
    • ‘In fact, the officer classes seem to have been engaged in a constant round of visits.’
    • ‘I made the rounds of the cabin to see if any of the guys wanted to come with me and Dutchie.’
    • ‘He had put everything away in cupboards and drawers and he had not been back since the cleaning staff had made their rounds.’
    • ‘Rather than have a separate sales staff, Sun's 12,000 sales reps also will sell software on their rounds.’
    • ‘The patrollers generally made their rounds at night, with their activity and regularity differing according to time and place.’
    1. 2.1 A tour of inspection, typically repeated regularly, in which the safety or well-being of those visited is checked.
      ‘the doctor is just making his rounds in the wards’
      • ‘When on his rounds in the African hospital, he had been known to look at some minor injury to a hand or foot and then utter the dread words, ‘That will have to come off!’’
      • ‘The doctor is on his rounds now, and he can't waste any time.’
      • ‘Katherine forced herself to move and continue on her rounds, encouraging tired and listless men.’
      • ‘Her own father was a local doctor who would take her with him on his rounds.’
      • ‘She glanced up and down the hallway, checking for night nurses making their rounds.’
      • ‘That might include a doctor who takes her Tablet PC along for her morning rounds, an insurance agent, or even a package delivery person.’
      • ‘The other flight attendants continued making their rounds.’
      • ‘The residence staff does sick rounds at six thirty, and the breakfast bell rings at seven.’
      • ‘For as long as I could remember Doc Harris had been making his rounds in his trap with Lady, the grey mare.’
      • ‘The jingle of keys rings out as the guard makes his rounds.’
      circuit, beat, course, route
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  • 3One of a sequence of sessions or groups of related actions or events, typically such that development or progress can be seen between one group and another.

    ‘the two sides held three rounds of talks’
    • ‘In a second round of personal interviews, participants recalled critical incidents of using information from the Web.’
    • ‘The talks will be this year's third round of negotiations, and the 11 th overall.’
    • ‘They held a third round of talks in Beijing last week.’
    • ‘Investment in education in general, and in particular school education would play a vital role in the next round of development.’
    • ‘Individual politicians can never be held responsible for falling policies, due to the endless rounds of talks that precede decisions in which all parties, more or less have to agree in the end.’
    • ‘Even more to the point, it makes you wonder how on earth it got past the usual film-industry round of development meetings and off the ground.’
    • ‘The senior officials have so far held three rounds of preparatory meetings this year.’
    • ‘The six nations agreed to hold the next round of talks in early November in Beijing.’
    • ‘His first move will be to inject energy into the round of global trade negotiations that was launched last November in Doha, Qatar.’
    • ‘It comes on the heels of a successful November launch of a new round of global trade talks.’
    • ‘A new round of global trade negotiations is moving closer to being launched, as the six-day ministerial meeting in Doha draws to a close.’
    • ‘Australia and Singapore have begun a second round of bilateral trade talks in Canberra, and are aiming to sign a free trade pact by the end of the year.’
    • ‘Mandela believed agreement would be reached in the next, final round of negotiations in July.’
    spell, period, time, stretch, stint, turn, run, session, cycle
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    1. 3.1 A division of a contest such as a boxing or wrestling match.
      • ‘Worse than that is when Taylor prevents the timekeeper from ending the round during the big fight.’
      • ‘Haley and I sat on the swings, while Chad and Dominic continued their tiebreaker round of wrestling.’
      • ‘I won one of the rounds, but she outscored me in the end.’
      • ‘He looked tattered and damp, as if he'd just done ten rounds of mud wrestling.’
      • ‘He and Jones knew each other from way back and had fought some close rounds as amateurs.’
      contest, match, heat, competition, tournament, event, meeting, meet, fixture, game
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    2. 3.2 One of a succession of stages in a sporting contest or other competition, in each of which more candidates are eliminated.
      ‘the playoffs in the second round’
      • ‘The tournament will have five rounds, one on the Thursday evening, two on the Friday (morning and evening), one on the Saturday and one on the Sunday.’
      • ‘I didn't get past the second round so my last song was never performed.’
      • ‘The competition consists of three rounds: preliminary, semi-final and final.’
      • ‘As many as twenty six rounds of negotiations were held between the Akali Dal and the government.’
      • ‘In the first round of the play-offs they faced the Oakland Athletics.’
      • ‘It had been rather emotional for those groups that were eliminated in the second round.’
      • ‘Five ‘semi-finalists’ were chosen to move into the second round of the demolition derby.’
      • ‘Up to eighteen pianists will advance to the semifinal round, where each will present a program of no more than twenty minutes.’
      • ‘In 2002 they reached the fourth round of the qualifiers against Kerry, and felt like they had finally arrived.’
      • ‘We feel sure that we've made it into the next round of the competition.’
      • ‘Town's passage follows that of Harrogate Railway Athletic, who also reached the third qualifying round 24 hours earlier.’
      • ‘The Warriors will face the host team from York this morning before moving on to tomorrow's elimination round.’
      • ‘This is the first round where the contestants are partnerless.’
      • ‘As mentioned last week, we still don't have a clear third place winner for this round of the contest.’
      • ‘Shelbourne is the first Irish league team to reach the final qualifying round since the beginning of the competition.’
      • ‘The women went into Sunday's playoff round pleased with their overall play.’
      • ‘The first time he entered, he was eliminated after the first round.’
      • ‘But all the same, it was a win and it guaranteed Wilson a spot in the next round.’
      • ‘After that, we'll play in the first round of the conference tournament.’
      stage, level
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    3. 3.3 An act of playing all the holes in a golf course once.
      ‘Eileen enjoys the occasional round of golf’
      • ‘A round of gold at Erinvale Golf Course, at the foothills of the Helderberg Mountains, is unmissable.’
      • ‘Brennan said that while most GPs like to think they are not being influenced, the reality was that a meal or a round of golf did influence their choices.’
      • ‘They will play four rounds of golf in one day.’
      • ‘The lead seesawed between the two of them for much of the round, before John went ahead to stay after the 16th hole of the round.’
      • ‘We play the last round of the reunion tour golf championship.’
      • ‘It's perfect for kids - or kids at heart who don't have time to play a full 18-hole round.’
      • ‘The trips involved an overnight stay, a meal and a round of golf.’
      • ‘So much business has been conducted over a round of golf that it's almost cliche.’
      • ‘In certain instances students met with their industry mentors while playing a round of golf.’
      • ‘They just showed up once a quarter for a round of golf and a casual perusal of the books.’
      • ‘I like to play a round of golf, to potter around the garden, and visit markets.’
      • ‘The Old Head is one of the most expensive courses in Ireland: green fees are €250 for a round of golf.’
      • ‘One weekend, a group of friends decide that they aren't going to play the usual round of golf.’
      • ‘The Scot began yesterday's round with a par that gave no indication of what was to come.’
      • ‘Anyone who has played a round of golf will know how delays can frustrate anyone's best day on the links.’
      • ‘Once the round of golf is over, the brothers can relax in the hotel's leisure complex.’
      • ‘He had been to the club, got in a round of golf, had an excellent buffet breakfast, and then headed home.’
      • ‘A horse riding excursion through the New Forest can also be arranged as can a round of golf on the nine-hole course or on one of the ten nearby courses.’
      • ‘But he is also described as a ‘personable’ guy who enjoys a round of golf and a drink.’
      • ‘Although he was about to turn 90, he looked trim and fit and boasted he had just returned from a robust round of golf at a nearby course.’
  • 4A regularly recurring sequence of activities or functions.

    ‘their lives were a daily round of housework and laundry’
    • ‘She is doing a little royal work and doing it well, but will not take on a full-time round of royal engagements.’
    • ‘For expats, life's an endless round of parties.’
    • ‘Festivities at Christmas, Easter, and May Day, at the end of ploughing and the completion of harvest, relieved the monotony of the daily round of labor.’
    • ‘Because my memory is so terrible, sometimes I want to write about a certain part of the daily round so I won't forget about it.’
    succession, sequence, series, cycle
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    1. 4.1 A set of drinks bought for all the members of a group, typically as part of a sequence in which each member in turn buys such a set.
      ‘it's my round’
      • ‘After a few more rounds of drinks, I began to get lightheaded and figured I'd better stop drinking.’
      • ‘After a few rounds of the sugary drink, the girls got quite giggly and decided that what we really needed was a game of Truth or Dare.’
      • ‘I'll even promise a round of drinks for the staff the next time I'm in London.’
      • ‘Though she wasn't drinking anything harder than mineral water, Isabelle took her turn in buying a round of drinks.’
      • ‘He walked smoothly towards the bar to get another round of drinks.’
      • ‘She distracted Annie from more questions by ordering around round of drinks for everyone.’
      • ‘We order a round of drinks and then I head out to the dance floor.’
      • ‘Anyone joining a group of drinkers immediately buys a round of drinks for everyone at the table.’
      • ‘Buying a round of drinks can get pretty steep sometimes.’
      • ‘Whenever someone has money, they invite their friends to go out to a neighborhood bar for a round of drinks.’
      • ‘After the revolution, newly hired workers no longer had to buy a round of drinks for their mates, and they no longer drank in honor of their bosses.’
      • ‘They called over the bartender and ordered a round of beers.’
      • ‘Betty walked over to give Jess and Phoebe their next round of drinks.’
      • ‘We park ourselves at the bar and order another round of drinks.’
      • ‘Andrew was at the bar, ordering a round of drinks for them all.’
      • ‘One group had gone through a couple of rounds of pints in the time that it had taken him to get served.’
      • ‘I went over to them and said, ‘I apologise’, and I bought them a round of drinks.’
      • ‘Another round of drinks and she was stumbling around with the rest of them.’
      • ‘Hopefully, one of them will buy the first round of drinks.’
      • ‘She can't go blabbing out secrets after the third round of drinks.’
  • 5Music
    A song for three or more unaccompanied voices or parts, each singing the same theme but starting one after another, at the same pitch or in octaves; a simple canon.

    • ‘Its ancestry is in the madrigal, the round, the glee (which fostered numerous glee clubs), and the partsong.’
    • ‘The same loop has been started at different times on each monitor, in the manner of a ceaseless musical round, or canon.’
    • ‘We sang songs in rounds, back and forth with our own echoes.’
    • ‘Their older brothers and sisters performed the Jewish song Shalom Chaverim, sung as a round.’
    • ‘The a cappella style of vocals that sit on top of each other is like listening to a band whose main musical influences are the playground rhymes and infant school rounds rather than actual songs.’
  • 6The amount of ammunition needed to fire one shot.

    • ‘In the initial 30 seconds I would say that a hundred rounds were fired at the crowd.’
    • ‘The directional pad is used for zooming in on targets, and the trigger buttons fire rounds of ammunition.’
    • ‘What impresses them is if I go out to my balcony in the middle of the night and fire off three rounds from my rifle.’
    • ‘From a distance of about six feet, he aims the shotgun at Danny's side and fires off a round.’
    • ‘His father fired a few rounds into the plastic dummy.’
    • ‘The rate of fire for the gun was 250-300 rounds per minute.’
    • ‘The pilot directs the vehicle, and the gunner has a full 360° control of the turret which can either fire machine gun rounds, or mortars.’
    • ‘In 1885, Maxim developed a single-barrel weapon that could fire 500 rounds of ammunition a minute.’
    • ‘Three hand grenades, four revolvers, one rifle and 150 rounds of ammunition had been found.’
    • ‘All the men were dressed in fatigues, and carried side arms and carried a number of rounds for the side arms as well as the rifles that they carried.’
    • ‘So she angled the gun around the corner and fired several rounds before she heard the man go down.’
    • ‘My gun snapped up, and I squeezed off a quick burst of silenced rounds even before his gun was halfway up.’
    • ‘We shot several rounds of high-explosive ammunition into the area.’
    • ‘Then, suddenly, there is a different sound - the gut-churning crack of live rounds being fired.’
    • ‘Julie raised her gun and fired off a few rounds at the men above.’
    • ‘Insurgents spotted the jam and launched three mortar rounds.’
    • ‘You can even attempt to subdue a suspect by flashing your badge or firing a couple of rounds into the air in hopes of scaring the sucker into compliance.’
    • ‘The 8th Air Force had fired 99 million rounds of ammunition during these flights and it is thought that 20,000 German planes were destroyed.’
    • ‘I have been to a gun club and I have fired off rounds for kicks.’
    • ‘This was a large calibre assault rifle which could fire up to 1200 rounds per minute.’
    bullet, cartridge, shell, shot
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    1. 6.1Archery A fixed number of arrows shot from a fixed distance.
      • ‘She did a whole round of arrows, perfect shots every single time - straight to the bull's eye.’

adverb

British

preposition

British

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Pass and go around (something) so as to move on in a changed direction.

    ‘the ship rounded the cape and sailed north’
    • ‘We rounded the curve, and the corridor came to an abrupt halt.’
    • ‘‘Remember if you need anything, just ask Christa,’ he called to Jared before rounding the house.’
    • ‘By the end of the third day, the ship had rounded the cape.’
    • ‘She moved through an office door and rounded the corner to the employee lounge.’
    • ‘They rounded a bend and saw pale light at the end of the vent.’
    • ‘As I rounded yet another bend in the road, the wind picked up.’
    • ‘Turning to the street, he saw another cab rounding the corner.’
    • ‘The soldiers rounded the corner and stopped in front of the party.’
    • ‘Another group of policemen round a corner to find a car alarm blaring and a window smashed, with the cause of the mayhem nowhere to be found.’
    • ‘Johnson wrapped the game up when he beat the offside trap and rounded the keeper.’
    • ‘Jack and Angela rounded the corner three blocks away from their houses.’
    • ‘There was something willowy in the way she swung her slender hips the slightest bit as she rounded a table.’
    • ‘He dribbled past three French players, before rounding the goalkeeper to score.’
    • ‘Through the kitchen door, I see her round the bottom of the stairs and lean against the banister.’
    • ‘A moment later, the vehicle appeared, rounding a curve up ahead.’
    • ‘They passed the great papyrus swamps the next day and rounded the point which marked the edge of the Canopus mouth of the Nile.’
    • ‘He looked up at Emily, who was now rounding the table towards him.’
    • ‘Then the carriage began to move, and he lost sight of her as they rounded a bend.’
    • ‘As we rounded a curve, a truck weaved halfway into our lane.’
    • ‘The older couple glanced at them all, then proceeded down the corridor, rounding the corner as they walked to the elevators.’
    go round, move round, travel round, sail round, circumnavigate
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  • 2Alter (a number) to one less exact but more convenient for calculations.

    ‘we'll round the weight up to the nearest pound’
    ‘the committee rounded down the figure’
    ‘let's just round it off to an even ten dollars’
    • ‘This bracket will be rounded down to the nearest $50 for joint returns and head of household returns.’
    • ‘Under the act, prices for such items as television licences and permits have to be rounded down to the nearest convenient amount below the exact euro equivalent.’
    • ‘We rounded down, so the worst loss is also the net loss.’
    • ‘Round the result to the nearest 10 points (numbers ending in 5 are rounded upwards).’
    • ‘Converting to inches and rounding up, footing dimensions of 14 X 14 inches will be adequate.’
    • ‘Thus, using this value is a bit like rounding off your own weight to the nearest hundred pounds.’
    • ‘It was prespecified that stock market figures would be rounded up or down as appropriate.’
    • ‘Income and gains should be rounded down to the nearest pound, while tax credits and deductions should be rounded up to the nearest pound.’
    • ‘What pure scientific purpose is served by rounding the number up to 100,000?’
    • ‘Oracle wants customers to multiply the number of processors cores in a system by .75 and then round up to the next whole number regardless of the fraction.’
    • ‘In writing down the score, all scores are divided by 10 with fractions rounded down.’
  • 3Give a round shape to.

    ‘a lathe that rounded chair legs’
    • ‘To deepen the stretch, slowly extend arms and round spine forward, letting the weight of the torso fall forward.’
    1. 3.1no object Become circular in shape.
      ‘her eyes rounded in dismay’
      • ‘‘What do you mean?’ she asked, her blue eyes, rounding in question.’
      • ‘I muttered under my breath, my almond shaped eyes rounding to replicate saucers.’
    2. 3.2Phonetics Pronounce (a vowel) with the lips narrowed and protruded.
      • ‘She speaks very fast, with a Spanish accent that rounds her vowels.’
      • ‘Most Australians can achieve this accent by ‘rounding the vowels’ and concentrating on speaking ‘properly’.’
      • ‘If he rounds his vowels a bit more his accent will drop.’

Usage

On the difference in use between round and around, see around

Phrases

  • in the round

    • 1(of sculpture) standing free with all sides shown, rather than carved in relief against a ground.

      • ‘Whether in reliefs or figures carved in the round, he achieved dramatic expression of emotion through the intense faces, emphatic gestures, and cascading draperies of his figures.’
      • ‘Also carved in the round is a seated female figure just over one inch in height.’
      • ‘They are not sculpture in the round, but the pieces can be viewed from either side.’
      • ‘Standing just 36 cm high, and carved in the round, the model for the Queen Charlotte's figurehead is a tour de force of the woodcarver's art, although its maker's name is as yet unknown.’
      • ‘The turn from relief to sculpture in the round led to radical changes in his work.’
      1. 1.1Treated fully and thoroughly; with all aspects shown or considered.
        ‘to understand social phenomena one must see them in the round’
        • ‘His worldly-wise, amused, delicately cynical narrators observe characters in the round, identifying qualities that edify but which are muddied by foibles, peccadilloes, and, once in a while, mortal sins.’
        • ‘However, the person's conduct must also be considered in context and in the round.’
        • ‘All the evidence should have been looked at in the round.’
        • ‘The adjudicator must look at all of the material in the round and see whether he is persuaded of the claim.’
        • ‘The process must be viewed in the round, and not on a pupil by pupil basis, and chambers may well see an advantage in developing close relationships with pupils who plan to practise as employed barristers or to practise overseas.’
        • ‘But where there is any element of ambiguity the inquiry must look at all relevant facts and circumstances in the round.’
        • ‘When taken in the round, then, it is clear that the case for small farms is a strong one, and must be made loudly and persistently if the rural economy is to change for the better.’
        • ‘The governments in the past have not had much of an appetite for dealing with things in the round.’
        • ‘Taken in the round, this project has shown that sustainable farming really can work, even in the most hostile conditions.’
        • ‘The question of exceptional circumstances must therefore be considered in the round.’
    • 2(of a theatrical performance) with the audience placed on at least three sides of the stage.

      • ‘Played in the round and without an interval, it is harrowing but it is also a totally engrossing piece of theatre.’
      • ‘Like most plays, it loses by being presented in the round.’
      • ‘The director presented one of the few instances in my life where theatre in the round has succeeded.’
      • ‘Theatre in the round, opera in the park and lunchtime concerts in the workplace are all examples of venues that can transform and regenerate the whole experience of performance.’
      • ‘Because of the vagaries of Irish weather the opera is performed in a five hundred-seater marquee with a central stage, making it opera in the round.’
      • ‘The opera will be performed in the round, in two acts with an hour-long interval to allow for picnics on the lawn or a stroll through the gardens of the Georgian mansion.’
      • ‘This show would be fun when seated in the round, in a smaller space, with a drink in hand.’
      • ‘Theatre, in the round, is not my favourite venue for an evening's entertainment but, after last night, I begin to realise how effective it can be when it is under control of a man who knows how to handle it to its maximum advantage’
      • ‘The play was done in the company's Bingham Theatre, which is in the round, the hardest kind of space for a stage director to work in.’
      • ‘Some of the ballets were designed to be danced in the round, and that is incredible training for a dancer.’
  • round about

    • 1On all sides or in all directions; surrounding someone or something.

      ‘everything round about was covered with snow’
      • ‘Pray, Mrs. Tremlett, do you know any thing about the factory people that work in all these great ugly buildings round about Ashleigh?’
      • ‘Already he could clearly discern the treetops round about him; but it was in vain that his eye sought the view of the old brown church tower and the weather-worn roofs.’
      • ‘Besides these, there are the urban and suburban wanderers, or those who follow some itinerant occupation in and round about the large towns.’
      • ‘He promptly erected an altar from the stones round about, then dedicated the fat, entrails and head of the stag to Artemis and burned the animal as a holocaust.’
      • ‘They have set up night schools in villages round about to offer education suitable for rural life, rather than the alien curriculum offered by official schools.’
      • ‘Now they are crowded round about us, trying to get a grandstand view.’
      • ‘Outside the Asian school, waiting to pick up the consul's children, he feels the street go still, the shops round about go dead.’
      • ‘He was no hearty admirer of the Cambridge landscape - in the poem he avoids it with some ingenuity and confines himself to the names of the villages round about.’
      • ‘Thy wife shall be as a fruitful vine by the side of thine house; thy children like olive plants round about thy table.’
      • ‘Alternatively, the hill forts may have been community storage facilities for grain and livestock, a trading centre, and perhaps a ritual focus, with the important people living round about.’
    • 2At a point or time approximately equal to.

      ‘they arrived round about nine’
      • ‘It was round about this time that Haydn was able to see some of his works which he praised highly, citing the young composer as an ‘outstanding talent’.’
      • ‘We're also getting a significant amount of money from industry, probably round about the same as the government's putting in, $20-million or so.’
      • ‘Some of the reviewers when the book appeared seemed to find evidence for a sudden conversion round about 1934, but his disgust for earthly things is displayed over and over again in his early novels.’
      • ‘He has often been supposed to be the ‘Fair Youth’ of Shakespeare's Sonnets, most of which may well have been written round about 1593-6, though they may have been revised and reordered around 1602.’
      • ‘Bringing in round about $2m annually, tourism has contributed the most to the economy's scant prosperity.’
      • ‘On their third dive, round about 3pm, they headed off together and were last spotted swimming calmly 12m down.’
      • ‘I set the hotel clock to wake us up round about 7 ‘o’ clock.’
      • ‘If you take a trip down to Cornwall round about now you'll find that many of the county's resorts and tourist attractions, far from suffering a foot and mouth-induced tourist drain, are flourishing.’
      • ‘If any such deal is in the offing, expect it round about the time shareholders need an extra boost.’
      • ‘The telephone rang at round about half-past three in the morning.’
      approximately, about, around, roughly, in the neighbourhood of, in the area of, of the order of, just about, something like, more or less, as near as dammit to, close to, near to, practically
      View synonyms
      1. 2.1Approximately.
        ‘we raised round about half a million dollars’
        ‘round about 10,000 homes were affected’
        • ‘The budget that the Commissioner manages is round about £2.5 billion.’
        • ‘Bringing in round about $2m annually, tourism has contributed the most to the economy's prosperity.’
        • ‘The limiting factor is clearly the interface but at round about 1GB per minute, the transfer speed is reasonable.’
        • ‘Round about 1.35 million sheep were exported or moved during the month of February.’
        • ‘Only round about seven per cent of those who have horses or have access to horses ride to hounds.’
        • ‘The backlog of claims, I think, is down to round about 10,000.’
        • ‘The total area is probably about 30,000 square miles and the total population round about 200,000.’
        • ‘They have been made what we think is a generous offer, round about a ten per cent increase in pay over two years.’
        • ‘For the same car, but with circa 40k on the clock, you'd be looking at round about 24k from a dealer, but I'd be inclined to try to push that down a bit.’
        • ‘He replied that the Government was increasing investment "by round about half-a-billion pounds over the next few years".’
        • ‘By comparison for example, the hydrocarbon business is growing at round about 2% per annum.’
        • ‘The amount the government spends on the NHS is round about two-thirds of that in France and Germany and half of what the USA spends, as a percentage of our national income.’
        roughly, about, around, just about, or so, or thereabouts, more or less, in the neighbourhood of, in the region of, in the area of, in the vicinity of, of the order of, something like, give or take, give or take a few, in round numbers, rounded down, rounded up
        View synonyms
  • make (or go) the rounds

    • (of a story or joke) be passed on from person to person.

      • ‘There was a story going the rounds about one of the European shift bosses who was invited to the Lewises for lunch, to sample one of Jane's home made Cornish pasties.’
      • ‘I'd like to know because it was certainly a story that went the rounds among schoolboys in my day.’
      • ‘There was, inevitably, a lot of gossip going the rounds, mostly amongst the wives.’
      • ‘A story went the rounds of one agent who went to a café and asked for a café noir - this was a mistake, because a café noir was the only kind available, milk being rationed, and his ‘cover’ was blown.’
      • ‘There was another story going the rounds, concerning Don Venus.’
      • ‘The stories of intimidation and straightforward fraud are still going the rounds.’
      • ‘However, a rumour went the rounds in November 1870 that he had recently married.’
      • ‘However if only half of what is going the rounds right now has even a semblance of credence to it then it would seem that there are problems to be ironed out.’
      • ‘However, there are also contrary rumors going the rounds.’
      • ‘The latest Churchill story going the rounds has to do with a stuffy young Foreign Office secretary who had the job of ‘vetting’ the then Prime Minister's magnificent speeches.’
      spread, be passed around, get around, go the rounds
      View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • round something off

    • 1Make the edges or corners of something smooth.

      ‘round off the spars with a soft plastic fitting’
      • ‘Serrations on the rear of the sight blade reduce glare, and the blade edges have been rounded off.’
      • ‘I tested the tip of one, but evidently they were purely aesthetic, the tips and edges were rounded off so that they couldn't possibly harm anyone.’
      • ‘The sharp edges, corners and points have been rounded off and smoothed away.’
      • ‘One nice thing about this case is that all of the edges are rounded off, you'd be hard pressed to find a place where you could cut yourself without really trying.’
      • ‘The triggerguards were rounded off, and both the forward edge of the guards and the grip areas were stippled to give a surface that's tacky to the hand but allows fabric to slide over smoothly.’
      • ‘The square edges will be rounded off to prevent further damage to the wall.’
      smooth off, plane off, sand off, level off
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Complete something in a satisfying or suitable way.
        ‘I rounded off my visit to Ganu by purchasing a number of exquisite masks’
        • ‘After a highly enjoyable day sightseeing, we decided to round things off with a pub meal before going home.’
        • ‘I have a glass of excellent ‘house’ Chardonnay - fruity and smooth - to accompany the meal, and round it off with the peach schnapps trifle, which proves to have a real kick.’
        • ‘Afterwards members enjoyed a round of golf and the evening was rounded off with refreshments in the clubhouse afterwards.’
        • ‘The evening was rounded off by some lovely string music.’
        • ‘Both these puddings turned out to be a superb way of rounding the meal off.’
        • ‘I rounded the meal off with a cup of really excellent, fragrant coffee - refilled without me having to ask.’
        • ‘Often the tour is rounded off at the souvenir/tuck shop, getting those essential presents to bring home.’
        • ‘The first group of children to complete the course before Christmas rounded it off with a small party and seven new children started on January 12.’
        • ‘With a combination of acrylic, watercolour and photographic work, his diverse collection is rounded off by a self-made video, adding an eerie auditory aspect to the exhibit.’
        • ‘The fun gets under way at 3pm and will run on till 9pm when the day will be rounded off with a disco.’
        complete, finish off, crown, cap, top off, conclude, close, bring to a close, bring to a end, end
        View synonyms
  • round on

    • Make a sudden verbal attack on or unexpected retort to.

      ‘she rounded on me angrily’
      • ‘He kicked-started the campaign by rounding on opponents of the single currency.’
      • ‘Instead, he preferred to highlight the positive aspects of the game, often rounding on criticism of the domestic game that appeared in print.’
      • ‘Mr. Archer offered to explain, but Anthony rounded on him and declared in a sudden outburst that he would say it himself.’
      • ‘I was dismayed to hear the bishops rounding on the First Minister last week for speaking in support of the idea.’
      • ‘My mother once rounded on me for saying something would be ‘such a bore’.’
      • ‘At the meeting other councillor rounded on dog owners for not being responsible and discussed the matter of faeces.’
      • ‘Stevens said he had been drinking and saw someone push or punch his then girlfriend and when he saw her rounding on Mr Owen he joined in.’
      • ‘The guilty will defend by rounding on the accuser, and for that reason I expect to be chastised for the audacity to doubt their value, although some do good work.’
      • ‘‘You're not even supposed to be driving,’ she snapped, rounding on him.’
      • ‘In any case, the government's reaction - hysterically rounding on the Opposition - seems inexplicable.’
      snap at, attack, turn on, set upon, weigh into, fly at, let fly at, lash out at, hit out at, lambaste
      View synonyms
  • round something out

    • Make something more complete.

      ‘round out the meal with fruit and salad’
      • ‘The waiter did mention that this stew-like dish wasn't served with any accompaniment, and although it was satisfying I sort of missed rice or potatoes to round it out.’
      • ‘I learned as a teenager that if I wanted to lie convincingly and successfully, I had only to believe the lie fervently enough, to round it out in my mind with all attendant details, to give it a primary reality.’
      • ‘To round things out, add a delicious fall salad and scrumptious pumpkin cheesecake.’
      • ‘The tartar sauce had a zippy, homemade taste to it, and both our plates were rounded out well with green salads and ample servings of perfectly nice fries.’
      • ‘The supplements are rounded out by a trailer and TV spot.’
      • ‘If you have a full-bodied soup - that is, one that is thick with vegetables and rice or pasta and a bit of meat - you have a meal, which only needs some crusty whole grain bread to round it out.’
      • ‘The meatless concoctions were rounded out by lentil salad and yellow split peas cooked with turmeric, ginger and onions.’
      • ‘There's also a subtle humour to the film that rounds it out nicely.’
      • ‘Even a short post-script with thoughts on Lincoln's legacy would have rounded the book out nicely.’
      • ‘I missed out on a couple of the facts I'd learnt last night, which would have been good to throw in to round things out.’
      expand, enlarge, add to, round out, elaborate, add detail to, add substance to, flesh out, add flesh to, put flesh on the bones of
      View synonyms
  • round someone/something up

    • 1Drive or collect a number of people or animals together for a particular purpose.

      ‘in the afternoon the cows are rounded up for milking’
      • ‘What if they have been rounded up, to be sold as slaves?’
      • ‘I know monkeys and animals are rounded up or bred away from their natural habitats and countries for experiments in the pursuit of profit.’
      • ‘Dogs are banned from streets, parks and other public places and if seen outside, they will be rounded up and killed.’
      • ‘Sheep are wandering all over the moors in search of the best grazing, making it almost impossible for shepherds to round them up and encouraging more farmers to take advantage of higher lamb prices and sell up, meaning even fewer sheep.’
      • ‘The animals will be rounded up and sold at auction.’
      • ‘Througout the day, a total of one hundred horses were rounded up.’
      • ‘Texas cowboys watched over cattle, branded them, and rounded them up before herding them to markets first in New Orleans and by the 1850s northward to Missouri and beyond.’
      • ‘Eventually the ghetto is closed and the remaining inhabitants are rounded up and crammed onto livestock carriages bound for the camps.’
      • ‘The neighbourhood could get together to identify the resident cats and any strays could be rounded up and turned over to the S.P.C.A.’
      • ‘Entire families will be rounded up to settle political scores or personal grudges.’
      gather together, herd together, drive together, bring together, muster, marshal, rally, assemble, collect, group
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Arrest a number of people.
        • ‘That slaying remains such a tinderbox issue that the police and prosecutors only reluctantly confirmed for the first time today that some 12 suspects had been rounded up this month and more arrests were pending.’
        • ‘Eventually she and her other two brothers were rounded up by the police for interrogation by the usual methods, but this is only hinted at, not described.’
        • ‘Though the police has not shown their arrest in official records, however, sources in the police claimed that the suspects have been rounded up for their involvement in some other criminal cases.’
        • ‘There were dramatic pictures that came out of there, of the police rounding these people up.’
        • ‘The 24 other suspects were rounded up after his interrogation.’
        • ‘According to an Associated Press report, about 100 people had been rounded up, with some of the raids directly involving CIA and FBI agents.’
        • ‘Several dozen suspects had been rounded up since the weekend.’
        • ‘Dozens of riot police rounded them up and put them in vans.’
        • ‘At least five suspects have been rounded up but it is still not clear who is responsible.’
        • ‘The usual suspects were rounded up, with no result.’
        gather together, herd together, drive together, bring together, muster, marshal, rally, assemble, collect, group
        View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from the Old French stem round-, from a variant of Latin rotundus ‘rotund’.

Pronunciation

round

/raʊnd//round/