Main definitions of roe in English

: roe1roe2ROE3

roe1

noun

  • 1The mass of eggs contained in the ovaries of a female fish or shellfish, typically including the ovaries themselves, especially when ripe and used as food.

    • ‘Thousands of tons of lumpfish are harvested for their roe and urchins for their gonads - both products prized on the Asian market.’
    • ‘You need smoked cod's roe, which many good fishmongers sell.’
    • ‘The state of California encouraged the fledgling industry in the 1970s when a lucrative market was found for sea urchin roe in Japan.’
    • ‘Increasing in popularity; the most affordable sturgeon roe has a small grain similar to Russian Sevruga.’
    • ‘These boats stay on the water, processing fish as they're caught and dumping the roe from each fish into basins marked ‘beluga’ ‘osetra’ and ‘sevruga’.’
    • ‘Whereas pollock roe could be sold within a relatively short period of time, the rest of the production mainly consisted of finished fillets.’
    • ‘A rice porridge called ciporosayo was prepared by adding salmon roe to boiled grains.’
    • ‘Sturgeons have been prized for their roe since ancient times, and markets for caviar have increased rapidly in recent years.’
    • ‘The fish was poached in seaweed and served warm with a tomato concassé, caper berries and finished off with herring roe and a little wasabi.’
    • ‘I tried both the delicate, unsalty gravadlax and a tartare served with the roe and a very lemony asparagus salad.’
    1. 1.1 The ripe testes of a male fish, especially when used as food.
      • ‘Add the sake to the codfish soft roe and mix to combine.’

Origin

Late Middle English: related to Middle Low German, Middle Dutch roge.

Pronunciation

roe

/roʊ//rō/

Main definitions of roe in English

: roe1roe2ROE3

roe2

(also roe deer)

noun

  • A small Eurasian deer which lacks a visible tail and has a reddish summer coat that turns grayish in winter.

    • ‘The reserve is home to not only goats, red deer, and boars but also brown bears, chamois, lynx, roe deer, and wolves, as well as numerous eagles and large vultures called lammergeiers.’
    • ‘He had seen nothing save roe deer and a few hares out feeding amid the early evening shadows.’
    • ‘There have been sightings of roe deer in Bolton town centre, water voles on the streets of Wigan and bats in Manchester city centre.’
    • ‘She reminded Graham of the mother roe deer he sometimes saw hiding in the hedgerow as he cycled along.’
    • ‘New tools and weapons were invented to hunt the animals of the forests such as red deer, roe deer, wild boar, and cattle.’
    • ‘The early miniature pinscher was called the reh pinscher, so named because Germans thought the dog resembled the small, nimble, red roe deer that populated their forests.’
    • ‘They preyed on roe deer, red deer, and wild boar, but were also much loathed and dreaded for their depredations against livestock, especially sheep.’
    • ‘A mixture of alder, cherry, oak and other native species has attracted red squirrels as well as roe deer, hares and kingfishers.’
    • ‘The roe deer lives in southern Armenia and is readily fed upon by the leopard.’
    • ‘At the end of the Anglo-Saxon period they were pursuing red deer and roe deer, animals which are all but absent in earlier bone assemblages.’
    • ‘The springtime calling of frogs had given way to the chirping of crickets and the distant barks of rutting roe deer.’
    • ‘The only species occurring in East Lancashire is the roe deer.’
    • ‘Wolf, roe deer and wild boar roam these mountains and in the spring the capercaillie, king of the forest, screams his mating call.’
    • ‘Mammals such as weasels, foxes, stoats and especially roe deer can wander safely without the risk of being killed by traffic.’
    • ‘I was walking through the reserve the other day counting butterflies for the Trust and, lo and behold, I saw this young roe deer.’
    • ‘Close to the thigh bone, archaeologists found a group of butchered Mesolithic animal bones, including aurochs, roe deer and otter.’
    • ‘Hunters, in organised groups of three to four people, will be allowed to shoot mouflons, wild boars, roes, red deer and fallow deer at Christmas.’
    • ‘Within an hour of setting off, he had shot a roe deer, skinned and cleaned it.’
    • ‘Roe Lee (the old name may have been lea) means fields where roe deer roamed.’
    • ‘He said the island is inhabited by hundreds of deer and roe deer but I saw none of them all the way.’

Origin

Old English rā(ha), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch ree and German Reh.

Pronunciation

roe

/roʊ//rō/

Main definitions of roe in English

: roe1roe2ROE3

ROE3

  • Rules of engagement (in combat)