Definition of robber in US English:

robber

noun

  • A person who commits robbery.

    • ‘Narrated in a high piping voice, the story concerns a police chief who pursues a robber into a church.’
    • ‘He plays a computer security expert forced to hack into his own firewalls in order to save his family from bank robbers.’
    • ‘In one version the bandits and their boss join the imperial forces and from then on fight robbers and bandits in the name of law and order.’
    • ‘He tries to tell Rose that he's been exonerated because the real robber has been apprehended.’
    • ‘See how easily he slips out from the shadows to capture those bank robbers.’
    • ‘A cafe owner vouches for them and they are freed, but it isn't long before they come face to face with the bloodthirsty robber and his hatchet man!’
    • ‘Even the structure of the movie is rare - it belongs as much to the cops as it does to the robbers.’
    • ‘Fred and Barney start a private detective agency, but they are hired for their first job by a pair of bank robbers looking for someone to frame.’
    • ‘In order to protect the town from the robbers, soldiers keep watch in front of the gate.’
    • ‘In the movie, a group of bank robbers uses sophisticated technology to perform their heists.’
    • ‘The two call for backup, make their way inside, split up to cover more territory, and soon find the robbers.’
    • ‘Four young train enthusiasts hope to clean her up for a new private line but haven't reckoned on the plans of two train robbers.’
    • ‘After a brief struggle, Tom gets the gun away from one of the robbers and uses it to dispatch both intruders.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the boys find out that the money was stolen as part of a robbery, and one of the robbers wants it back.’
    • ‘The three robbers surprised guards last December when they burst into the museum five minutes before closing time, one wielding a machine gun.’
    • ‘Events get off to a ghoulish start as a pair of grave robbers rendezvous in a dark alley to transfer a freshly stolen body from one car to the other.’
    • ‘Hence, the brothers must outwit the robbers who want their money back, while facing the inevitable changes that will shape the rest of their lives.’
    • ‘The cop plays cat-and-mouse with the robbers, knocking them off one by one, all the while carrying on a verbal sparring match with the ringleader via walkie-talkie.’
    • ‘The robbers do not expect to find the new owners already moved in, but are not about to abort their mission.’
    • ‘This is a remake of a 1977 film starring Jane Fonda and George Segal as suburban bank robbers.’
    burglar, thief, housebreaker, cat burglar, sneak thief, mugger, shoplifter, stealer, pilferer
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French and Old French robere, from the verb rober (see rob).

Pronunciation

robber

/ˈräbər//ˈrɑbər/