Definition of road in English:



  • 1A wide way leading from one place to another, especially one with a specially prepared surface that vehicles can use.

    • ‘Training horses to accept traffic, road works and roadside obstacles is more important than ever in these days of litigation and the increasing number of vehicles on the roads.’
    • ‘Consequently, in the absence of a good public transport system, the vehicles on Delhi's roads have swollen to around 2.7 million.’
    • ‘On Monday, we headed north to Montana along some narrow, winding two-lane mountain roads.’
    • ‘His crisp white Greek Revival house still stands at a curve in the main road, momentarily blocking the bay view as you drive past.’
    • ‘The next day thousands of workers defied armed police and blockaded a major toll road into the provincial capital.’
    • ‘A near-fatal road accident in 1925 dramatically altered the course of her life.’
    • ‘The prison officers chased him, but he crossed a very busy main road and they lost him.’
    • ‘Watch out for surface drainage when new roads or driveways are constructed in the area.’
    • ‘Air pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, often found in buildings near major roads, restrict the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood.’
    • ‘New roads were constructed as wide boulevards to prevent fires from spreading from one side of the street to the other.’
    • ‘In the film, Gary and Jack meet more or less by accident when they steal a car and head off on the back roads through outback New South Wales towards Sydney.’
    • ‘Make sure fences, walls and gates are in good repair, so children cannot slip through holes onto busy roads.’
    • ‘For example a neutrally grey road surface illuminated by sunlight falling through green foliage may be violet; but its local colour remains grey.’
    • ‘These channels sometimes undercut farm roads and fields, causing them to collapse.’
    • ‘If a road accident involves a rider who has dismounted and is leading their horse at the time, the rider would be classified as a pedestrian.’
    • ‘Follow this road 1 1/2 miles northwest out of town to the Larson farm on the west side.’
    • ‘The curving lines of the roads give them the look of village lanes, and the few cars that venture into the cul-de-sacs usually travel slowly.’
    • ‘Janet would walk across the road every morning and glean what knowledge she could from the two brothers while they were milking.’
    • ‘He likes to restage legendary road accidents, such as the ones that killed James Dean, Grace Kelly and Jane Mansfield.’
    • ‘We travelled nine hours from Mexico City, and the bus let us off on the main road in the foothills, eight kilometres from town at midnight.’
    highway, thoroughfare, roadway
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    1. 1.1The part of a road intended for vehicles, especially in contrast to a shoulder or sidewalk.
      • ‘Two more black cars were parked, blocking the road in front of Zoe.’
      • ‘Two projectors set up in front of a crumbling assemblage of wood shacks beamed dual images of the gangs onto a ten-story housing project as the inhabitants of the barrio formed a crowd in the middle of the road.’
    2. 1.2historical [with modifier]A regular trade route for a particular commodity.
      ‘the Silk Road across Asia to the West’
    3. 1.3Mining An underground passage or gallery in a mine.
    4. 1.4North American A railroad.
    5. 1.5British A railroad track, especially as clear (or otherwise) for a train to proceed.
      ‘they waited for a clear road at Hellifield Junction’
  • 2A series of events or a course of action that will lead to a particular outcome.

    ‘he's well on the road to recovery’
    • ‘A gang of petty thieves make a big score on an armored van, but instead of landing on easy street, they find themselves on the road to frustration.’
    • ‘Understanding this can aid teachers and learners as they make sense of interpersonal conflict on the road to forming successful groups.’
    • ‘Doubling their latest annual dividend suggests they're well on the road to recovery.’
    • ‘He has created a lavishly stunning, sweeping story of the little wooden doll's many adventures on the road to boyhood.’
    • ‘Even though her storyline - which follows João on the road to stardom, with several stopovers in prison - can seem underdeveloped, Ramos is always charismatic.’
    • ‘Our story concerns the continuing growth and development of Anakin Skywalker on the road to becoming the greatest screen villain of all time.’
    • ‘In many ways, we were on the road to perdition with agencies and advertisers.’
    • ‘The project has provided new knowledge and skills for many producers, setting them on the road to achieving this.’
    • ‘Anointing the house cricket Timothy as Pinocchio's conscience guide, the two set off on a series of wild and wacky adventures, each providing a valuable lesson on the road to becoming a real boy.’
    • ‘Eiriz's works resist the world and maintain a critical space apart from the propaganda of the world in a way profoundly akin to Adorno's formulation; they stand as powerful and moving signposts on the road to Dystopia.’
    • ‘It's about how these children, many of whom lack self-confidence and are on the road toward delinquency, overcome challenges through this class.’
    • ‘He said figuring out what caused the Columbia to break up could help pave the road to recovery.’
    • ‘Clearly, fascism could serve as a way station on the road to other forms of anticapitalism.’
    1. 2.1A particular course or direction taken or followed.
      ‘the low road of apathy and alienation’
      • ‘Authors of burlesque usually avoided the high ethical road of the satirist, who ridicules a folly or fashion in the hope of eradicating it.’
      • ‘The bottom line to this week's two-step is that Zoellick and Lamy have a long road to walk before they get back to Doha.’
      • ‘He is the great model of the free artist who follows his own, unimproved road.’
      • ‘The path of voluptas led to earthly pleasure, while the road of virtue, which Hercules preferred, gave him ‘a place in the council of gods.’’
      way, path, route, direction, course
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  • 3

    ‘Boston Roads’
    (often in place names) another term for roadstead
    anchorage, harbour, port, mooring, roads
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  • by road

    • In or on a road vehicle.

      • ‘It is designed to be shipped, and is easily transported by road and rail.’
      • ‘‘Getting the right type of green oak in the United Kingdom meant bringing it long distances by road,’ he says.’
      • ‘As he must want to go home, he can go by road, rail or water.’
      • ‘Thought these systems are shipped out of Limerick by road, using up to a hundred trucks that pull right up to the facility loading bays.’
      • ‘Doctors could no longer reach Lost Valley by road and Jerry and Sarah could not afford to fly them in.’
      • ‘Approaching the fine port cities by sea shows them in a much more favourable light than arriving by road or airport.’
      • ‘This is covered in corrugated metal, and was prefabricated in Thessalonica, brought in by road and installed by crane - the only major part of the building not made locally.’
      • ‘Lying just inside the official boundary line between the two countries, Gretna was about 350 miles by road from London.’
      • ‘We travelled around the country mainly by road.’
      • ‘Ten sea-miles from the town, and some thirty kilometres by road, it offers all the charms of seclusion.’
  • down the road

    • informal In the future.

      • ‘Do you want a well-designed house that fits your lifestyle today and years down the road?’
      • ‘A customer may not be ready to buy during the tour, but they remember the experience, keep business cards and call the artists or stop by one of the galleries a few months down the road.’
      • ‘Ultimately, you'll need to establish that this greater worth translates into a higher sales price down the road.’
      • ‘While action here may not help our industry next year, it may have a real impact down the road, she said.’
      • ‘‘I was worried about the implications but still thought they were five to ten years down the road,’ recalls Chapela.’
      • ‘However, most respondents indicated they will feel more comfortable setting up a business five or ten years down the road.’
      • ‘I think, down the road, they appreciate and remember that you took the time to tell them, he said.’
      • ‘I think you'll see a 3-liter eventually, down the road.’
      • ‘I had to ask myself, ‘Should I really get this when I know it will air on TV, and also be part of a season set down the road?’’
      • ‘‘The customer is more comfortable spending money if they know it will look the same down the road as when I hand it to them,’ she said.’
      • ‘Down the road, the networking capability will lead to Internet applications, Yamaha says.’
  • the end of the road

  • hit the road

  • in the (or one's) road

    • informal In someone's way.

      • ‘‘That's good,’ he said, ‘because it means you have been out of his road all night.’’
      • ‘The question here is: ‘Should this country be led by someone who is prepared to go out and besmirch the reputations of anybody who gets in their road?’’
      • ‘People in their right minds kept well out of his road.’
      • ‘At feeding time, the dominant mare will walk up to the feed trough and pin her ears back, immediately all the other horses move out of her road.’
      • ‘If he's here too long he gets in my road, Cathy confirms.’
      • ‘When Williams came around the screen and looked for room to drive, Baxter was directly in his road, cutting off access to the lane.’
  • one for the road

    • informal A final drink, especially an alcoholic one, before leaving for home.

      • ‘I had one for the road and left Key West without any hard feelings.’
      • ‘Ah then you'll be wanting one for the road then.’
      • ‘Of course, there is no harm in having one for the road too!’
      • ‘I really should be going, but a tiny little one for the road sounds simply divine.’
      • ‘‘Too many individuals who know they should not drive can still be cajoled by friends or family to have one for the road,’ he said.’
      • ‘He'd had a few, one or two, and one for the road, and decided to go into jealousy mode.’
      • ‘Nothing can bring him back, but we hope that his death will make all of us realise the consequences of having one for the road’
      • ‘You've got a thirty - mile drive home on icy roads and your friends are encouraging you to have another drink - one for the road.’
  • on the road

    • 1On a long journey or series of journeys, especially as part of one's job as a sales representative or a performer.

      • ‘In the end, Forney takes his show on the road, performing live with his son at a heartland music festival to a bewildered audience of twelve.’
      • ‘His daughter-in-law, Janet, is one of eight sales representatives who are on the road daily.’
      • ‘Despite a perfect marriage to the perfect lady, he spent his time on the road as a travelling salesman, making friends and accepting every opportunity presented to him.’
      • ‘Now the group send it on the road once more, touring to Australia, Hong Kong, New York, Paris, Zurich and San Francisco.’
      • ‘Because of the popularity of their comedy show, they took the show on the road for a tour lasting six years.’
      • ‘What keeps you on the road are the performances.’
      • ‘I've been on the road recently, traveling mostly by car to visit some customers here in the New York area.’
      • ‘He brought to his performances the residual skills developed from years on the road, performing in front of live audiences.’
      • ‘Shortly afterwards, the group does break with Towle, who's talking about accompanying them on the road.’
      • ‘Accompanying them on the road are a cavalcade of young, willing, and available groupies, including the radiant, enigmatic Penny Lane.’
      on tour, touring, travelling, doing the rounds, on the circuit
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      1. 1.1(of a person) without a permanent home and moving from place to place.
        • ‘He had moved out of the house he shared with his wife, Sharon, and was on the road with a teenage junkie named Dawn.’
    • 2(of a car) in use; able to be driven.

      1. 2.1(of or with reference to the price of a motor vehicle) including the cost of license plates, tax, etc., so the vehicle is fully ready for use on public roads.
        ‘we found on-the-road prices from 5,780 to 6,151 dollars’
  • out of the (or one's) road

    • informal Out of someone's way.

  • a road to nowhere

    • A situation or course of action offering no prospects of progress or advancement.

      • ‘I considered traveling again but I was worried that it was literally a road to nowhere.’
      • ‘Only time will judge whether the team is on a road to nowhere.’
      • ‘When it comes to the quality of our democracy we are traveling on a road to nowhere.’
      • ‘Once headed down a road to nowhere, Eddie George has turned into one of the true titans of the league’
      • ‘Sandy Moffat (Seven Days, November 26) posed the question: is art on a road to nowhere?’
      • ‘Short-term advantage for factory or farmer is a road to nowhere.’
      • ‘Trouble is, such arrogance can lead just as quickly to a player heading off down a road to nowhere.’
      • ‘Having been part of a few meandering relationships in recent years, that have ultimately been a trip on a road to nowhere, I'm not counting on anything just yet.’
      • ‘But they have been so busy becoming politicians they know nothing about anything and are leading us on a road to nowhere.’
      • ‘I think Chris is on a road to nowhere with this one, partly because how you view Chomsky's assertion depends to a great extent on which evidence you accept and how much weight you attach to it, but mainly because I think he's wrong.’
  • take to the road (or take the road)

    • Set out on a journey or series of journeys.

      • ‘On the heels of his last album ‘Gone In The Head’, Wally and his band are taking to the road again with a new show.’
      • ‘A celebration of life on the islands off Kerry's coast is now taking to the road.’
      • ‘Even better, the producers became willing participants in Browne's most ambitious projects when the programme took to the road.’
      • ‘The story follows the adventures of a desk cop who, when his ex-wife is viciously murdered and his beloved daughter kidnapped, takes to the road after the perpetrators.’
      • ‘The play was part of the Dublin Fringe Festival, and now takes to the road for a nationwide tour which includes two performances in Sligo on April 23 and 24 at the Hawk's Well Theatre.’
      • ‘About two dozen artists are taking to the road in key electoral battleground states in hopes that their music can sway undecided voters to join their cause.’
      • ‘The energetic troupe of performers from the Open Door Drama Group in Laois will once again be taking to the road.’
      • ‘The imro Showcase Tour, Ireland's longest running national music showcase tour, takes to the road again in March.’
      • ‘It was with a refreshed sense of purpose that they took to the road again.’
      • ‘She took to the road with the candidate, and threw herself into every aspect of the campaign, down to the candidate's wardrobe and hair.’


Old English rād journey on horseback foray; of Germanic origin; related to the verb ride.