Definition of rigorous in English:

rigorous

adjective

  • 1Extremely thorough, exhaustive, or accurate.

    ‘the rigorous testing of consumer products’
    • ‘In September, they'll compete in a more rigorous series of tests before receiving the go ahead to race from California through Nevada within 10 hours.’
    • ‘The decision to merge was the result of serious discussion and rigorous strategic analysis during the past three months by the board of directors and the management team.’
    • ‘He has not provided any rigorous analysis or even detailed explanation of these alleged technical problems.’
    • ‘His is among the most rigorous analyses we've seen of the subject.’
    • ‘Analysis of results was extremely rigorous, and the dissertation was also noteworthy for its clarity of presentation, with complex results presented in a logical and understandable manner.’
    • ‘He rightly noted that the importance of ensuring the integrity of the voting system dictates that the machines and their operating software should be subject to the most rigorous and comprehensive testing regime.’
    • ‘The agency is committed to rigorous safety testing before a variety or technology is released to the public.’
    • ‘The importance of this book lies in its clear-sighted examination of women's subject citizenship, and its strength, in its sustained and rigorous analysis of the state's record on it.’
    • ‘The author's rigorous and abundant analyses of various types of art historical texts demonstrate how entrenched the idea of progress is in the field.’
    • ‘What you need is a rigorous analysis of where the money is really needed in terms of the front-line services,’ she said.’
    • ‘A more rigorous analysis could lead one to conclude that labor costs played a role.’
    • ‘May now admits that the selection process should have been more rigorous: Participation dropped off after the business concept was chosen, indicating that many didn't like the idea.’
    • ‘Instead, we undertook a rigorous financial analysis, putting the value of global brands into the quantitative context that managers have long used to evaluate assets like machinery and inventories.’
    • ‘Her approach to film is not unlike that of photography: careful composition, rigorous planning of the frame, scrupulous attention to visual detail and regular use of a stationary camera.’
    • ‘They also have more rigorous and frequent solvency tests on customers, and consistently charge interest on late payments and reminders.’
    • ‘But, by paying rigorous attention to the real dynamics of human relationships, Marber shows that it is possible to get a whole lot closer.’
    • ‘Those who are principally interested in large-scale, rigorous quantitative analysis will also find only one or two of the chapters in the book interesting.’
    • ‘Corn produced this summer could undergo the same rigorous testing we are currently seeing for this genetically engineered trait.’
    • ‘Just as important as rigorous analysis when restructuring a company is a compelling vision of the future, she said.’
    • ‘It was critical to be rigorous and thorough in that process.’
    meticulous, punctilious, conscientious, careful, diligent, attentive, ultra-careful, scrupulous, painstaking, exact, precise, accurate, correct, thorough, studious, exhaustive, mathematical, detailed, perfectionist, methodical, particular, religious, strict
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of a rule, system, etc.) strictly applied or adhered to.
      ‘rigorous controls on mergers’
      • ‘Any bottle of champagne has to follow a very rigorous set of rules to qualify for the ‘champagne’ label.’
      • ‘Rather than adhering to the system of rigorous discipline that the assortment of troubled kids have become accustomed to, Mathieu instead prefers to try and understand their problems and inspire them through his love of music.’
      • ‘Such a culture, based on the most rigorous rules of court etiquette and procedure, naturally gave rise to correspondingly formalised aesthetic theories of music and the theatre.’
      • ‘As the international trade group for the interactive gambling industry, we have spent the past six years promoting rigorous government regulation of our industry.’
      • ‘Quality levels are in turn controlled by rigorous vetting and cataloguing, so buyers can feel confident they know just what they are getting for their money.’
      • ‘In 1998, he cited ‘vigilant and rigorous control’ over costs as a main goal.’
      • ‘Over the past year, 180 solutions has attempted to clean up its image and now enforces rigorous rules on its affiliates and has added safeguards into its software.’
      • ‘Our regulatory system is the most rigorous in the world.’
      • ‘If there was a rigorous enforcement of regulations these incidences would be curbed because managements would be penalised severely.’
      • ‘However, in the UK there are rigorous controls in place to maintain safety and standards in the stunt profession.’
      • ‘To their inferiors, each official demanded rigorous implementation of orders, while bargaining with and concealing resources from those above them.’
      • ‘While no one doubts the need for more rigorous border controls now, there are critics who say the federal government is doing a poor job of distinguishing between potential terrorists and legitimate travelers.’
    2. 1.2(of a person) adhering strictly or inflexibly to a belief, opinion, or way of doing something.
      ‘a rigorous teetotaler’
      • ‘People need to be specific, people need to be rigorous about project definitions and measurements.’
      • ‘When there's four of us, we are very rigorous in what we allow through.’
      • ‘The rigorous self-discipline of the Presbyterian work ethic, however, did not grip the Kane household.’
      • ‘He is rigorous in his methods: if a picture needs a caption to explain it, he believes it has failed.’
    3. 1.3Harsh and demanding.
      ‘my exercise regime is a little more rigorous than most’
      ‘the rigorous climate in the regions of perpetual snow high in the Himalayas’
      • ‘The challenge then became to be physically competent enough to cope with the rigorous demands of filming, and to cut a suitably believable action hero.’
      • ‘Everyone is put through the same rigorous training.’
      • ‘It was her job, and she did it with a professionalism that came from rigorous training and self-discipline.’
      • ‘University is difficult enough with rigorous course work, steep fees and social demands, but try to imagine attending while severely disabled.’
      • ‘The training is extremely rigorous and the performers are expected to grow and form a unit within the studio.’
      • ‘I was a senior this year and that meant even more rigorous courses, club meetings, and long sports practices.’
      • ‘They had known each other since their college days, completing the rigorous interior design courses for their majors.’
      • ‘It will be a rigorous course used to increase your endurance, speed, agility, and muscle mass.’
      • ‘After joining the Jesuit Order, he underwent rigorous training in Rome and Madrid and was named a missionary to the uncharted regions of New Spain.’
      • ‘It was rigorous but after a hard day's work, and knowing that I would know how to defend myself in a tough situation, it seemed all worth it.’
      • ‘Gagarin was subjected to extremely rigorous training - physical, mental, and psychological.’
      • ‘He was a large man, broad shoulders, muscular limbs with a well-toned body and large, powerful hands that came from his regular and rigorous combat practice with his friend.’
      • ‘She hadn't seen anyone from her school in a long time, as she had been taking courses through correspondence to adhere to her rigorous therapy schedule.’
      • ‘Tara had found that it was the kids who complained far less than their adult counterparts about the rigorous therapy they sometimes had to go through in order for their bodies to heal properly.’
      • ‘There, she took ballet six days a week and had a rigorous academic course load, plus music theory, singing, and body conditioning.’
      • ‘Charter schools, higher standards, rigorous demands on teachers, and smaller class size, he writes, are all diversions, aimed at keeping us from striking at the real heart of the problem.’
      • ‘He witnessed firsthand the rigorous but gratifying demands of entrepreneurship.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French rigorous or late Latin rigorosus, from rigor stiffness (see rigor).

Pronunciation:

rigorous

/ˈriɡ(ə)rəs/