Definition of right in English:

right

adjective

  • 1Morally good, justified, or acceptable.

    ‘I hope we're doing the right thing’
    with infinitive ‘you were quite right to criticize him’
    • ‘This scenario no doubt raises questions as to whether it is morally right for a teacher to date a pupil.’
    • ‘I am satisfied, however, that it would be right to allow this evidence to go before the jury.’
    • ‘Of course it is right that the legal profession should be accountable for its acts and defaults.’
    • ‘Readers may think I am wrong, but morally we must behave as though I was right.’
    • ‘You have to decide what you believe is right and recognise it is a very heavy responsibility.’
    • ‘What I'm saying is, is it actually right, is it morally the right reason to legalise the drug?’
    • ‘In a civilised society, it can't be right to allow vulnerable people to effectively starve to death.’
    • ‘When we follow our conscience, we weigh the arguments and do what we recognise to be right.’
    • ‘She said that by not accepting the money, she would be admitting they were right.’
    • ‘To say a certain type of behaviour has evolved is not to say it is morally right.’
    • ‘Conduct which is justified is right, or at least permissible, in the circumstances.’
    • ‘Crucially, I also said he had done the right thing in recognising his errors and deciding to resign.’
    • ‘The company is certainly right not to allow its business decisions to be dictated by a single ratings agency.’
    • ‘I believe a change would not only be right for the CIU, but also morally right.’
    • ‘If they can do it in a way that they feel is morally and ethically right, that's fine.’
    • ‘In all the circumstances, I do not think it would be right to allow Evans's conviction to stand.’
    • ‘Supporters emphasise the fact that they are truly in love and it is right that they can finally be together.’
    • ‘We demonise those that do not accept the system yet never question whether the system is right.’
    • ‘Rallies and legitimate demonstrations are right and proper ways of making their feelings known.’
    • ‘It is enough to say that we have always contended that it is right and proper that that decision is in the hands of the judges.’
    just, fair, equitable, good, upright, righteous, virtuous, proper, moral, morally justified, ethical, honourable, honest, principled
    View synonyms
  • 2True or correct as a fact.

    ‘I'm not sure I know the right answer’
    ‘her theories were proved right’
    • ‘Inland Revenue has the expertise and can ask the right questions to get the right answers.’
    • ‘Did Hemingway know the right answer and not reveal it before taking his own life?’
    • ‘It's important to get the names of the various bits of our British islands and their inhabitants right.’
    • ‘Yes, yes, everything you say is right and true, but something about it just didn't quite cut it.’
    • ‘Perhaps the answer is that both answers are right, but it all depends on which way you want to look at it.’
    • ‘Detailed answer feedback tells them what they got wrong, as well as highlighting the right answer.’
    • ‘He drew pictures instead of making calculations, and somehow got the right answers.’
    • ‘It would be much better for all of us if they just gave us the choice, and the right facts.’
    • ‘Why would they wish to be seen as soft on drugs if they did not think their opinions were right?’
    • ‘While it is right that York is not preserved in formaldehyde, the sheer scale of development is troubling.’
    • ‘We do not allow people a second try on a second question when they have so absurdly got it right the first time round.’
    • ‘For certain kinds of mathematical problem, computers have no short cuts to the right answer.’
    • ‘To have a shot at winning the prizes all you have to do is give us the right answer to this question.’
    • ‘My short answer to that question is that there is no clearly right answer to it.’
    • ‘Try a pop and movies quiz, with a prize for the child or group who gets the most answers right.’
    • ‘Those who had written the right answers were thrilled when each result was announced.’
    • ‘Public opinion is not always right, and it is frequently mistaken about military action.’
    • ‘Another reason I try to get my facts right is that putting ideas on paper gives them weight.’
    • ‘The Speaker is not a quizmaster who decides whether the right answer has been given to a question.’
    • ‘In my opinion, however, that is not the right conclusion to be reached from those authorities.’
    correct, accurate, without error, unerring, exact, precise
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1predicative Correct in one's opinion or judgment.
      ‘she was right about Tom having no money’
      • ‘North Yorkshire police are right to re-emphasise today that this is one of the safest places to live.’
      • ‘He is absolutely right in saying that local children would benefit as the nearest play park is at least half a mile away.’
      • ‘If we prove right in our judgments, that would bear out in how events transpire.’
      • ‘Not so, the masses are right to have their opinions and favourites - but that does not validate them.’
      • ‘I was sexually abused as a child by a relative and Mr Hearld is absolutely right, the effect never leaves you.’
      • ‘If the US is right, the doctrine is now established as part of the law of nations.’
      • ‘The effect on his colleagues would have been only mildly eased by the fact that Laplace was right!’
      • ‘Socialist Review was right to say last month that confidence is beginning to return to the rank and file.’
      • ‘Where she was not right was in justifying the higher rate poundage on lower rateable values in Scotland.’
      • ‘Mr Houseman is absolutely right to claim that the rateable system is unfair.’
      • ‘If the government is right it has no reason to fear removing ministers entirely from the judgment process.’
      • ‘North and East Yorkshire councils are right to exercise caution in reopening rights of way.’
      • ‘In this respect, the Sangh Parivar is quite right in saying that facts do not matter.’
      • ‘Manet thought his wife didn't fit into the picture; as a matter of fact he was probably right.’
      • ‘Again the government admitted, before the election, that its critics were right.’
      • ‘However strongly a person may feel that he or she is right, human memory is notoriously fallible.’
      • ‘Two years there from now too, the German historians will accept that we're right.’
      • ‘With the exception of Jonny Wilkinson's superb try in the third Test, he is absolutely right.’
      • ‘I narrowed my eyes at him but let out a sigh and resigned myself to the fact that he was right.’
      • ‘In my opinion, the Judge was right in the decision which he reached on the Second Issue.’
      correct, accurate, without error, unerring, exact, precise
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 According to what is correct for a particular situation or thing.
      ‘is this the right way to the cottage?’
      ‘you're not holding it the right way up’
      • ‘He sounds just the right height to run the risk of encountering an accidental sharp elbow jab to the bridge of his nose.’
      • ‘It involves distorting an image so that it is unrecognisable unless viewed in the right way.’
      • ‘Just outside the forming neutron star conditions are right for this kind of nuclear alchemy.’
      • ‘I realised that despite my best moral efforts I had not been able to sound the right chord.’
      • ‘Part of being a truly smart person is to know which level is the right one at a given time.’
      • ‘He turned 29 three days ago and could probably do a job for England in the right conditions.’
      • ‘On the surface it seems like the consultant had the right perspective of the situation.’
      • ‘She nodded back at me and turned so we were both facing in the right direction, towards which we began to walk.’
      • ‘There is a fear that they made the right noises to calm the situation down and now it has all gone quiet.’
      • ‘Well, that's simply not the right way to think about the situation, according to Microsoft.’
      • ‘Yesterday the various execs will all have sounded the right notes as they handled the various launches.’
      • ‘He knew exactly what everyone had to do, who had to run where to make the right pass for that situation.’
      • ‘It's easy to listen to, but difficult to perform with the right balance, sound and atmosphere.’
      • ‘He argues that the two officers who had failed to make a match did so because they were not given the right conditions to do so.’
      • ‘In the right conditions this is an incredible dive, but most of us found it terrifying on this occasion.’
      • ‘The timing is right and the climatic conditions just perfect to try out some of the ideas we have.’
      • ‘His current slump in form, a rare happening again, has to be viewed in the right perspective.’
      • ‘If our attitude is right and everything goes according to plan, we could cause an upset.’
      • ‘He said people mistakenly believed that adding salt to water would create the right conditions.’
      • ‘Tourism in York was now at about the right level according to the chairman of the English Tourism Board.’
    3. 2.3 The best or most suitable of a number of possible choices for a particular purpose or occasion.
      ‘he was clearly the right man for the job’
      ‘I was waiting for the right moment to ask him’
      • ‘Making the right decisions will allow the team to perform at its best.’
      • ‘Deciding the property was right for them, they put in an offer on the spot.’
      • ‘Most right-minded people accept that there's a right time and place for a firework display.’
      • ‘He was an outstanding communicator who offered the right briefing at the right moment.’
      • ‘This goes beyond a matter of different opinions about who is right for the job.’
      • ‘She was very calm, knew what she was doing and brought it to the attention of the right authorities.’
      • ‘Bening plays the spirited Sue Barlow, a spinster who has waited to meet the right man.’
      • ‘Something doesn't seem quite right at the very start of this disaster.’
      • ‘If you have the right elements at the right time, maybe it's true, anything can happen.’
      • ‘The style Maudslay employed is deliberately a little archaic, and in my judgement exactly right.’
      • ‘The widow, who was 56 at the time, had been on plenty of dates but she still hadn't met the right man.’
      • ‘Colin said that he would be keen to talk to anyone who thinks that they have the right kind of property in the area.’
      • ‘Only by getting to know oneself can one make the right choices at crucial moments, Lee said.’
      • ‘Did they hold up in the face of criticism with the right combination of vulnerability and bravery?’
      • ‘We would have to look at the prison rules and it would require a lot of work to achieve acceptance of people that this is the right way to go.’
      • ‘I suspect the firefighters would accept such a deal if it were presented in the right way.’
      • ‘The right exercises with the correct volumes and intensities will give you what you seek!’
      • ‘For me, he was the right man at the right moment, and it doesn't surprise me that he is heading their next World Cup bid.’
      • ‘Sometimes it can be genuinely disabling without the right treatment, if a nerve is trapped or a disc is bulging.’
      • ‘But honesty didn't seem right at the moment.’
      suitable, appropriate, acceptable, fitting, fit, correct, proper, desirable, preferable, ideal
      opportune, advantageous, favourable, auspicious, propitious, promising, heaven-sent, golden, good, lucky, happy, fortunate, benign, providential, felicitous, timely, well timed, ripe, convenient, expedient, suitable, appropriate, apt, fitting
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4 Socially fashionable or important.
      ‘he was seen at all the right places’
      • ‘It will be a great way to meet the right people and to get my foot in the door.’
  • 3predicative In a satisfactory, sound, or normal state or condition.

    ‘that sausage doesn't smell right’
    ‘if only I could have helped put matters right’
    • ‘We don't have Zire or Tungsten packaging to hand, but those figures sound about right.’
    • ‘We'd heard separately that the chip is due mid-March, so that sounds about right.’
    • ‘Tired of conflict, the negotiators swiftly agreed that two conferences a year sounded about right.’
    • ‘So we just chose a place where we wanted it to end, and then tried to fade it out from a minute before and it didn't sound right.’
    • ‘If weather conditions are right and the homemade snow settles, a snowball fight could be on the cards.’
    • ‘We've still got four games to put it right and, in my opinion, we need four points to secure a play-off place.’
    • ‘As for the dub, it just sounded odd after seeing the original, the wolves didn't sound right for a start.’
    • ‘In fact, some of the noises the new creatures make don't quite sound right at all.’
    • ‘Mr Allen said all the conditions were right for the AMRC in South Yorkshire to become a world leader.’
    • ‘Some of those people want the service to be right and others want the financial side to be right.’
    • ‘He had a feeling that something wasn't quite right with the situation, but decided to let it slide.’
    • ‘This particular plane just didn't sound right, like a car with something wrong with the radiator.’
    • ‘He looks right and sounds good - jovial on the surface with menace always lurking beneath.’
    • ‘It sounded about right but I'd never really thought of him in that way before.’
    • ‘Actually, look at it the other way: how easy is it, once your mind isn't right, for the body to give up?’
    • ‘There was something that he didn't think was quite right with Matt and Dom's relationship.’
    • ‘If conditions aren't right, our vole populations will never get back to former levels.’
    • ‘The Bolshoi Ballet is dancing, and everything seems absolutely right with the world.’
    • ‘As the name suggests, this is a spectacular spring plant that will grow into a large clump if the conditions are right.’
    • ‘I just didn't feel right from the start of the race.’
    healthy, in good health, fine, hale, in good shape, in trim, in good trim, well, fit, fighting fit, normal, sound, up to par
    View synonyms
  • 4On, toward, or relating to the side of a human body or of a thing that is to the east when the person or thing is facing north.

    ‘my right elbow’
    ‘the right edge of the field’
    ‘her right shoe’
    • ‘After having them only a few weeks he noticed the pattern fading on the right shoe.’
    • ‘Lift your right shoulder off the mat and touch your left knee with your right elbow.’
    • ‘Pat began to have pains in her right hip and side and mild stomach upsets in January last year.’
    • ‘As to the ribs, Dr Williams found that Harry had suffered a fracture of the second right rib at the side under the armpit.’
    • ‘In doing this, I levered a rock quickly out from the top section and watched it plummet towards my right foot.’
    • ‘Leave your hand on the wall and turn your body so the right hip and shoulder face the wall.’
    • ‘He flung the cigarette to the ground and squashed it slowly with the toe of his right shoe.’
    • ‘The first outwardly visible sign of change is in the body's right foot which has begun to spasm and move at the ankle.’
    • ‘A deformity in his right elbow has meant that he was up against great odds from the very beginning.’
    • ‘He had a swollen right orbit, a laceration over the right elbow, and bloody discharge from both nostrils.’
    • ‘It does mean, however, that a fast front crawl is as important as a strong right arm.’
    • ‘He would grow increasingly frustrated and lose his temper because he could not use his right arm properly or hold a pen.’
    • ‘She extended her right arm towards the dragon, her hand shaking slightly with fear.’
    • ‘She stood up, and balanced the basket on her hip though a stab of pain flashed up her body from her right leg.’
    • ‘One year before admission his right kidney had been removed because of renal cancer.’
    • ‘The woman grasps his ankles and the man places his left hand over her hip and props his body up with his right arm.’
    • ‘It was true; Beth's right foot was clad only in a pink sock with a hole in the toe.’
    • ‘The youth was driven by ambulance to Lewisham Hospital with six puncture wounds around the right elbow.’
    • ‘He said forensic experts concentrated on the right shoe, which had four hairs.’
    • ‘Use the same technique as above but add a twist, lifting your right shoulder towards the opposite knee.’
    right-hand, dextral, at three o'clock
    View synonyms
  • 5British informal attributive Complete; absolute (used for emphasis, typically in derogatory contexts)

    ‘I felt a right idiot’
    • ‘I'm having to eat it it with my hands now and I'm making a right mess of my keyboard, oh yes.’
    • ‘On top of nicking my biscuits they had also made a right mess when they made the tea.’
    • ‘The only aggressive magick I've done was directed towards a right cow in the last place I worked.’
    • ‘Looking back I suppose it was quite comical, we must have looked like a right old married couple.’
    • ‘At school Gareth looked a right mess.’
    • ‘Laois is in a right mess and it will take a lot more than Paudi Butler to sort it out.’
    absolute, complete, total, real, out-and-out, thorough, thoroughgoing, downright, perfect, utter, sheer, consummate, unmitigated, unqualified, veritable, in every respect, unalloyed
    View synonyms
  • 6Relating to a person or political party or grouping favoring conservative views.

    ‘are you politically right, left, or center?’
    • ‘How this fits in with far right Conservatives' rampant xenophobia is beyond me.’
    • ‘He uses his magazine the Weekly Standard to promote his hard right views.’
    • ‘Certainly Margaret Thatcher did not make many efforts to hide her extreme right views on immigration.’

adverb

  • 1To the furthest or most complete extent or degree (used for emphasis)

    ‘the car spun right off the track’
    ‘I'm right out of ideas’
    • ‘It is close to home and right next door to the playgroup he now attends.’
    • ‘The nightclub Broadway is also right next door, so you will not have far to stagger after an evening out on the town.’
    • ‘We walked down Downing Street right up to Number 10 and visited the Tower of London.’
    • ‘If, unlike me, you have fond childhood memories of Thunderbirds, this is probably right up your alley.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, he was engaged in a continual debate with Trotskyist ideas right up until his death.’
    • ‘Why do some people insist on parking their cars right up on the path so people can't get past?’
    • ‘Here he is, right there, you can see the nine of clubs right next to the nine of hearts.’
    • ‘A glebe is a piece of land forming part of a clergyman's living, and right next door was the tiny church of St Edmund.’
    • ‘So later this month a massive demonstration of farmers right across Europe will begin.’
    • ‘You used to be able to drive in in your car and pull right up to the plane and get on the plane.’
    • ‘Children and parents right throughout the country feel not enough is being done.’
    • ‘When we were boys a lot of it was a slum - they cleared quite a few streets right in the middle.’
    • ‘So it involves making it easier for parents to get their cars right to the school door at the expense of those of us who choose to walk.’
    • ‘At the beginning of the second year of the Billabong Odyssey, it was huge all the way from Jaws right round to Spain.’
    • ‘I opened my curtains this morning and saw loads of police right next door.’
    • ‘Their main worry was the plan to move the public car park for the meadows right next to their homes.’
    • ‘I put on my winter coat and walked out the front door right into the middle of the street.’
    • ‘Nissan has given it a longer wheelbase than the old car, and pushed the wheels right out to the corners.’
    • ‘They make a date to meet at the café the next day but when Henry shows up, Lucy just walks right by him.’
    • ‘Has the intrusion to the privacy of those living right next to the site been fully considered?’
    completely, fully, entirely, totally, wholly, absolutely, altogether, utterly, thoroughly, quite
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Exactly; directly (used to emphasize the precise location or time of something)
      ‘Harriet was standing right behind her’
      • ‘Turning on her heal she ran back the way they had come, Elliot right behind her.’
      • ‘They're all so smart, but I was sitting right under their nose fooling them.’
      • ‘There is no anger here but perhaps that is a more accurate reflection of life in Britain right now.’
      • ‘My best friend was really standing here right in front of me.’
      • ‘Sora nodded, and grabbed her keys and she headed out the door with Vash right behind her.’
      • ‘In England right now, he has fallen well behind the man of the moment, the Scotsman David Moyes.’
      • ‘The bars are to be fixed in two directions right underneath the core of the cube, so they can take the full weight.’
      • ‘Josh moved back a little and then moved his head to the side so that he was right in front of my face.’
      • ‘She's standing here right in front of me.’
      • ‘Williams' vivid descriptions put you right in the middle of the action.’
      • ‘Hemp could be used in most of the pulp mills in the country as the situation stands right now.’
      • ‘I'm standing here right in front of you.’
      • ‘The funnel stands upright from the superstructure, with a pair of ventilators right behind it.’
      • ‘Things have never been better for farmers of all types in New Zealand right now.’
      • ‘Which puts us right in the middle of the second point.’
      • ‘I felt thirsty, yet the most important thing for me right now was to know where I was.’
      • ‘Mitchell nodded and hurried down the stairs with his friends right behind him.’
      • ‘I stood up, thanked the officers, and stumbled back to my room with Max right behind me.’
      • ‘But it's not always right under our noses.’
      • ‘One of the biggest concerns in Italy right now is the extent of spiralling wage bills.’
      exactly, precisely, directly, immediately, just, squarely, square, dead
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2informal Immediately; without delaying or hesitating.
      ‘I'll be right back’
      straight, immediately, instantly, at once, straight away, right away, now, right now, that minute, this minute, that very minute, this very minute, that instant, this instant, in a flash, like a flash, directly, on the spot, forthwith, without further ado, without more ado, promptly, quickly, without delay, then and there, there and then, here and now, a.s.a.p., as soon as possible, as quickly as possible, with all speed
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3dialect, archaic as submodifier Very.
      ‘it's right spooky in there!’
      • ‘She's the one who gives you all your ideas and inspiration, but she's a right bad-tempered cow.’
      • ‘If you're on a tight budget, yet up for a right laddish drive, a coupe could well be for you.’
      • ‘They had directed traffic to ensure all the whites got a right good view of the action.’
      remarkably, extraordinarily, exceptionally, very, extremely, really, outstandingly, strikingly, signally, eminently, especially, particularly, incredibly, awfully, terribly, decidedly, supremely, peculiarly, distinctly, conspicuously
      View synonyms
  • 2Correctly.

    ‘he had guessed right’
    • ‘Because even if the media was doing things right, do you really think it can change the way things are?’
    • ‘I had some action, caught a couple of nice fish, so I must have done something right!’
    • ‘Well, dirty or not, and doing it right or not, we in Ireland have well and truly woken up to sex.’
    • ‘She wouldn't let you do anything unless you did it absolutely right.’
    • ‘The ship's control party did every thing exactly right even though they were hurt as well.’
    • ‘If you guess right you will appear to be a genius, if you guess wrong you will look foolish.’
    • ‘"The horse has done everything absolutely right today, " said Henderson.’
    correctly, accurately, properly, exactly, precisely, aright, rightly, perfectly, unerringly, faultlessly, truly
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 In the required or necessary way; properly; satisfactorily.
      ‘nothing's going right for me this season’
      • ‘If you expect to do everything right all of the time, then you can't afford to have a sense of humour.’
      • ‘He tells me what he thinks: where the Conservatives are going right or wrong, what is good or silly.’
      • ‘Obviously, if everything goes right we've got time to paint the car and all.’
      justly, fairly, equitably, impartially, well, properly, morally, ethically, honourably, honestly, lawfully, legally
      well, for the better, for the best, favourably, happily, advantageously, to one's advantage, beneficially, profitably, providentially, luckily, opportunely, conveniently, to one's satisfaction
      View synonyms
  • 3On or to the right side.

    ‘turn right at Main Street’
    • ‘Walk up onto the bridge and turn right along the road back up into Settle.’
    • ‘At the car park entrance turn right along the road to return to the junction by the bridge over the river.’
    • ‘The marker posts lead under power lines to a hawthorn tree, where the path veers right, towards the ridge.’
    • ‘Walking through the hall, the eye is drawn left and right towards the side galleries.’
    • ‘At the far side bear right and park where the road has become blocked with gravel.’
    • ‘I was driving a car in London, turning right from a side road into a one way system.’
    • ‘You control shot direction by moving a joystick left or right in the direction you want to place it.’

noun

  • 1That which is morally correct, just, or honorable.

    ‘she doesn't understand the difference between right and wrong’
    ‘the rights and wrongs of the matter’
    • ‘I believe it is nonsensical, and that God gave us the brains to know right from wrong.’
    • ‘He was truly an idealist, a man for the underdog, with a passion for justice and right.’
    • ‘If we were all mature and we all knew right from wrong, you know, the perfect world, then fine.’
    • ‘How else can children learn to think for themselves and distinguish right from wrong?’
    • ‘There is a lifetime of joy and companionship to be had from owning a dog but he needs to learn right from wrong at an early stage.’
    • ‘They taught me the importance of discipline and the difference between right and wrong.’
    • ‘I would presume since they think they are well informed they would know right from wrong.’
    • ‘Not believing in God has nothing to do with not knowing the difference between right or wrong, good and evil.’
    • ‘Some times, we need to pretend to be angry just for them to know right from wrong.’
    • ‘The flying machine helped to set the world straight in terms of true and false, right and wrong.’
    • ‘Perhaps wrong is the new right, in new-New Labour, just as dissent is the new unity.’
    • ‘The point of punishment is to learn a lesson from it, to clearly see right from wrong.’
    • ‘The child feels a sense of right and wrong, believes right will win and wants to contribute to this.’
    • ‘Every child should be brought up to know right from wrong and to respect their peers and elders.’
    • ‘It is not for them to be concerned about the niceties of justice or right and wrong or guilt or innocence.’
    • ‘They have no respect, no sense of right or wrong, and no right to be even called human.’
    goodness, rightness, righteousness, virtue, virtuousness, integrity, rectitude, uprightness, principle, propriety, morality, truth, truthfulness, honesty, honour, honourableness, justice, justness, fairness, equity, equitableness, impartiality
    View synonyms
  • 2A moral or legal entitlement to have or obtain something or to act in a certain way.

    with infinitive ‘she had every right to be angry’
    ‘you're quite within your rights to ask for your money back’
    ‘there is no right of appeal against the decision’
    • ‘Her aim is to safeguard employee privacy rights in the face of growing employer snooping capabilities.’
    • ‘She said that the experiment denied basic animal rights, and that the rats deserve free water.’
    • ‘Gibraltar and the Falkland Islands have the right to self-determination enshrined in their constitutions.’
    • ‘The respondent proceeded to exercise her right of appeal against the review decision of 26 November 2001.’
    • ‘The government has launched a full-scale onslaught on public sector workers' pension rights.’
    • ‘And what of the Prime Minister's attitude to workers' rights at home?’
    • ‘The respondents in our sample do not agree with opposition to intellectual property rights advocated by the Open Source.’
    • ‘Some claim that city surveillance is a violation of one's right to privacy.’
    • ‘The educated have the right to vote, but they don't exercise it.’
    • ‘The rule had been interpreted in a way which hindered the prisoner's right of access to the court.’
    • ‘"Security and regulation must benefit the user and protect their fundamental right to privacy, " she said.’
    • ‘They have to learn to respect the right of other citizens to hold a contrary opinion.’
    • ‘Workers have been forced into seeking redress through exercising their individual legal rights rather than pursuing grievances through collective action.’
    • ‘And it's hard to see how a Canadian court would uphold the aforementioned human rights abuses.’
    • ‘Neither the government nor Labor had any popular mandate to violate fundamental democratic rights.’
    • ‘The right to privacy must be found to encompass the inner domain of thought.’
    • ‘Only if the basic fundamental rights are protected can a country succeed and prosper.’
    • ‘Representatives of education reform and workers' rights groups also attended.’
    • ‘But I don't have the right to vote in the next U.S. election.’
    • ‘Such conduct is part of every state's legitimate right of self-defense.’
    entitlement, prerogative, privilege, advantage, due, birthright, liberty, authority, authorization, power, licence, permission, dispensation, leave, consent, warrant, charter, franchise, sanction, exemption, immunity, indemnity
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1rights The authority to perform, publish, film, or televise a particular work, event, etc.
      ‘they sold the paperback rights’
      • ‘The word is that Sony's Screen Gems division paid $4 million to buy rights to the film.’
      • ‘Castlebar will be the only town in Ireland to stage this event and Channel Four have asked for exclusive rights to film the event.’
      • ‘He said he finally agreed to sell the film rights to Disney after a weekend of tense negotiations at his luxurious new house in Marrakech.’
      • ‘With the success of the novel, film rights were snapped up by producer Walter Mirisch.’
      • ‘Television rights to the Davis Cup have been signed again by BBC Sport, following successful coverage of Great Britain ties.’
      • ‘There's an effort underway by Universal to acquire the rights to the first film.’
      • ‘In 1985 the television rights came up for renegotiation and BBC and ITV offered £16m for four years.’
      • ‘The programme is also a co-production with the Discovery Channel, which takes North American television and home video rights.’
      • ‘Feature film rights to the novel have been kicked around Hollywood for some time, with Tom Cruise mooted to be involved.’
      • ‘The broadcasters have paid large sums of money for the rights to televise Wimbledon, so they have a right to expect some give from the organisers.’
      • ‘Theatre producer Oscar Lewenstein, however, offered Hall a London production provided that the film rights were unsold.’
      • ‘Marilyn Monroe had bought the film rights with a view to inviting Olivier to be her co-star and director.’
      • ‘And how important are factors like television rights and media coverage?’
      • ‘He urged Harry Cohn, head of Columbia, to buy the film rights for him.’
      • ‘MGM bought film rights for $250,000 the highest sum ever paid for a stage property until then.’
      • ‘Director John Ford was drawn to the story and purchased the film rights, but it would be many years before he could actually make the film.’
      • ‘For the past year most people were under the impression that legislation was in place to avoid the television rights to key sporting events being sold off.’
      • ‘Tara Bangla, a Calcutta-based television station bought broadcast rights, and has screened the film on prime time.’
      • ‘A sequel, Heart of Coal, has just been published and film rights have also been sold.’
      • ‘In the meantime, she will earn her keep through merchandising, corporate events, filming rights, open days, and escorted tours.’
  • 3the rightThe right-hand part, side, or direction.

    ‘take the first turning on the right’
    ‘she seated me on her right’
    • ‘Worse than that there is a right turn arrow painted on that one lane, for a side road going off to the right.’
    • ‘At the end of the loch, the track turns sharp left, in front of Lochan Dubh, before bearing round to the right.’
    • ‘There is a long symbolic tradition in Ethiopia of movement towards the right or to the east.’
    • ‘From the Durrow approach a new wall has been completed to the right in front of house at the cross roads.’
    • ‘Cross the road in front of it and join a main path from the right which leads to a wood through a kissing gate along the banks of Blea Tarn.’
    • ‘On the extreme left, a featureless female sits at a table; another loiters outside on the right.’
    • ‘The green drops away on the left hand side, there is a big bunker on the right and trees all around.’
    • ‘For example, one might be to the right and the other directly upwards, as shown in Figure 21.’
    • ‘The second shot requires to be hit over the cross bunkers avoiding the River West Water on the right.’
    • ‘The leaf on the left was collected in Antarctica, and those on the right from South Africa.’
    • ‘His new hair is reminiscent of a young Clark Gable, with a side parting slicked over to the right.’
    • ‘Clench your right fist and draw it back to your side, the back of your hand to the right.’
    • ‘In the picture above, the entrance door is to the right and a makeshift extension to the front houses the kitchen.’
    • ‘Then, all at once, the ship jerked to one side, causing the entire room to tilt to the right.’
    • ‘Hedgerows and fields make up the left hand side of the path with the old canal on the right.’
    • ‘There is a small bar area to the left as you walk inside and then the main dining room to the right.’
    • ‘There are three fixing points, two on the left hand side and one on the right.’
    • ‘It took me a while to start it because the ignition was on the left side instead of the right.’
    • ‘The picture was brought in by Bill Cordukes, who can be seen on the second row from the front on the right.’
    • ‘This can affect the ribs, which become prominent on one side, usually on the right.’
    1. 3.1 (in football or a similar sport) the right-hand half of the field when facing the opponent's goal.
      • ‘Five minutes later Corby doubled the score with a solo strike. He broke down the right from the halfway line.’
      • ‘Within a minute Scott Barley made a low diving header following a cross from the right for goal number four.’
      • ‘A diagonal run by David Ralph met a cross from the right at full pelt for the third goal before half time.’
      • ‘Forder stepped up to do the honours and hit a firm shot into the bottom right.’
      • ‘He edged them two more points ahead before Queens looked certain to score on the right.’
      • ‘Seven minutes later, a ball from midfield caught out Alcide and saw the pacy Gordon bear down on goal on the right.’
      • ‘He is a classic winger and, even if he occasionally plays on the left for Denmark, he is more comfortable on the right.’
      • ‘From the start the Badgers played some lovely hockey exploiting the space down the right.’
      • ‘Still the ball was re-cycled and whipped wide out to Kelley on the right.’
      • ‘The lead was short-lived, Ovenden, in their first attack of the half, broke free on the right.’
      • ‘Gavin Mahon may play down the right with either Nielsen or Stephen Glass down the left.’
      • ‘He needs ball winners of the quality of Keano to allow him to play down the right.’
      • ‘Alexandersson makes use of a lucky break in midfield to feed Larsson on the right.’
      • ‘Ben Furness was driving Silsden forwards and Hoyle held the ball up well before feeding Rhodes on the right.’
      • ‘Now Recoba picks it up deep, plays a beautiful pass in to Varela breaking down the right.’
      • ‘Mackay then cut in from the right and smashed a powerful drive off the underside of the crossbar.’
      • ‘Rebecca Cattle netted the opener after great play down the right by Lucy McNamara.’
      • ‘Dom Grimes and George Ross worked tirelessly in midfield and Sam Pollock worked hard on the right.’
      • ‘He found support from Hogg and although the move broke down, Taylor put Lee away down the right.’
      • ‘Near half-time Pool's Martin Roberts broke away and fed the ball out to the right.’
    2. 3.2rightBaseball
      ‘a looping single to right’
      short for right field
    3. 3.3 The right wing of an army.
    4. 3.4 A right turn.
      ‘he made a right in Dorchester Avenue’
      • ‘Somebody got ready to pit and Riggs obviously didn't know about it and slammed the brakes on and hung a right on me.’
      • ‘The next challenge is a high speed right, nerves of steel will be required for this one.’
    5. 3.5 A road or entrance on the right.
      ‘take the first right over the stream’
    6. 3.6 (especially in the context of boxing) a person's right fist.
    7. 3.7 A blow given with the right fist.
      ‘the young cop swung a terrific right’
      • ‘Instead he countered with two lefts to the body, a right to the head and a left to the jaw.’
  • 4treated as singular or plural A grouping or political party favoring conservative views and supporting capitalist economic principles.

    • ‘Propagandists and perpetrators were not only from the far Right, but also from the Left.’
    • ‘The parties of the Left and of the Right are in conflict because they both aim at supreme power.’
    • ‘For one thing, this is a whiskery, reflexive old incantation of the Right, that long ago lost any very vivid meaning.’
    • ‘What is difficult to understand is why so much deference is paid to the threats from the Right.’
    • ‘The brilliance of the Right was in wildly and irresponsibly staking outrageous positions.’
    • ‘Extremists from the Right can only breed if the mainstream do not have a voice from the traditional parties.’
    • ‘The Right has done a wonderful job of making themselves seem like the victim when they are the ones running the show.’
    • ‘It all depends on whether the smaller parties are on the Left or the Right.’
    • ‘The family crisis widely accepted on the Right as well as the Left is an optical illusion.’
    • ‘This attitude alone explains a lot about why the Right has gotten hold of the airwaves as effectively as it has.’
    • ‘So the stock market will perform better when the Left is in the wilderness and the Right is in the Oval Office.’
    • ‘On the other hand, the roots of the hysteria of the Right go far beyond nationalism and national security.’
    • ‘It's funny how bothered the Right gets about any large leftist demo, perhaps feeling a little threatened.’
    • ‘The years of independence have taught both the soft Left and the Right that there are no simple processes.’
    • ‘The Left can no longer afford to get wrapped up in the Right's way of framing issues.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, many on both the Right and the Left cannot seem to make that separation.’
    • ‘As an aside, I'm still trying to work out the logic of this shift to the Right.’
    • ‘One is never enough because the Left is going to distort the facts just as much as the Right.’
    • ‘The Orleanist monarchy had to weather a challenge from the Right as well as from the Left.’
    • ‘What the Right has been so effective at doing is moving the culture in their direction.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Restore to a normal or upright position.

    ‘we righted the capsized dinghy’
    • ‘It fell back down to the ground and immediately began to right itself again.’
    • ‘The elevator was plummeting and then righted itself.’
    • ‘The boat capsized once but righted itself in minutes.’
    • ‘When I was sure the boat had righted itself I opened up the hatch and got out onto the deck.’
    • ‘As I continue with kayaking, I am becoming more proficient at righting my kayak and feeling more in control of my actions, more knowledgeable and less disoriented.’
    • ‘She was a little dizzy from being righted to a standing position and Wrenn steadied her.’
    • ‘The organisers and planners spent nerve-wracking minutes as Perth went against all planning, going down stern first and initially listed alarmingly to port, before righting herself.’
    • ‘Emergency and environmental services spent most of yesterday clearing up the spillage with low expansion foam before the vehicle could be righted using specialist lifting gear.’
    • ‘Luckily, the boat righted itself after two minutes.’
    • ‘There were no injuries and the vehicle was safely righted shortly afterwards.’
    • ‘As we righted our machines the bus arrived and I'd never seen people move as fast.’
    • ‘The plane wasn't righting itself as it usually did.’
    • ‘Made of lightweight rip-proof nylon, the sturdy design is claimed to be resistant to strong winds, but can be easily righted if inverted.’
    • ‘And if none of that worked, I'd go about the business of righting the ship.’
    • ‘A few stinging shots flayed part of the hull, sending both Serge and Allicia tumbling around as the ship arched threateningly, before righting itself.’
    • ‘After what seemed like five or ten minutes, the plane righted itself and the pilot came on the intercom saying that a ‘nasty man’ had tried to crash the plane.’
    • ‘Traffic crews then had to block all but one lane of the bridge while the crane righted the container.’
    • ‘It righted itself and began to head for Washington again.’
    • ‘Faith nodded soundlessly as her saviour lifted her to her feet as if she weighed nothing, before releasing her so abruptly she staggered a little before righting herself once more.’
    • ‘Over the weekend, a team of navy divers, engineers and foreign consultants injected nitrogen into flooded compartments, partly righting it, Petrobras said.’
    • ‘With a practised flip, he righted the dinghy and held it steady while we clambered aboard.’
    turn the right way up again, turn back over, set upright again, stand upright again
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Restore to a normal or correct condition or situation.
      ‘righting the economy demanded major cuts in defense spending’
      • ‘The harsh figures fly in the face of the bland assurances by certain economists and politicians that the US economy was righting itself after a temporary setback early in the year.’
      • ‘The righting of relationships in the whole community was inseparable from the experience of forgiveness from God.’
      • ‘The foundation problems were solved, the grain elevator was righted, and it is still in use.’
      • ‘Given the progress that businesses have already made and the improving fundamentals for growth, the industrial sector - and the overall economy - may not be too far from righting itself.’
      • ‘That task falls largely to AIB chairman Dermot Gleeson, who must ensure that the internal structures of the bank are righted.’
      • ‘In our RSB initiative we endorse the NC as a place to personally begin, or continue, the long journey of righting relations with the Earth.’
      • ‘It was a situation that soon righted itself as numbers flocked through the door when the familiar sounds of Drive In Scene filled the room.’
      • ‘At this moment he wearied, wishing for nothing but a pause released from time in which he might lie low until the world was righted.’
      • ‘In the long run, such a change has the promise of both righting the economy and undoing social wrongs.’
      • ‘He righted his ruffled cloak, straightened his wrinkled shirt, and glared white hot anger at me.’
      remedy, put right, set right, put to rights, set to rights, rectify, retrieve, solve, fix, resolve, sort out, put in order
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Redress or rectify (a wrong or mistaken action)
      ‘she was determined to right the wrongs done to her father’
      • ‘Treaty settlements - righting the wrongs of the past - have accounted for about 0.1% of total government spending in the past five years.’
      • ‘Until this was righted, she would not return to live in Oz.’
      • ‘One of the longest-running musical miscarriages of justice will be righted when the York tenor behind a famous Christmas song is finally credited for his work.’
      • ‘Environmental justice is the righting of the inequities of the past through laws, regulations, compensation, and removal of the causes of eco-injustice.’
      • ‘Perhaps these inequalities will be righted when the feminist revolution is more thoroughly assimilated.’
      • ‘Mugabe defends the programme as a way of righting racial imbalances in land ownership inherited from British rule, and blames food shortages in what was a regional breadbasket on years of crippling drought.’
      • ‘We must keep in mind that a settlement bill, while it brings to a conclusion a certain phase of a tribe's seeking to have injustice righted, by the same token also represents a beginning.’
      • ‘Thompson believes he is the man to start righting those wrongs.’
      • ‘And, let's face it, as well, I think, at that time, I also was attracted to the notion of being a trial lawyer, a courtroom lawyer, going in and righting the wrongs and defending the unjustly accused.’
      • ‘The wrongs carried out by members of the Church's hierarchy must be righted, but Mr Ahern warned against shutting the Church out of the community.’
      • ‘Honest Reporting cannot possibly claim to be non-partisan: they are avowedly devoted to the cause of righting what they see as a shocking anti-Israeli bias in the western media.’
      • ‘In righting ancient wrongs, it has created modern tension.’
      • ‘Now, 50 years after his death, Emmett Till has inspired a documentary aimed at righting a historic wrong.’
      • ‘First of all, progress toward righting one of the economy's biggest imbalances, excess production capacity caused by overinvestment, has been greater than first thought.’
      • ‘I suspect that his action is more motivated by desire for celebrity, notoriety and financial reward than righting injustices.’
      • ‘The outcome also satisfied the public sense of outrage at an obstinate governmental bureaucracy and at an injustice eventually righted.’
      • ‘Japan has made scant progress in righting the long-term problems that have crippled its domestic economy.’
      • ‘Private analysts underscored the importance of righting unbalanced global economic growth, which is blamed by the US for feeding the US trade deficit.’
      • ‘As the 1980s drew to a close, what made accountability so attractive was that, unlike mainstream reforms, it offered a coherent way of thinking about the problems plaguing the system and a plan for righting them.’
      • ‘So Mo Mowlam went into exile and wrote her side of the story, determined to right the wrongs done to her.’
      rectify, correct, put right, set right, make right, sort out, deal with, remedy, repair, fix, cure, resolve, settle, square, make amends for
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3usually be rightedarchaic Make reparation to (someone) for a wrong done to them.
      ‘we'll see you righted’

exclamation

informal
  • 1Used to indicate one's agreement or to acknowledge a statement or order.

    ‘“Barry's here.” “Oh, right”’
    ‘right you are, sir’
    agreed, settled, all right, very well, that's a bargain, accepted, right
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Used at the end of a statement to invite agreement, approval, or confirmation.
      ‘you went to see Angie on Monday, right?’
      • ‘Both of the things he said had to be questions surely, I mean, French is not that different right?’
      • ‘After the game Devon would be telling his mystery girl his true feelings, right?’
      • ‘As long as he keeps his ugly face off screen, leaving only his annoying voice that is acceptable, right?’
    2. 1.2 Used as a filler in speech or to introduce an utterance, exhortation, or suggestion.
      ‘right, let's have a drink’
      ‘and I didn't think any more of it, right, but Mom said I should take him to a doctor’

Phrases

  • bang to rights

    • informal (of a criminal) with positive proof of guilt.

      ‘we've got you bang to rights handling stolen property’
      • ‘There have been rumours and now he has been caught bang to rights.’
      • ‘If it locks on to your car and you are exceeding the speed limit, they have you bang to rights.’
      • ‘He gave a full and frank admission that he was caught bang to rights.’
      • ‘I hereby certify that I have done nothing whatsoever that I have any intention of telling you about, unless they've got me bang to rights on tape.’
      • ‘I knew I was going to get a ticket because I was bang to rights.’
      • ‘A player flagrantly flaunts the rules, and in doing so, is caught bang to rights.’
      • ‘The downside of this will be that if I ever do commit any kind of crime then the police will pretty much have me bang to rights.’
      • ‘The rule of strict liability applied and he was bang to rights.’
      • ‘The combination of the cards and the video meant that he was bang to rights as far as being there and taking something was concerned, and they are saying that now he is admitting it.’
      • ‘In a police interview played in court he told officers: ‘I'm caught, bang to rights.’’
      in the act, with one's fingers in the till, with one's hand in the till
      View synonyms
  • be in the right

    • Be morally or legally justified in one's views, actions, or decisions.

      • ‘Morally, the Americans were in the right - but they also had greater military success.’
      • ‘Rather, it is often the case that both parties to a dispute genuinely believe themselves to be in the right, and would be happy to make their cases in front of a disinterested third party.’
      • ‘It is a general courtesy in life to apologize for offending someone, even if you think you were in the right.’
      • ‘Arguments aside for a moment, here's my basic two cents on the subject: history is full of examples of people who carried out such actions believing themselves to be in the right.’
      • ‘He ruled with a rod of iron, but he was very fair, and would defend his workmen to the hilt if he thought they were in the right.’
      • ‘Yet I feel I was in the right, I was only a few minutes late.’
      • ‘I talked to a few people about it and they felt I was in the right.’
      • ‘If the child senses your mixed feelings, he may convince himself that he was in the right all along and you are the ‘bad’ one.’
      • ‘He might have been congratulating himself, but one would have to completely ignore his actions to believe that he was in the right.’
      • ‘They always believe themselves to be in the right, no matter how much wickedness they are mired in.’
  • by rights

    • If things had happened or been done fairly or correctly.

      ‘by rights, he should not be playing next week’
      • ‘As the article makes clear, he is one of Britain's best young film actors, but his dedication to home-grown cinema has meant that he's missed out on the big starring roles that should have been his by rights.’
      • ‘Bill Wilde's biography and the volume of her letters which he and Tom Inglis Moore brought out in 1980 should, by rights, have won her new readers, yet the reverse appears to have happened.’
      • ‘Where are the reports on these trips that the commissioner, by rights, should have given to the Parliament to scrutinise to ascertain the value of the trips?’
      • ‘Because if securing male votes was what winning a general election was all about, then by rights the Labour party would have won every general election since 1945.’
      • ‘Fields have been flooded throughout Tayside at a time when, by rights, they should have been full of combines.’
      • ‘And, by rights, I should marry her if she'd have me, but I am still a bit dubious.’
      • ‘Born in Motherwell, into a family where the men were steelworkers, welders or fitters, and the women were nurses or hospital workers, his political interests should by rights have led him into the Labour party organisation.’
      • ‘He said: ‘Now the Deputy PM is being even more useful as he takes all the flak that should by rights be targeted at his boss.’’
      • ‘Many readers will love following Lee's journey, but others will find the author's method a stumbling block in what should have been, by rights, a brilliant book.’
      • ‘In the Catholic church, the archbishops of Glasgow and Edinburgh are equal in rank, but, by rights, O'Brien is the senior partner because he has been in position for 17 years, and is the chair of the Catholic bishops' conference of Scotland.’
      properly, in fairness, correctly, legally, technically, in conscience, in all conscience
      View synonyms
  • do right by

    • Treat (someone) fairly.

      • ‘‘We want to do right by the teachers, but there are things we need to hear from them,’ he said.’
      • ‘But the one thing I do know is that I would have not been doing right by my kids at the time that they really needed me, and that would be something I would have had a hard time living with.’
      • ‘No doubt among the Ukrainian community he was regarded as one of their own and would be trusted to do right by them.’
      • ‘I have always believed in doing right by myself and not doing wrong to others.’
      • ‘He added: ‘The Duke of Marlborough said that the best way to mark a great victory was to do right by the soldiers who fought so bravely with him.’’
      • ‘The general tone is set in this article about how ‘the absence of firm rules and responsible incentives’ has discouraged scientists and engineers from doing right by us all.’
      • ‘I often wonder whether I'm doing right by my children, whether their independence is at risk because I'm wrapping them in cotton wool.’
      • ‘This is our only intention, we want to do right by the residents of Richmond upon Thames.’
      • ‘But my heart is in this, and I want to do right by you.’
      • ‘Rosetta clearly believes that pulling herself up involves grinding somebody else down, but her fear of perpetual poverty is a stronger motivator than any moral imperative to do right by her fellow human beings.’
  • in one's own right

    • As a result of one's own claims, qualifications, or efforts, rather than an association with someone else.

      ‘he was already established as a poet in his own right’
      • ‘I worked for most of my married life and paid a full stamp so that I would qualify for a pension in my own right when I retired but now it still looks as though I'm missing out.’
      • ‘But if the husband's earnings are high, and he is simply mean with his money, the wife is unable to claim in her own right.’
      • ‘She claimed asylum in her own right but, in fact, in February 1998 gave up her application and returned to Ecuador.’
      • ‘His newest work focuses, like Wilde, on a female lead, but the female here is an artist in her own right, rather than the wife of one.’
      • ‘For the first time you will have a pension in your own right.’
      • ‘The performers are all accomplished in their own right, and together they are simply magnificent.’
      • ‘And thanks to all of you who are really legends in your own right.’
      • ‘However, you may not know that Leonard Nimoy is a most capable singer and poet in his own right.’
      • ‘I suppose I would like to be recognised as a good player in my own right rather than a Paul McGrath want-to-be.’
      • ‘She now has a British passport, so qualifies in her own right to compete for Scotland.’
  • (not) in one's right mind

    • (not) sane.

      • ‘What person in their right mind would do something like that?’
      • ‘Please correct me if I'm wrong but who in their right mind would sponsor an event that attracts no spectators!’
      • ‘Who in his right mind would rather work than sleep?’
      • ‘‘Frank was not in his right mind when he set up the device,’ she said, referring to doctors' diagnoses of her husband as suffering from clinical depression.’
      • ‘No one in their right mind would consider an 80-year-old woman a military target.’
      • ‘In my opinion, Whitney was not in her right mind when we had our conversation.’
      • ‘The Premiership is the best league in the world, so who in his right mind wouldn't want to be a manager at that level?’
      • ‘Who in their right mind would do such a ludicrous thing?’
      • ‘‘I suppose if I was in my right mind, I wouldn't have dreamt of it,’ says Nan.’
      • ‘Nobody in their right mind will offer a prize for a competition you've never entered.’
      sane, in one's right mind, of sound mind, in possession of all one's faculties, able to reason clearly, able to think clearly, lucid, rational, coherent, balanced, well balanced
      View synonyms
  • not right in the head

    • informal (of a person) not completely sane.

      • ‘I swear Claire's not right in the head sometimes.’
      • ‘‘He's not right in the head,’ one onlooker was heard to say as Kiwi pilot, Steve Taylor's Edge 540 aerobatic plane twirled and dived overhead like a demented moth.’
      • ‘‘Maybe he's not right in the head,’ he muttered, more to convince himself than Adam or his brothers.’
      • ‘You have just proved you're not right in the head.’
      • ‘He hangs around with Ben and Anthony though, so maybe he's not right in the head.’
      • ‘‘People are going to think I'm not right in the head,’ he protested, following after her.’
      • ‘He said his sister was not right in the head, and had gone crazy and carried out the killings.’
      • ‘Someone needs to lock that woman up, because she's not right in the head if she thinks that looks good.’
      • ‘‘They say how they're not right in the head,’ said Willis.’
      • ‘He tells himself he has no business being in his position if he is not right in the head.’
      sane, in one's right mind, of sound mind, in possession of all one's faculties, able to reason clearly, able to think clearly, lucid, rational, coherent, balanced, well balanced
      View synonyms
  • (as) of right (or by right)

    • As a result of having a moral or legal claim or entitlement.

      ‘the state will be obliged to provide health care and education as of right’
      • ‘Only legal guarantees that they occupy the land by right, as they have since before the arrival of black or white races, will give them the security they seek.’
      • ‘It is not an entitlement as of right; it is the result of a negotiation.’
      • ‘Whilst children can now be tried as adults in Britain, they are often denied the type of legal protection that an older person could expect as of right.’
      • ‘Education, including higher education, belongs as of right to all who have the ability.’
      • ‘Entry to higher education is also very commonly an entitlement, available by right to anyone who obtains the threshold entry certificate.’
      • ‘In other words they're being forced to beg for an education that their more privileged peers received by right.’
      • ‘The circumstances are that there is a discretion under the Act for the Minister to allow a fresh application but there is no entitlement as of right.’
      • ‘I know they feel that they are entitled to a pension as of right.’
      • ‘It is essential for the claimant to establish that, throughout the period of use, he has enjoyed the right he claims as of right.’
      • ‘‘A lot of pensioners are loath to claim it, but it is theirs by right,’ said Mr Evans.’
  • on the right side of

    • 1On the safe, appropriate, or desirable side of.

      ‘a record that fully embraces the theatricality of its genre but falls just on the right side of ridiculous’
      • ‘On occasion this works fine: on Callier's Miles Davis tribute, 4 Miles, his backing band keep their solos just on the right side of overlong.’
      • ‘There's a distinction between rehash and revision, though, and the Black Angels fall on the right side of that fence.’
      • ‘Sounds to me like Krikorian has fully hedged his position so that he can be on the right side of this move either way.’
      • ‘Jamie Bell, of Billy Elliot fame, in particular gives a very mature performance that rests just on the right side of quirky.’
      • ‘Fuel consumption is a good point and most owners should get well on the right side of 30 mpg, even when city driving predominates.’
      • ‘A curious combination of the sweepingly monumental and the irascibly quirky - just on the right side of pretentious, some might say - awaits those prepared to give them a go.’
      • ‘Frears always keeps his drama on the right side of plausibility, if only by a whisker.’
      • ‘The motorway figure of 47 mpg shows the potential on long runs, so most owners should end up on the right side of 40 mpg.’
      • ‘It's useful and desirable, while staying on the right side of fetishistic.’
      • ‘But it stays on the right side of the dividing line between decent value and overpriced, with a three-course meal coming in at around £25, plus wine and service.’
      • ‘But anyone who's reached adulthood and remained on the right side of a pass mark is a pleasure to behold: the bright eyes, the confidence, the goodwill and good-heartedness.’
      1. 1.1In a position to be viewed with favor by.
        ‘he hasn't always remained on the right side of the law’
        • ‘He said: ‘He wants to stay on the right side of the law.’’
        • ‘It is difficult to see what an advertiser hoping to stay on the right side of Ofcom can usefully learn from these rulings, other than that you now need a PhD in gender studies before you can make an acceptable ad.’
        • ‘Being in the commodities business, often combined with being on the right side of the political power structure, was the main factor deciding which Russians made the list - and who dropped down or off it.’
        • ‘I was on the winning side which just proves that it's best to be on the right side of the law!’
        • ‘Consequently, companies took contribution holidays and/or took back some of the surpluses to keep on the right side of the Inland Revenue.’
        • ‘National park rangers have been demonstrating their latest piece of high-tech kit, which should help boat owners on Windermere stay on the right side of the law.’
        • ‘These are the kinds of things that criminals do, yet these people are said to be on the right side of the law.’
        • ‘Smaller companies confused by ever-changing employment laws can learn how to stay on the right side of new regulations at Business First 2004.’
        • ‘Although hands-free equipment can keep drivers on the right side of the law, some experts have warned such kits ignore the spirit of the new legislation and still provide a distraction from the road.’
        • ‘‘The first rule of a parliamentary candidate is ‘Get on the right side of the women’!’’
        • ‘They took good care throughout their reign to keep on the right side of the British for reasons of self-preservation, as much as loyalty to the principle of perpetual friendship prescribed in the peace treaty.’
      2. 1.2Somewhat less than (a specified age)
        ‘she's on the right side of forty’
        • ‘He is just about on the right side of 30 but he looks like he could go on for years yet.’
        • ‘Will it be lineage, caste and community politics or being on the right side of thirty?’
  • put (or set) someone right

    • 1Restore someone to health.

      • ‘Having excited the driver's sympathy with this doleful mention of his wife we were driven round the corner to a cheerful looking café where the driver suggested we should have a cup of tea, because this was ‘sure to set us right.’’
      • ‘I always keep a packet of Kellogg's All Bran and whenever I am in danger, it puts me right again.’
    • 2Make someone understand the true facts of a situation.

      • ‘And who better to set them right than a former TV talk show host, Labour MP and newspaper commentator?’
      • ‘Well of course, this email is irrelevant and what you have of course is the CEO of Customs, Mr Woodward, writing to the various newspapers, putting them right in this regard.’
      • ‘If anyone is prone to believe this superstition, Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable soon puts them right.’
      • ‘Feel free to disagree, tell us why we are wrong, and put us right.’
      • ‘Based on earlier reports we incorrectly overestimated the capacity improvement of the new disk format, thanks for putting us right on that.’
      • ‘Get talking to the owner and he'll delight in putting you right about the ones you didn't know.’
      • ‘There were plenty of critics (including Goethe) who had noted the self-revelatory nature of Shakespeare's plays, and whose articles and commentaries could easily have set him right.’
      • ‘Fellow Mammoth Ellie may think she is a giant-sized possum (one of the more irritating story elements), but once she is set right, there seems a fair chance that mammoths might not face extinction after all.’
      • ‘The ‘After Hours’ quote has the central character getting something a little wrong, and the character who does the correcting flatly and contemptuously sets him right.’
      • ‘If you thought the British were a nation who never complained, Debbie Hurworth would soon be able to put you right.’
  • put (or set) something to rights

    • Restore something to its correct or normal state or condition.

      • ‘We used to spend our nights drinking red wine and putting the world to rights.’
      • ‘That isolation ended several hours ago, when Mrs. Bunyip's baby brother, the self-styled computer expert, arrived to set things to rights.’
      • ‘We don't need Europe to put the world to rights for us either.’
      • ‘He also spoke with undisguised passion about doing good works - displaying all of the principled enthusiasm for setting the world to rights that we should hope to instil in all of our young people.’
      • ‘Marie said: ‘Brian was a very proud man who always tried to put the world to rights.’’
      • ‘Fortunately, Graham is understanding and, when he comes home and finds a cobweb here and an unswept patch there he waits until I'm not looking and puts it to rights for me.’
      • ‘It rather gives the lie to the notion of him as the swaggering self-confident leader of a superpower putting the world to rights.’
      • ‘Hopefully that will put my brain to rights (or, sleep, most likely).’
      • ‘I also need to buy groceries and continue setting up - I've taken a day off this week from putting my apartment to rights, but that's not the way to get rid of the boxes.’
      • ‘Fear not, there's a spray that puts it to rights.’
      remedy, put right, set right, set to rights, rectify, retrieve, solve, fix, resolve, sort out, put in order
      View synonyms
  • (as) right as rain

    • informal (of a person) feeling completely well or healthy, typically after an illness or minor accident.

      healthy, well, fit, fighting fit, in good health, bursting with health, in excellent shape, in fine fettle, fit as a fiddle, fit as a flea, in tip-top condition
      View synonyms
  • right enough

    • informal Certainly; undeniably.

      ‘your record's bad right enough’
      • ‘And right enough it happened - the gaffer got the phone call.’
      • ‘‘It may be a fine building, right enough,’ said one grey-bearded spectator, standing outside the public entrance.’
      • ‘It was a bit rum, right enough: the two had become very firm friends since meeting when the boy was stricken with cancer.’
      • ‘Well, if my guess is correct, this could have been the weapon, right enough.’
      • ‘It will be nice to see him before the whistle goes, right enough.’
      • ‘It's a brilliant and very weird piece of film-making, right enough, and the soundtrack's excellent.’
      • ‘It is getting pretty noisy round here right enough as one of neighbours up the hill seems to have invested in a cockerel.’
      • ‘I nearly collapse afterwards, right enough, but I'm getting there.’
      • ‘Those lines can be a bit difficult, right enough.’
      • ‘They stood up to the occasion, right enough, but all over the pitch, in conditions more conducive to ice-skating, players from both sides were going down.’
  • right on

    • informal Used as an expression of strong support, approval, or encouragement.

      See also right-on
  • a right one

    • informal A silly or foolish person.

      • ‘Well, there's been a few wrong ‘uns at the Lane of late and now the hot seat's got a right one in it!’
  • right side out

    • With the side intended to be seen or used uppermost.

      ‘turn the skirt right side out’
  • she's (or she'll be) right

    • informal That will be all right; don't worry.

      • ‘So during this week's slapdash, hit and miss, ‘no worries, she'll be right mate’ transit, your attention to detail and procedure is going to be deeply appreciated.’
      • ‘You just can't keep saying ‘Oh well, she'll be right, you know, we'll throw a few in a zoo and it'll be great’.’
      • ‘He looked at me, scarcely able to conceal his amusement, and said, ‘Don't worry, she'll be right, Pop, I'll keep a good eye on things.’’
      • ‘This is in the space of a few weeks, we got this incredible turnaround of the Council officers telling us, ‘Yes, yes, she'll be right, we'll be under way soon ’, and then we get hit in the face with this.’
      • ‘When fear, despair, anger or sadness threaten, all you have to do is compose a short sentence and she'll be right.’
      • ‘And when the light flicker, just as the plane is struck by lightning, you can turn to them and say, honestly I might add: ‘No worries mate, she'll be right’.’

Origin

Old English riht (adjective and noun), rihtan (verb), rihte (adverb), of Germanic origin; related to Latin rectus ‘ruled’, from an Indo-European root denoting movement in a straight line.

Pronunciation

right

/rīt//raɪt/