Main definitions of riding in US English:

: riding1riding2

riding1

noun

  • The sport or activity of riding horses.

    ‘I found him in the stables, getting ready to go riding’
    • ‘She specialises in conveyancing, probate, wills and matrimonial work, and in her spare time enjoys skiing, sailing, riding, theatre and eating out.’
    • ‘Let an experienced riding instructor judge your skills and choose a horse for you.’
    • ‘The guide showed us a little of the town, and we walked behind the castle to see the long walk where the queen goes riding.’
    • ‘If you're a keen racer, show jumper, or you just enjoy riding; nothing is better than owning your own horse.’
    • ‘The exercise involved in riding helps to develop balance.’
    • ‘A big part of riding is creating a level of trust, friendship really, between a horse and rider.’
    • ‘Shortly after returning to competitive riding, she suffered a shoulder injury in June during training hours.’
    • ‘She had known Stuart since she was fourteen and they often went riding together.’
    • ‘The immediate area provides some great walking, and the house is a perfect base for fishing, golf, riding, sailing or cycling.’
    • ‘Her riding career began when she was given a pony for her third birthday and it was soon clear that she had natural talent.’
    • ‘Riding did not just teach Elle a love for horses - it helped her learn to walk and talk again.’
    • ‘The Championships were marked by the determination of the judges to reward good training, good riding and the cooperation and obedience of the horses.’
    • ‘I love dressage and I have tried basic moves with my riding teacher.’
    • ‘He thought maybe they could go riding, or hunting.’
    • ‘On a typical day, he claimed, he would rise at seven, take a cold bath, drink a glass of milk and go riding.’
    • ‘She has now vowed not to go riding in the area again until after Christmas and the New Year, when the firework season is over.’
    • ‘He was invited to go riding with the president at his ranch in Texas.’
    • ‘They have strict rules about proper riding gear and behavior on the trails.’

Pronunciation

riding

/ˈrīdiNG//ˈraɪdɪŋ/

Main definitions of riding in US English:

: riding1riding2

riding2

noun

  • 1usually the East/North/West RidingOne of three former administrative divisions of Yorkshire.

    • ‘The worst were the East and West Ridings, Lincolnshire, Birmingham, Manchester and Staffordshire.’
  • 2An electoral district of Canada.

    • ‘Mr Toews has run a positive campaign and presented his ideas and his beliefs for the riding and for Canada.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, in 1,168 schools located in 267 ridings, over 265,000 students cast ballots.’
    • ‘In close ridings, voters are often forced to act against their real preferences.’
    • ‘The Liberals also benefited from the Alliance and the Tories splitting the right-wing vote in several Ontario ridings, though both parties have so far rejected the idea of merging.’
    • ‘As illustrated in Table 1, the Conservatives won these elections by winning all the ridings in which there was no substantial French-speaking population.’
    • ‘Because ridings have different numbers of eligible voters, the percentage of the popular vote won does not automatically translate into a proportional number of parliamentary seats won.’
    • ‘Does anyone remember when he said Liberal Party members would select candidates in their ridings by ballot in a democratic election?’
    • ‘Outraged feminist militants left the party and proceeded to dismantle the committees on the status of women that had been set up in various ridings.’
    • ‘Most issues do not involve a clear choice between riding and party and it is not easy to determine majority opinion in a riding, even if its MP wanted to.’
    • ‘The country is divided into districts or ridings electing one MP each.’
    • ‘In 1993, the Bloc captured more than two thirds of Quebec ridings and became the official opposition.’
    • ‘The best the local Liberals can hope for now is that the newly merged Conservative Party of Canada selects a no-name candidate to run in the riding of Richmond.’
    • ‘In this election, the NDP will largely ignore Ontario, Quebec, and all but a handful of ridings in its traditional Western base, to concentrate on trying to retain the seven seats it won in the Maritimes in 1997.’
    • ‘An election in the disputed riding saw William McCullock, the man who should have been awarded the seat in the first place, lose to newcomer Victor Timbro.’
    • ‘‘Only if Hamm, [the Health Minister Jamie] Muir and the other ministers feel their support eroding in their own ridings will they yield,’ she said.’
    • ‘The Canada Elections Act says a person must vote in the riding where he or she ordinarily resides and not where mail is delivered.’
    • ‘In no previous election had the Liberal share of the major party vote been more than 22% higher in the French than in the English ridings.’
    • ‘While the phrase ‘assisting individual constituents’ is fairly straightforward, Docherty might have better explained exactly what services they procure for their ridings and how they do so.’
    • ‘Their analysis illustrates a dramatic increase in Conservative party spending at the constituency level in francophone ridings (Carty and Eagles).’
    • ‘In response, the party decided to use tele-voting in those ridings.’

Origin

Old English trithing, from Old Norse thrithjungr ‘third part’, from thrithi ‘third’. The initial th- was lost due to assimilation with the preceding -t of East, West, or with the -th of North.

Pronunciation

riding

/ˈrīdiNG//ˈraɪdɪŋ/