Main definitions of reveal in English

: reveal1reveal2

reveal1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Make (previously unknown or secret information) known to others.

    ‘Brenda was forced to reveal Robbie's whereabouts’
    [with clause] ‘he revealed that he and his children had received death threats’
    • ‘Maybe Gardaí have a secret file which reveals that criminals in Ireland are camera shy.’
    • ‘If Walt died, then he died without his beloved wife telling him an important secret, revealing something vital she knows about his past.’
    • ‘Questions by inquisitive inspectors were answered carefully to avoid revealing new information.’
    • ‘Fairweather said concern about revealing operational information was the reason why he refused to talk to programme makers.’
    • ‘Their revealing classified information to an uncleared person was a very black-and-white issue.’
    • ‘So, did a more thorough check of the man reveal this critical new information?’
    • ‘The latest court filing reveals Intel has until 6 September to respond the complaint.’
    • ‘Hastie was previously reluctant to reveal details of the contracts until he was sure the company had a secure future.’
    • ‘Victoria Beckham has revealed her husband's secret fear when he captains England.’
    • ‘The secret file reveals Cabinet Office officials blocked the award.’
    • ‘Criminal proceedings may possibly follow, so no further information could be revealed.’
    • ‘Spiritual guides hang out in relaxed places where they can be of assistance to others without revealing their supernatural powers.’
    • ‘One of the mysteries of the age is why people are so ready to reveal the most intimate secrets of their lives to television cameras.’
    • ‘And what a way they went about revealing the unknown musical facet in them and proved all the doubting Thomases wrong.’
    • ‘I call on the Government to publish its secret report revealing just how much the sheep ID scheme will cost farmers.’
    • ‘Careful inspection can reveal evidence of forced entry or different types of locks.’
    • ‘The article described in gloating detail all of the things that they'd bought with their bingo winnings and gave several nuggets of information revealing what their lives had been like before and after the win.’
    • ‘Expect the latter to reveal one of the secrets of his success: not sleeping.’
    • ‘Is there a difference between revealing the information there, or on the stand?’
    • ‘Below them were rosy cheeks, revealing the poorly concealed secret that Ryel was in fact drunk.’
    divulge, disclose, tell, let out, let slip, let drop, let fall, give away, give the game away, give the show away, babble, give out, release, leak, betray, open up, unveil, bring out into the open
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Cause or allow (something) to be seen.
      ‘the clouds were breaking up to reveal a clear blue sky’
      • ‘They located chestnut trees with ominous breaks in the bark revealing blobs of orange fungus.’
      • ‘As light and temperatures drop, the leaves stop making chlorophyll and it breaks down, revealing the colours underneath.’
      • ‘The professor refuses to reveal the film until she completes a task for him.’
      • ‘It conceals only superficially, for it can allow us to reveal our true self.’
      • ‘The gloomy sky had broken up, revealing patches of sky blue.’
      • ‘He lifted his eyes to the sky that had begun to clear, revealing blue sky.’
      • ‘Most of the people cleared out, revealing a young girl.’
      • ‘Dawn broke to reveal the amazing sight of camp beds and sleeping bags almost encircling the All-England Club.’
      • ‘His fears are confirmed when he spies a curious Post-It note on the fridge revealing an unfinished game of hangman.’
      • ‘Jim walked to it and removed the head mask, revealing a human face, covered in dried blood, missing an ear, and half of a cheek.’
      • ‘Then there was a grating sound, and a panel slid back to reveal a couple of humans outside.’
      • ‘The tiny beam of light hit the fridge revealing a photo of a middle-aged woman and two boys.’
      • ‘Someone had taken off his boots, revealing his blue socks.’
      • ‘Some years ago, an advisor tried to get Hillary Clinton to soften her image by publicly revealing some hitherto unknown weakness.’
      • ‘The blue faded away revealing a cast of reds, oranges, pinks and purples.’
      • ‘Toeing the government line has allowed film-makers to avoid revealing the humanity of their subjects, lest a breath of truth threaten the house of cards that is the drug war.’
      • ‘Lush jungle sweeps by at arm's length, breaking occasionally to reveal lakes, mountains and ships.’
      • ‘‘There's a bit of emotion in me - I do break down,’ he admits, revealing a soft side.’
      • ‘When the blade is dull, the end is simply broken off to reveal another sharp tip.’
      • ‘Her blue eyes twinkled to reveal a gentle nature and shone as her lips were curved in a smile.’
    2. 1.2Make (something) known to humans by divine or supernatural means.
      ‘the truth revealed at the Incarnation’
      • ‘Pleased by the service of his devotee, the Supreme Personality of Godhead reveals his form and opulences.’
      • ‘The Lord is revealing the devices of Satan so that Christians can learn to battle the real enemy as he attacks their lives, instead of battling one another.’
      • ‘That's where God takes our experience and reveals the spiritual treasures they contain.’
      • ‘First of all, parents and children should pray and ask the Lord for the truth about this game so He can reveal it to you.’
      • ‘This humanity revealed the divinity which is the splendour of the three persons.’
      • ‘The Holy Spirit even reveals things taught during Jesus' ministry but not recorded in any of the four gospels.’
      • ‘For him it was a means of revealing the divine principle and concretizing a personal vision of the Supreme Being that had been vouchsafed to him.’
      • ‘People as well as objects may reveal the presence of the supernatural.’
      • ‘Likewise, Scripture reveals that God himself exists in the Trinity.’
      • ‘Lord Siva's revealing grace is how souls awaken to their true, divine nature.’
      • ‘In Christian teaching, the doctrine of the incarnation is crucial in revealing the nature of God.’
      • ‘Every time we choose generosity, truth or integrity we are revealing God in this world.’
      • ‘We do not hesitate to embrace the truth no matter how and when it is revealed to us.’
      • ‘The Rishi speaks in theistic terms, revealing the religious nature of the Vedas.’
      • ‘Everything is an icon revealing God and indicating a way to God.’
      • ‘So you can't split the human and the divine, the human in fact reveals the divine.’
      • ‘You have dared to imprint us with your own image knowing that we are only human, inviting us to be fully human by revealing your presence in us to everyone we meet.’
      • ‘Enfold these gifts into a greater offering that reveals God's wondrous love to all who seek it.’
      • ‘The Gospel of John reveals this divine aspect of Christ's ministry - His deity.’
      • ‘Under this name, Chih-i could speak of truth as a dynamic power in the world revealing the marvellous nature of things to all beings.’

noun

  • (in a movie or television show) a final revelation of information that has previously been kept from the characters or viewers.

    ‘the big reveal at the end of the movie answers all questions’
    • ‘When the reveal comes, it comes as a shock - the film feeds us all the right clues and we read them completely differently.’
    • ‘The authors are faithful to the original tales, going so far as to allow Holmes to keep pertinent information to himself until the big reveal.’
    • ‘I found not the reveal to be the real shocker, but the last scene more so.’
    • ‘The reveal is the high point of the show - this is where the neighbors get to see what's happened to their room.’
    • ‘The plot is twist-heavy, and banks a lot of its punch on the big reveal at the end, which, while satisfying, is hugely predictable.’
    • ‘After all the set up, the reveal/twist is so underplayed as to make no sense - there are no consequences to anybody's actions.’
    • ‘The pacing works especially well, with the big big reveal of Chucky's true nature coming at about the halfway point.’
    • ‘The reveal at the end, while not obvious was a little 2 + 2 = 4 and it didn't seem to be trying to say anything interesting or deep.’
    • ‘The reveal makes no manner of sense and the motive is certainly shaky.’
    • ‘Every week promised a new pairing, a bitter feud, and a shocking reveal (usually in the last few minutes) that changed everything for the characters.’
    • ‘The big reveal is more melancholy than terrifying, and in questionable taste.’
    • ‘There is a twist in Spider Forest, but unlike the films of M. Night Shyamalan, there is so much more at play here than simply getting us to the reveal.’
    • ‘The big reveal in the last episode was anticlimactic: oh boy, a minor character we don't remotely care about is a traitor!’
    • ‘Murray paces the sequence perfectly and shows a real gift in never rushing the reveal.’
    • ‘After the reveal, or critical moment, we really don't need to see anything else: the rest is predictable.’
    • ‘The reveal about his past is one of the greatest treats Mad Men has to offer this season.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French reveler or Latin revelare, from re- again (expressing reversal) + velum veil.

Pronunciation:

reveal

/rəˈvēl/

Main definitions of reveal in English

: reveal1reveal2

reveal2

noun

  • Either side surface of an aperture in a wall for a door or window.

    • ‘A flush finishing metal door/window frame is provided for a reveal of an opening in a wall that has a pair of oppositely positioned wall board sheets.’
    • ‘Align the mitered end of the head casing with the corner of the reveal, and mark the point where the far end meets the reveal.’
    • ‘The reveal will give your doorjamb a cleaner, more finished look.’

Origin

Late 17th century: from obsolete revale to lower from Old French revaler, from re- back + avaler go down, sink.

Pronunciation:

reveal

/rəˈvēl/