Definition of result in English:

result

noun

  • 1A consequence, effect, or outcome of something.

    ‘the tower collapsed as a result of safety violations’
    • ‘Finally, the company was most concerned about losses it anticipated as a result of the termination of contracts as the war ran down.’
    • ‘We are a bit surprised by the mixed results of our survey.’
    • ‘But the group could not achieve a consensus as a result of which the issue has been kicked over into next year.’
    • ‘Success was the direct result of collaboration between two hospitals to improve and standardize care.’
    • ‘The area of contaminated soils and water basins is constantly growing as a result of the production of energy resources.’
    • ‘As a result of product life cycle coming into play, prices have decreased significantly in these technologies.’
    • ‘Paying interest as a result of failure to pay off credit card bills makes the price of the charged items a great deal more expensive.’
    • ‘The company said it was unlikely it would have to re-state historical results as a result of the misdated stock grants.’
    • ‘Consequently no charges will be forthcoming as a result of the investigation.’
    • ‘There were dramatic increases in productivity as a result of this product.’
    • ‘He is, even more importantly, and as a result of these successes, the creator and propagator of a style.’
    • ‘Utilities expanding into home services insurance provision have had success as a result of realizing this opportunity.’
    • ‘What we therefore see in the final concert is the result of hours and hours of preparation.’
    • ‘However, the country is not self-sufficient in producing grain as a result of the limited arable land.’
    • ‘She also had a set of worn down glasses, its lenses cracked as a result of successive collisions with the ground.’
    • ‘And as a result of all this activity the company has delayed the announcement of its interim results, which were due out today.’
    • ‘In the meantime, the company has over £203m in the bank as a result of two successful fundraisings during the year.’
    • ‘As a result of this success, additional spawning substrate will be placed at suitable locations in the Elk River in the near future.’
    • ‘Soft tissue injuries are usually the result of a motion type injury.’
    • ‘As a result of the overall hospitality, the production company hopes that the guests will want to return and will spread the word amongst the industry.’
    • ‘Monetary expansion also undermines the pool of funding as a result of the consequent decline in interest rates.’
    • ‘And as a result of those endeavours the product then becomes a market success.’
    • ‘Perhaps as a result of the success of the wild turkeys, Shenandoah embarked on a more ambitious project later that year.’
    consequence, outcome, upshot, out-turn, sequel, effect, reaction, repercussion, reverberation, ramification, end, conclusion, termination, culmination, corollary, concomitant, aftermath, footprint, fruit, fruits, product, produce, by-product, solution
    verdict, decision, outcome, conclusion, opinion, determination, judgement, adjudication, arbitration, findings, ruling, pronouncement, decree, settlement, order
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An item of information obtained by experiment or some other scientific method; a quantity or formula obtained by calculation.
      • ‘A possible reason for the failure of previous studies to consistently obtain similar results may well be due to sampling bias.’
      • ‘Arlyn dramatically handed over the results to Casey, who scanned it instantly, comparing it to her results from her own experiments and her text books.’
      • ‘Unlike some other girls, Karen never rambles on and on about lab results for some complicated experiment she's conducting.’
      • ‘Librarians usually arrange search results and other information products into customized sets for their clients.’
      • ‘The graph may seem odd at the moment, but looking at the results will show the information.’
      • ‘The results of these three experiments suggest that there are many ways to feed young growing horses.’
      • ‘To obtain objective results, it's important to carry out the testing in a controlled environment.’
      • ‘Based on this information, the model could be adjusted and new, more accurate results obtained.’
      • ‘I have never missed the opportunity of tracing one of these experiments to its results; and I assure you that I have never been able to discover a single case of success.’
      • ‘Furthermore, the experimental results are consistent with the natural pattern of success at nests.’
      • ‘As computational power increases, fewer compromises are made, and more accurate results can be obtained.’
      • ‘And very often the results of these overclocking experiments can turn out quite unexpected.’
      • ‘He followed Jason and pretty soon he was looking at the tabulated results from their experiment the day before.’
      • ‘However, as will become evident, the results of the experiment are so strong that our mistake could not have made any difference.’
      • ‘The results of the calculations are used by the computer to adjust the application rate of each chemical as the tractor moves along.’
      • ‘These results are repeatable, in that we ran them six times over two days, and obtained essentially identical results.’
      • ‘The equations were also estimated with ordinary least squares regression, and very similar results were obtained.’
      • ‘Tom began talking quantifiable results… hard scientific evidence that would prove the surgery would work.’
      • ‘It's probably because of this complex and uncontrolled variation that the results of the experiment were somewhat messy.’
      • ‘If the result of the calculation is correct, the information transferred is correct.’
      • ‘The results of the experiment are published in Wednesday's edition of Nature.’
      answer, solution, calculation
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2often results A final score, mark, or placing in a sporting event or examination.
      • ‘The examination results had been released the day before.’
      • ‘Team game results and all the usual controversies of the season were discussed.’
      • ‘Details of every participating athlete and volunteer, as well as event results, will be stored on the network.’
      • ‘Yesterday's A-level results confirmed a clean sweep for girls over boys in every school examination.’
      • ‘The proof will be given to me, and you show the test papers with the score or the results with your teacher's signature on it.’
      • ‘Their exam results at the final test were the highest and they deserved one little prize.’
      • ‘A panel of choreographers, artistic directors, and former dancers tallies these results into a final score.’
      • ‘Ladbrokes said it had benefited from a good run of results at events including the Cheltenham Festival, the Grand National and Euro 2004.’
      • ‘But the results of a contest sponsored by the German Language Council were not out before the deadline for e-mailing the text for the column.’
      • ‘The results of that examination will be known on Tuesday.’
      • ‘Thousands of Bolton teenagers are anxiously awaiting the release of their A-level exam results on Thursday.’
      • ‘Here are the results of the example game between Aaron, Brad, Christine, Dave, Elena, and Frank.’
      • ‘Finally the results of both games are added together and the final result will be recorded on paper.’
      • ‘My final term results reflected an excellent score and I somehow managed to secure a modest job.’
      • ‘The machine gave some musical bleeps and displayed the result of the game in large, colourful letters.’
      • ‘Until now the top state schools have performed as well, if not better, than the top private schools in academic, sporting and cultural results.’
      • ‘In science, the number of students who scored below average results grew the most of any category.’
      • ‘The British Council has also stepped into this arena, with analysis of the impact of substitutions on the results of football games.’
      • ‘Schools at both ends of the educational spectrum reported their best GCSE results ever yesterday.’
      • ‘She was getting her final results back for maths.’
      mark, score, percentage, grade, grading, rating, place, placing, position, rank, ranking
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3often results A satisfactory or favorable outcome of an undertaking or contest.
      ‘determination and persistence guarantee results’
      • ‘Obviously past performance does not guarantee similar future results.’
      • ‘It had been a month since we started the game and the results were only starting to trickle in.’
      • ‘A long and boring process this may be, but you are guaranteed the results at the end of it.’
      • ‘Avoid professionals who guarantee results or claim they can get you larger refunds than other preparers.’
      • ‘With proper construction in the hands of a skilled cabinetmaker, what wonderful results can be obtained by the craftsman.’
      • ‘Part of the reason is because, as the mutual fund ads say, past performance is no guarantee of future results.’
      • ‘This would probably take a few days time, and she couldn't guarantee them results even if she did manage to get in.’
      • ‘Best results will be obtained by applying tank mixtures promptly.’
      • ‘So far, quickest results have been obtained when the composting was done in a closed container with the material stirred by a mixing auger.’
      • ‘The first experiment to produce results explored the patterns of seed flight.’
    4. 1.4usually results The outcome of a business's trading over a given period, expressed as a statement of profit or loss.
      ‘oil companies have reported markedly better results’
      • ‘Psion itself reported impressive results showing a 47 per cent increase in sales over the same period last year.’
      • ‘Elan is in the closed period before it reports results for the first quarter of 2003.’
      • ‘Analysts are not expecting any surprises in the hotel group's results following its pre-closed period trading statement in April.’
      • ‘The company reported strong profit margins in its fourth quarter results, although revenues were below expectations.’
      • ‘Freddie told investors it wouldn't report 2004 results until March of 2005.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Occur or follow as the consequence of something.

    ‘talk of a general election and the resulting political uncertainty’
    ‘government unpopularity resulting from the state of the economy’
    • ‘Denmark's book resulted from a multidisciplinary exercise involving academics from different countries.’
    • ‘The political power of these four groups resulted from their particular ability to influence voters.’
    • ‘In an attempt to avoid the confusions that resulted from the similarity between their names, Dear changed his surname to Dearden.’
    • ‘Soil depletion has resulted, since the land is never left unplanted to regain its nutrients.’
    • ‘This study of the period 1880 to 1947 concentrates on ideas, and not on the policies which resulted from them.’
    • ‘The indirect effect is the wealth effect resulting from having more equity in a home.’
    • ‘It is interesting to note that the 1970s corn blight resulted from an attempt to introduce an element of diversity to the corn plant.’
    • ‘The nature reserve is covered with quarry pits, grooves, and mines resulting from Roman and later workings.’
    • ‘This book resulted from his belief that today's environmentalism has gone astray from its original roots and ethical values.’
    • ‘The three-tier stadium design resulted from a specific requirement that spectators be closer to the field.’
    • ‘The interior of the Great Pyramid is complex, almost certainly resulting from a number of changes of plan.’
    • ‘This is a fine example of a late Roman town house, resulting from several stages of rebuilding.’
    • ‘Drought during those two years mainly resulted from a lack of growing season precipitation.’
    • ‘Swallow describes the music on this record as resulting from a compositional challenge he'd set himself.’
    • ‘We often worry about the toxicity resulting from spraying crops but we rarely worry about those from not spraying them.’
    • ‘In part, these successes resulted from changes in national forest policies and practices.’
    • ‘Political instability has resulted from the inability of leaders to gain support outside their regional bases.’
    • ‘The new state was weighed down by the huge debts resulting from the wars of independence.’
    • ‘The participants were also asked to label any groups or subgroups that resulted from their sorting.’
    • ‘The best thing that ever happened to our company was the Internet and the globalization that resulted from it.’
    follow, ensue, develop, stem, spring, arise, derive, evolve, proceed, emerge, emanate, issue, flow
    end in, culminate in, finish in, terminate in, involve, lead to, prompt, elicit, precipitate, trigger, spark off, provoke
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1result in Have (a specified end or outcome)
      ‘talks in July had resulted in stalemate’
      • ‘Daria contracts a serious illness that results in her losing certain functions.’
      • ‘The country's heavy use of unwashed coal results in large emissions of sulphur dioxide and particulate matter.’
      • ‘Even assembling a variety of ancient sources does not necessarily result in a truthful or complete picture.’
      • ‘A strong global demand for sulfur is also resulting in higher costs for this major input.’
      • ‘Self-management promotes worker responsibility and results in workers taking on a higher workload.’
      • ‘But the things that I learnt during the year have resulted in me getting the jobs I have had since.’
      • ‘The group continues to generate cash and a new warehouse will result in significant cost savings.’
      • ‘This method of calculating payments results in higher costs should you repay your loan early.’
      • ‘Less friction results in less effort involved in sliding the mouse across the surface.’
      • ‘In May and June rainfall may be erratic, resulting in a high risk for growth failure of early seeds.’
      result in, cause, bring on, bring about, call forth, give rise to, be the cause of, make happen, create, produce, occasion, effect, engender, generate, contribute to, be conducive to, add to, be instrumental in, have a hand in, have a part in, help, promote, advance
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • without result

    • In vain.

      ‘Danny had inquired about getting work, without result’
      • ‘I intuited that the adventure would be defined by eight hours of smelling diesel exhaust and watching hooks drag through the water without result.’
      • ‘Taken to Wellington's headquarters, she explained the situation; a search was organised, but without result.’
      • ‘They have even sent her portrait to newspapers in South East Asia, but so far without result, and, without identifying her it is hard to establish how she died.’
      • ‘Police have made house-to-house inquiries, sent witness appeal letters to holidaymakers staying in the area and traced walkers using the Pennine Way at the time, as well as searching national missing person records, but without result.’
      • ‘That, in turn, might lead to the trial itself being brought to a premature end without result, and in consequence, the needless expenditure of much public money.’
      • ‘But I am also dismayed that this investigation has taken this long without result.’
      • ‘Sara was wide awake for a while, thinking without result.’
      • ‘He has had every topical application available multiple times without result.’
      • ‘A meeting held in Geneva following April also ended without result.’
      • ‘They are also trying to find clues through other South East Asian communities, visiting London's Chinatown and issuing appeals in Chinese language newspapers and on cable TV channels, so far without result.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb): from medieval Latin resultare ‘to result’, earlier in the sense ‘spring back’, from re- (expressing intensive force) + saltare (frequentative of salire ‘to jump’). The noun dates from the early 17th century.

Pronunciation

result

/rəˈzəlt//rəˈzəlt/