Definition of resistance in US English:

resistance

noun

  • 1The refusal to accept or comply with something; the attempt to prevent something by action or argument.

    ‘she put up no resistance to being led away’
    • ‘Many people seem to take this for granted and consider all resistance futile.’
    • ‘But, while Britain may have led the world in interest in animal welfare, British governments have led the world in resistance to change.’
    • ‘Before gay and lesbian couples can march off to the chapel to get married, there will be plenty of obstacles and lots of resistance from forces opposed to gay marriage.’
    • ‘It is understood that the Queen's courtiers put up strong resistance to his purchase of the lease, because they feared that it would put a strain on Edward's finances.’
    • ‘But there has been considerable resistance to changes that would see schools abandon attempts to maintain a welcoming atmosphere.’
    • ‘Political leaders are confronted suddenly with a new set of conditions that makes continued resistance futile.’
    • ‘They used to be frequently invoked as an inspiring example of heroic resistance to injustice and oppression.’
    • ‘The abbey was dissolved in 1539 during Henry VIII's fallout with Rome but became a centre of resistance to Henry's moves against Catholicism.’
    • ‘Bloom's theory, by contrast, turns on the notion of involuntary imitation, and (conscious or unconscious) resistance to it.’
    • ‘With the utmost resistance I forced my eyes open.’
    • ‘Perhaps any film industry resistance to a rock star making a movie had less to do with prejudice than with the disaster that inevitably unfolds when musicians decide to dabble in film.’
    • ‘British mobile phone operators are likely to mount strong resistance to any flat fee, although they may be more receptive to a single tariff for the island of Ireland.’
    • ‘While more young people want to live in a new home, recent research suggests resistance to modern houses is strongest among older and better-off people.’
    • ‘‘There was some resistance to our vintage section because some customers thought it was too expensive,’ said Kate.’
    • ‘They encountered considerable resistance on the part of small farmers and others, particular in mountain communities.’
    • ‘By and large, universities offered remarkably little resistance to these changes, bending the knee whenever their funding masters passed by.’
    • ‘There will be resistance to breaking down more than 300 years of tradition, and there are undoubtedly question marks remaining about competition issues.’
    • ‘Police and troops deployed around the parliament building failed to offer any resistance to the demonstrators who stormed into the main chamber.’
    • ‘While striking workers put up no resistance, violence flared later following the island's largest demonstration in years.’
    • ‘Indeed, though most Americans will embrace some type of solemn memorial today, there is resistance to dwelling on the horrifying tragedies of a year ago.’
    opposition to, hostility to, aversion to, refusal to accept, unwillingness to accept, disinclination to accept, reluctance to accept, lack of enthusiasm for
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Armed or violent opposition.
      ‘government forces were unable to crush guerrilla-style resistance’
      • ‘In April 1943, SS attempts to deport more Jews to the death camps were met with armed resistance.’
      • ‘Federal authorities vigorously enforced later drafts, employing sufficient military force to quell any resistance.’
      • ‘The historiography reveals insights into the authoritarian mindset of freedom fighters shaped as a product of oppression and armed resistance.’
      • ‘Fighting raged in the capital on Sunday with forces meeting fierce resistance in their efforts to capture the city.’
      • ‘As the enemy resistance crumbled and forces melted away, more of the coalition's combat forces were assigned to other missions.’
      • ‘After his death, the legend of the ex-president's armed resistance persisted - and was embellished.’
      • ‘The garrison of Kilkenny surrendered without putting up much resistance and Cromwell's forces entered the town without losing a man.’
      • ‘Small groups must move rapidly to seize critical nodes in a building, while a follow-on force deals with remaining resistance.’
      • ‘Three soldiers were killed as the coalition forces met fierce resistance.’
      • ‘He claimed there had been no armed resistance since Monday and that soldiers had been ordered to try and take the airport by peaceful persuasion.’
      • ‘But everywhere the employers put up violent resistance.’
      • ‘All of these tasks would have to be performed in situations where the threat of armed resistance is real and present.’
      • ‘Security forces could employ the weapon to overcome resistance without resorting to force, their paramount aim.’
      • ‘He even threatened armed resistance against the coalition, if it evolved into a force of occupation and stayed too long.’
      • ‘This has led people to view armed resistance as the only means left to defend themselves.’
      • ‘The limits of armed resistance were demonstrated, but the reputation of the royal house, uncorrupted by having to work within the system, was enhanced.’
      • ‘However, there was no information on whether security forces had encountered resistance as they retook the town.’
      • ‘Most acts of armed resistance were localized and ephemeral.’
      • ‘There was little armed resistance in either of those countries after the armistices had been signed.’
      • ‘But they have been saying for months that there could be civil unrest, there could be resistance with force of arms.’
      • ‘Sometimes it will be young patriots, new to combat, who have signed up for armed resistance against a foreign occupier.’
      • ‘It was also a reminder of the threat of armed resistance.’
      • ‘Where is the ethical norm that stipulates resistance against murderous force without any concern for one's own security?’
      • ‘Every instance of violent resistance polarized the political debate and made it more difficult to reach an agreement over which policy to pursue.’
      • ‘To their surprise, though, they met significant resistance from loyalist forces.’
      • ‘Some fled the missions; others finally decided that armed resistance was necessary.’
      • ‘Concern over violent resistance only increased following demonstrations in Quebec, Gothenburg, and Genoa.’
      • ‘U.S. forces have cited armed resistance from inside the complex as the main reason they could not seal off the museum and prevent the looting.’
      • ‘Sanna hadn't even considered what she'd do if they encountered armed resistance.’
      • ‘If the intent to stop this madness is forced to go through the path of resistance and violence, than so so be it.’
      • ‘The resulting instability of such a reproduction process manifests itself in death squads and disappearances that only inspired more armed resistance.’
      • ‘On the way, they'd been attacked by brigands again, but they'd scarpered as soon as they realised the team was capable of offering armed resistance.’
      • ‘Support for the so called resistance or newer anti-occupation forces will mean bloodshed on a much greater scale than there is at present.’
      • ‘It broke down not because it met with stiff physical resistance from security forces but more because it was an ideological flop.’
      • ‘Massive reprisals were carried out and were not followed by an upsurge of armed resistance.’
      opposition, fight, battle, stand, struggle, confrontation, defiance
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2in singular A secret organization resisting authority, especially in an occupied country.
      • ‘This was because of the Norwegian resistance movement, which managed to make some trouble for the Nazi occupation.’
      • ‘He would be a freedom fighter, a resistance fighter.’
      • ‘But the hopes of the resistance movement - 80 percent Communist - were dashed.’
      • ‘The Dutch resistance movement came about because of two simple facts - outrage that their country had been invaded and sheer horror at what happened to the Dutch Jews.’
      • ‘A resistance movement emerged on a scale that the military had not anticipated.’
      • ‘The leader of this resistance movement is a mysterious figure known only as Kuato.’
      • ‘Communist groups throughout Europe had done little to assist any resistance movement in Nazi-occupied Europe.’
      • ‘Poland's resistance movement could concentrate all its resources on a common enemy.’
      • ‘The Norwegian resistance movement played an important part in World War Two.’
      • ‘The resistance movement of Yugoslavia played an important role in World War Two.’
      • ‘She would, of course, provide a rallying point for any resistance movement, so she must be eliminated.’
      • ‘They seem to be running some sort of resistance movement.’
      • ‘The Communist Party was at the heart of the resistance movement.’
      • ‘The resistance movement of Greece played a relatively small part in the whole scheme of events in the eastern Mediterranean during World War Two.’
      • ‘Suddenly, the man, who as a 16-year-old was a member of the Polish resistance movement, fell to the ground on his knees clutching his chest.’
      • ‘What if this woman isn't the member of some resistance movement?’
      • ‘The resistance movement has pinned down our soldiers and contractors as enemy occupiers.’
      • ‘However, there is no resistance movement to fuel such an uprising.’
      • ‘But many people said that it was the Italian resistance movement that liberated Italy from fascism.’
      • ‘A resistance movement targets the occupiers, not the occupied.’
      underground, freedom fighters, partisans, guerrillas
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3the Resistance The underground movement formed in France during World War II to fight the German occupying forces and the Vichy government.
      Also called maquis
      • ‘The teenage Giscard was in the French Resistance during World War II.’
      • ‘Everything Hollywood taught me about the Resistance is wrong.’
      • ‘The French Resistance supplied the Allies with vital intelligence reports as well as doing a huge amount of work to disrupt the German supply and communication lines within France.’
      • ‘While serving with the French Free Forces of the Interior, he met a girl, also from the south of France, who was in the Resistance.’
      • ‘Over the course of the war, the French Resistance scored key victories against the German occupations forces.’
  • 2The ability not to be affected by something, especially adversely.

    ‘some of us have a lower resistance to cold than others’
    • ‘The gene content of chromosomal segments conditioning quantitative resistance to multiple pathogens was inspected.’
    • ‘Hypersensitivity responses play a major role in plant resistance to pathogens.’
    • ‘A healthier diet has also increased my resistance to colds.’
    • ‘Dietitians also recommend eating yogurt, which can help strengthen the body's resistance to infection.’
    • ‘She was given morphine and needed ventilation for her subsequent apnoea and to try to lower her pulmonary resistance to improve lung blood flow.’
    • ‘Sorry to bring up smoking again, but smoking reduces your resistance to bugs, lowers the body's ability to expel the mucus and lengthens recovery time.’
    • ‘This heat dries out the skin and lowers its resistance to the sun.’
    • ‘He'd leave the windows open in winter so we'd develop a resistance to cold.’
    • ‘Diabetes lowers your body's resistance to infections and slows your ability to heal.’
    • ‘They're naturally gifted with strong stomachs and a powerful resistance to viral and bacterial agents.’
    • ‘One of the many benefits of being 20 is the resistance to illness.’
    • ‘If your mouth is unhealthy, especially with gum disease, it overloads your health every moment of the day, lowering your resistance to all disease.’
    • ‘Most disease resistance traits are measured as one or more discrete characters.’
    • ‘The drugs used to prevent the body rejecting the new heart adversely weakened his resistance to infection.’
    • ‘Systemic vascular resistance is increased, especially in the muscle and skin.’
    1. 2.1Medicine Biology Lack of sensitivity to a drug, insecticide, etc., especially as a result of continued exposure or genetic change.
      • ‘Unfortunately, these numbers are on the rise due to insecticide resistance, antimalarial drug resistance, and environmental changes.’
      • ‘New antimicrobial agents are urgently needed to counter growing drug resistance.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, drug resistance will continue and vigilance is necessary.’
      • ‘In vitro drug susceptibility indicated resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampin.’
      • ‘Drug resistance arises by natural selection, mutant strains being selected when the virus replicates in sub-limiting drug concentrations.’
      ability to fight off, ability to counteract, ability to withstand, immunity from, defences against
      View synonyms
  • 3The impeding, slowing, or stopping effect exerted by one material thing on another.

    ‘air resistance would need to be reduced by streamlining’
    • ‘The speed reached by such a body depends on the ratio of the effort exerted to the resistance offered.’
    • ‘Engineers help cyclists battle drag - the wind resistance that impedes forward motion.’
    • ‘Initially they will accelerate, but they will soon reach a constant terminal velocity when the air resistance around them offsets their downward acceleration.’
    • ‘More subtle effects of air resistance on projectile motion are related to the shape and rotation of the object.’
    • ‘An individual insect was placed on the test material within a clear plastic canopy to eliminate effects of air resistance.’
  • 4The degree to which a substance or device opposes the passage of an electric current, causing energy dissipation. Ohm's law resistance (measured in ohms) is equal to the voltage divided by the current.

    • ‘Bolometers are devices whose electrical resistance changes with temperature.’
    • ‘Although he did not express it in these terms, it had also been deduced from Aristotle's Physics that the velocity of a body was proportional to the force acting on it divided by the resistance.’
    • ‘This means that the electrical resistance of the device can be changed dramatically using a very small magnetic field.’
    • ‘The voltage and/or resistance and thereby the temperature of each thermistor is measured at several second intervals.’
    • ‘Input resistance was measured as the voltage deflection induced by a - 0.5 or - 1.0 nA current pulse.’
    1. 4.1 A resistor or other circuit component which opposes the passage of an electric current.
      • ‘A resistance unit has a temperature fuse between a resistance and a terminal for deactivating a resistance circuit when the motor reaches the permissible maximum temperature.’
      • ‘The circuit only has an input voltage, a diode, and a resistance across the output.’
      • ‘Therefore, the insulation is stressed only in one direction, and the resistance and wire gauge remain largely unchanged.’
      • ‘Their wheelchair is a modification of the standard apparatus: the wheelchair is fitted with two motors, which are controlled by a panel based on light-dependent diodes and resistances.’

Phrases

  • the path (or line) of least resistance

    • An option avoiding difficulty or unpleasantness; the easiest course of action.

      • ‘Many bands with a conscience choose the path of least resistance: the charity record.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, most players will simply take the path of least resistance, and choose to do whatever is easier.’
      • ‘What really happens when you choose the path of least resistance?’
      • ‘Of course, there will be those who will choose the path of least resistance and remain silent on the matter.’
      • ‘However, victory and satisfaction belong to those who do not choose the path of least resistance when faced with major life challenges.’
      • ‘He'll likely take the path of least resistance, the one with the fewest ‘practical difficulties’’
      • ‘Instead of healthy eating, we choose the path of least resistance: convenience foods, snack food or even fast food.’
      • ‘Obviously they must carefully weigh their options; in some instances the path of least resistance is chosen.’
      • ‘But as I have nothing new to trade, I choose the path of least resistance.’
      • ‘Finally, when given the opportunity to effect change, many powerless people choose the path of least resistance.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from French résistance, from late Latin resistentia, from the verb resistere ‘hold back’ (see resist).

Pronunciation

resistance

/rəˈzistəns//rəˈzɪstəns/