Definition of reprint in English:

reprint

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
Pronunciation /rēˈprint/
  • Print again or in a different form.

    ‘the story has been reprinted at intervals ever since it first appeared’
    • ‘To mark his seventieth birthday, a series of Laurent de Brunhoff's classic stories have been reprinted this year in special hardback editions.’
    • ‘While her other books have gone out of print, Mythology has been reprinted many times.’
    • ‘In its newly reprinted edition, this text will remain a staple for the study of early music.’
    • ‘I also hope his book is reprinted, the next generation of graphic designer could learn from Rob Roy's knowledge of a forgotten art.’
    • ‘The book reached number one in Ireland and was reprinted three times in three weeks following its release last year.’
    • ‘Perrault's fables were much reprinted and adapted by the Victorians into children's picture books, burlesque, and pantomime.’
    • ‘An edited transcription is reprinted here, in two parts, with the author's generous permission.’
    • ‘This travesty of Richardson's novel became the most frequently reprinted edition of the early 19th century.’
    • ‘These photographs have seldom, if ever, been reprinted; they do not suit the new context.’
    • ‘His book The Bayeux Tapestry has just been reprinted by Thames and Hudson.’
    • ‘The following story is reprinted from Dakota Dirt, a newsletter published by South Dakota State University Soil Testing Lab.’
    • ‘The second and final installment of an edited transcription is reprinted here with the author's generous permission.’
    • ‘This poem and many others have been reprinted in anthologies and journals worldwide.’
    • ‘In fact half of its twenty-eight pieces are reprinted from that book.’
    • ‘The 25 articles were reprinted, 9 from book chapters and 16 from 10 different journals.’
    • ‘Her poetry, essays, and short fiction have appeared in many magazines and have been reprinted in the Pushcart and Best American Poetry anthologies.’
    • ‘It was reprinted by former LIFE editor Edward K. Thompson in his autobiography, along with the story behind it.’
    • ‘This article by Robert R. Reilly appears in the December edition of Crisis Magazine and is reprinted with kind permission of the author.’
    • ‘The book was taken off the shelves in England and wasn't reprinted in the US, though amended versions were later republished in both countries.’
    • ‘It was the beginning of a firm friendship, and we collaborated in a book that reprinted the narrative that Orr had written to go with his images.’
    set in print, send to press, run off, preprint, reprint, pull, proof, copy, reproduce
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noun

Pronunciation /ˈrēˌprint/
  • 1An act of printing more copies of a work.

    • ‘Apart from a reprint of The Home Place in 1968 and a second edition of The Inhabitants in 1972, both his landmark photo-texts were long out of print until 1999.’
    • ‘Most of the Fujifilm Aladdin and Kodak Picture Maker kiosks you'll find in stores were designed to make reprints from scanned-in photos.’
    • ‘A second edition appeared in 1881 and many reprints followed in this century, especially during the 1960s after the publication of William Styron's controversial novel The Confessions of Nat Turner.’
    • ‘Publishers normally order reprints of older titles when they suddenly become topical again like in the case of Afghanistan.’
    • ‘We'd publish reprints and vintage articles, a new article that had to do with a similar topic, and a technical, aesthetic, history or conservation article.’
    • ‘A reprint of a copy was published in 1965.’
    • ‘Several subsequent British reprints as well as editions by Le Clerc and Imbault in Paris and Roger in Amsterdam attest to their popularity in the 18th century.’
    • ‘Or do you tell your customer that you can fix her photo, have it enlarged, add some reprints for other relatives and give her an exquisite custom frame job?’
    print run, printing, imprinting, imprint, reprint, issue, edition, version, publication
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    1. 1.1 A copy of a book or other material that has been reprinted.
      • ‘Finally, should there be a reprint of this book, one can hope that the Press will take the trouble to weed out the endless proofreading errors that deface the present text.’
      • ‘Contrary to one of the expressed goals of the Landmark series, however, none of these is a reprint of an out-of-print book or hard-to-find journal article.’
      • ‘There are three new reprints of books on the Second World War.’
      • ‘This volume is an unabridged reprint of the original volume published in The Musicians Library Series by Oliver Ditson Company, Boston, in 1915.’
      • ‘The second Trollopian wave came crashing in with the paperback classic reprints series which were pioneered by the Penguin English Library (now Penguin Classics) in the late 1960s.’
      • ‘Finally, there is the 1972 Edinburgh Film Festival Booklet, edited by Jon Halliday and Laura Mulvey, which accompanied a retrospective of some twenty Sirk films and contains both reprints and new material.’
      • ‘The book also contains a reprint of a funny science fiction short story, ‘Roll Over Beethoven,’ written by Cooper and Larry S. Haverkos.’
      • ‘Dave and I are starting a new imprint, modestly called ‘The Collins Library,’ to do hardcover reprints of old, forgotten books.’
      • ‘This contains reprints of articles from books and periodicals by the editors, Douglas Gomery, Nicholas Garnham, Oscar H. Gandy Jr., and Robert W. McChesney.’
      • ‘This is the first reprint of the book since the 1790s and is well edited.’
      • ‘Prion is rapidly establishing a name for itself as one of the most important publisher of paperback reprints of titles that have become established as ‘classic’ texts.’
      • ‘To celebrate turning 15, Penguin promises an ‘Editor's Choice’ series of cheap reprints of books published abroad, by authors like Mario Vargas Llosa and Orhan Pamuk.’
      • ‘Hacker Art Books was once frequented by such artists as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Keening and has remained an important source for specialty art books, reprints and out-of-print titles.’
      • ‘I have discovered a few minor ones, but the biggest gaffe so far - a large chunk missing from Stravinsky's work list - has already been seen to, and purchasers of the books will receive a reprint of the full list.’
      • ‘Their books have received great recognition, meriting several reprints and earning numerous literary awards.’
      • ‘In fact, the Premchand volume does not even bother to name an editor; it contains simply a reprint of four books of translations of Premchand by three different translators published over the last decade or two.’
      • ‘It sold out after six months of being widely available, but a paperback reprint is being prepared for the spring by I.B. Tauris.’
      • ‘This new edition in four volumes, a reprint of the 1962 paperback edition, costs [pounds sterling] 9.99 per volume.’
      • ‘In most cases they did not even mention that these are not new books - merely reprints of editions available for a long time.’
      • ‘This book, a reprint of a collection first published in 1960, is intended to shed some light on this neglected phase of Yeats's life.’
      print, copy, reprint, duplicate, replica, facsimile, carbon copy
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    2. 1.2 An offprint.

Pronunciation

reprint

Verb/rēˈprint/

reprint

Noun/ˈrēˌprint/