Definition of repass in English:

repass

verb

  • 1Pass again, especially on the way back.

    • ‘Schumacher damaged his front wing trying to repass while Fisichella crashed out altogether soon after.’
    • ‘One of the most common modern examples is obstruction of the highway over which all members of the public have a right to pass and repass.’
    • ‘The Commisioners could not avoid the requirements in relation to public roads by calling them private roads and granting rights to everyone to "pass and repass" on them.’
    • ‘These five varieties, with many intermediate ones, pass and repass into each other.’
    • ‘But the efforts to advance allowed Steward to close and repass, before he clashed with Seager and gave Luck 10th.’
    • ‘That means that one aircraft may pass and repass on more than one occasion.’
    • ‘The grant of a right to "pass and repass" does not per se include a right to park.’
    • ‘Just modify your circuits and make them like Hockenheim, where people pass and repass.’
    • ‘Although Josh was able to repass Mawer for the third place he had lost while avoiding the wayward Senna, Fisher ran out of time to catch Duran for second.’
    • ‘This was because they had lately been enlarging the canal at this place, to make more room for the boats to pass and repass.’
    • ‘As friends and acquaintances pass and repass they pelt one another with missiles of flowers.’
    • ‘I had a very good start and overtook Massa but unfortunately he was able to repass me at Becketts.’
    • ‘The only right to use the highway which the court was prepared to recognise was to pass and repass, and matters incidental to this.’
  • 2with object Pass (legislation) in an amended form or under changed conditions.

    ‘Congress repassed the statute with the added interstate commerce clause’
    • ‘"The House wants to repass this energy bill for one reason alone: to put the bogey on Senate Democrats," Wicker told Muckraker.’
    • ‘He was required to report the cancellation to Congress, which then could repass the provision as ordinary legislation under expedited procedures.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French repasser.

Pronunciation

repass

/ˌrēˈpas/