Main definitions of repair in English

: repair1repair2

repair1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Fix or mend (a thing suffering from damage or a fault)

    ‘faulty electrical appliances should be repaired by an electrician’
    • ‘Cast iron can also be repaired, though it is difficult to mend a break with any strength.’
    • ‘Readers have told of cases where they paid a mechanic up to €100 to service a car and repair any problems before it underwent its test.’
    • ‘These early measures appear to have been ineffective, although following the reissue of the ruling in 1444, over two hundred properties pinpointed for restoration were repaired.’
    • ‘Led by the local district council and part-funded by the Energy Saving Trust, the 10 mill owners are installing new turbines, restoring blocked leats and repairing sluice gates.’
    • ‘The restoration team has repaired over 80 percent of the roofs since the cease-fire in 1992.’
    • ‘The most basic one is selling services to other players, such as repairing their ships or storing items for them.’
    • ‘Founded in 2000, the company, based in South Bend, Ind., specializes in making, servicing, and repairing industrial magnets and electric motors of all sizes.’
    • ‘Robert Lowell's famous poem ‘Mending Wall ‘evokes the quotidian pleasure of repairing a wall.’’
    • ‘Back in South Africa, Van der Merwe insisted Delta replace the vehicle or repair the damage.’
    • ‘In the next story, an elderly woman repairs a toy robot collection in the hopes of connecting with her comatose son.’
    • ‘His union also agreed to let the airline outsource more jobs, and Miah is worried that his post - he's one of 10 who repair ovens for onboard food service - could be among them.’
    • ‘Companies try to protect their margins by selling additional services which consumers do not necessarily need, such as selling an insurance policy to cover the cost of repairing a faulty item.’
    • ‘Other points to consider are whether the book been repaired, restored or rebacked.’
    • ‘The restoration project involved repairing the roof, columns, and finishes; conservation of the art murals; and improving accessibility.’
    • ‘Not only has the artist supplied the missing left hand, but he has also repaired the worn places on the other thumb and the forward heel.’
    • ‘There should be hardline regulations for all tradesmen, whether repairing cars, building houses, plumbing or whatever.’
    • ‘On arrival in a village he would ingratiate himself with the locals to find out if anyone owned a violin, or he might visit monasteries and other likely prospects, offering to repair their instruments.’
    • ‘Local prosperity has allowed the old texture of Dujiangyan to be restored and repaired, and one of the new interventions is an urban park which, appropriately, celebrates water.’
    • ‘The fireplaces and windows were restored, wood floors repaired or replaced, and new copper flashing installed on the original slate roof.’
    • ‘Its side elevations were retained and repaired, but all floors and cross walls were removed, though the roof and its steel trusses was repaired and restored.’
    mend, fix, fix up, put right, set right, restore, restore to working order, make as good as new, patch up, put back together, overhaul, service, renovate, recondition, rehabilitate, rebuild, reconstruct, refit, adjust, regulate
    mend, darn, sew up, stitch up, patch up
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Make good (such damage) by fixing or repairing it.
      ‘an operation to repair damage to his neck’
      • ‘In fact, early diagnosis of Alzheimer's is the only hope for most victims because by the time the dementia that accompanies this dire disease appears, the brain is usually too damaged to repair.’
      • ‘Leaping at this golden opportunity, Frankenstein repairs Christina's scars, brings her back to life and puts Hans' soul in the young girls body.’
      • ‘Though partial recovery has begun, it is likely to take many years for these damaged national economies to repair their losses.’
      • ‘Bone remodeling, which repairs damaged bone, is a sequential process in which bone resorption precedes bone formation.’
      • ‘Aerospace firms use them to create filters for fuel cells, for example, while biotech firms use them to repair human tissue damage.’
      • ‘The course will run over six weeks in May and June and will teach people to upgrade and repair computers and configure their operating systems.’
      • ‘Today much of the visible damage has been repaired, but the strain on the economy has been huge.’
      • ‘Mission-critical storage systems demand the ability to perform repairs without interrupting operations.’
      • ‘Anecdotal evidence suggests that managers are increasingly spending time repairing social relations damaged by hasty, ill-considered and intemperate electronic communications.’
      • ‘Back in 1974, when Dr. Frank W. Jobe dreamed up the operation to fix John's elbow, the idea of repairing the arm of a high school player would have been ridiculed.’
      • ‘Or consider a relatively expensive strategy, and sign up for specialized insurance that will replace lost or stolen items and repair damaged ones.’
      • ‘At the same time, the defenders will be scrambling to activate defensive turrets, repairing damaged facilities and keeping supply lines open, all while defending the primary objective.’
      • ‘It dispatches the hormones and chemicals that repair damaged cells and replace dead ones.’
      • ‘To repair any damage Rhoda has done to her already precarious identity as a good little girl, Rhoda initiates a game that she and her mother have obviously played before.’
      • ‘A pharmaceutical company approaches the parents and has a new drug that has a 75% chance of repairing the little boy's gene.’
      • ‘I have to operate the machinery to understand how to repair it.’
      • ‘The most immediate reason you'll need money, aside from repairing any damage your cars might sustain, is to purchase new machines or additional parts that you can use to tune your vehicles further.’
      • ‘If the damages can be repaired at minimal cost, you can pay for the repairs directly.’
      • ‘The government has already started repairing the badly damaged train line, an undertaking estimated to cost more than NT $270 million.’
      • ‘Many parents opt to pay for their children's protruding or crowded teeth to be repaired privately, rather than risk damaging a child's self-esteem due to bullying or exclusion by their peers.’
      rectify, make good, put right, correct, right, redress, make up for, make amends for, make reparation for, compensate for
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Put right (a damaged relationship or unwelcome situation)
      ‘the new government moved quickly to repair relations with the USA’
      • ‘Birthday celebrations are useful opportunities to repair these kind of gaps, to explore neglected corners, or even to reconsider the familiar.’
      • ‘Regrettably, the public was less interested in the complexities of ethics regulation than, understandably, in attempting to repair the damage done by fraud.’
      • ‘Identity Protection Service, which gives advice on the prevention and detection of identify theft, together with help to resolve the problem and repair the credit status of victims.’
      • ‘While Paris and Berlin are eager to repair frayed transatlantic relations, the Europeans do not want to be dictated to by Washington.’
      • ‘In part, these films are the result of an effort by the French liberal intelligentsia to repair the rift with organized labor that occurred in the aftermath of the failure of 1968.’
      • ‘Fiorina's solid fourth quarter certainly helped the process of repairing relations with investors.’
      • ‘Although the government says it won't bail out the company, it has done precious little to repair the situation apart from sacking Subramanyam.’
      • ‘Since so many of his songs are about repairing broken relationships and settling down, it surprised many fans when heleft his wife and moved to Spain.’
      • ‘The good will of people from everywhere sustains us as we rebuild our City and repair our spirits.’
      • ‘The legacy of broken economic and financial relations can take many years to repair and re-establish.’
      • ‘The deal helped Sotheby's repair its balance sheet, which had been dented badly by the fines and settlements after its price-fixing case.’
      • ‘‘I hope relations between our two countries will be repaired as soon as possible and that our two cities will have a chance to discuss exchanges,’ he added.’
      • ‘Ford and his new executive team have already begun the healing process through a back-to-basics strategy which includes repairing relations with dealers and smoothing feathers ruffled by Nasser.’
      • ‘What I have discovered is that the only way to listen to it is at concert hall volume - (I'll repair relations with my neighbours later).’
      • ‘September 11 traumatized our collective consciousness, and repairing the city is a way of healing ourselves.’
      • ‘This is a sign that improving financial conditions are helping corporations to repair their balance sheets.’
      • ‘So far, Bill Ford has put his name to good use by repairing relations with employees and dealers.’
      • ‘A change in the papacy following the death of Pope John Paul II is unlikely to repair the strained relations between the Vatican and China in the near future, Catholic academics said Friday.’
      • ‘How easily and quickly can the system be repaired?’
      • ‘They spent a long time repairing relations with Saudi Arabia and wouldn't therefore be involved, it seems to me, in an operation of bombings in Saudi Arabia.’
      put right, set right, put to rights, patch up, mend, fix, sort out, straighten out, make better, improve, right, heal, cure, remedy, retrieve
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1The action of fixing or mending something.

    ‘the truck was beyond repair’
    ‘the abandoned house they bought needs repairs’
    • ‘Charlie and Louis take off after him and, after a narrow miss, crash the jeep beyond repair.’
    • ‘To make matters worse, the call for repair and rebuilding has exacerbated the prehurricane shortage of cement, lumber, and steel.’
    • ‘While the lands also house the ruins of an earlier castle, previously home to the Blakes, one of the 14 ‘tribes’ of Galway, this structure is beyond repair.’
    • ‘The room seems trashed beyond repair, while light spills through the casement windows beyond which green things are growing.’
    • ‘Some people called with pianos beyond repair, and we politely had to refuse them.’
    • ‘He says that Ulster Protestantism may be split beyond repair and that this fragmentation poses a real threat to the Union.’
    • ‘The minister has reduced the specified rate on loans from employers to finance the purchase, repair or improvement of the principal home, from 6 per cent to 4 per cent.’
    • ‘Almost every single building is destroyed or damaged beyond repair.’
    • ‘In other words, if Spitzer sinks one or two major health insurers, the entire U.S. health care system could take a major hit, and may possibly be pushed beyond repair, at least for several years.’
    • ‘The rezoning application states that no refueling, repair or sewage pump-out services are permitted.’
    • ‘On a loan used for the purchase, repair, development or improvement of your main residence.’
    • ‘After hearing some fits and starts, we realized that the tape was chewed beyond repair.’
    • ‘Under the terms of the budget, interest on borrowed money used for the purchase, improvement or repair of rented residential property could once again be written off as a deductible expense against rental income.’
    • ‘Museum spokespersons, however, maintain that the instruments were in poor condition and most were beyond repair before they became part of Parker's artwork.’
    • ‘City officials say that the work has deteriorated beyond repair because of faulty design and must be removed.’
    • ‘It became the climax of the film, their marriage clearly beyond repair.’
    • ‘The three-year RAC membership includes roadside assistance, servicing and repair.’
    • ‘You get tax relief on the interest paid on a loan used for the purchase, repair or improvement of a sole or main residence.’
    • ‘Vendors offered services such as knife sharpening, cigarette lighter repair, and bike inner-tube patching from makeshift, cloth-covered wooden crates.’
    • ‘Oil spills, petrochemical pollution, DDT, and toxic defoliants have rendered this appendix on the Caspian Sea's air, soil, and water almost beyond repair.’
    restoration, fixing, fixing up, renovation, rebuilding, reconstruction
    irreparable, irreversible, past mending, irretrievable, hopeless, past hope, beyond hope, irremediable, irrecoverable, incurable, beyond cure
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A result of fixing or mending.
      ‘a coat of French polish was brushed over the repair’
      • ‘There is a robust replacement market or aftermarket, involving turbine repairs or rebuilding (not included in our discussion).’
      • ‘Ajinomoto claims the drink not only rehydrates users after exercise but also repairs muscle mass.’
      • ‘This assumes that there are no other offsettable expenses, such as repairs, repainting and so on.’
      • ‘The growth in guerrilla attack frequency and effectiveness slows down repairs, training, and population support.’
      • ‘Admissions to Bantry House are not subject to Vat and the maintenance, which includes staff wages and repairs, can be offset against tax.’
      • ‘Railway service on the 29.7 kilometer-long Jiji Line resumed in January last year also following extensive repairs of collapsed tunnels, damaged track and bridges.’
      • ‘Also remember that you can offset expenses incurred on the rented property such as repairs, maintenance, insurance, wear and tear of furniture but not mortgage interest against rental income.’
      • ‘The Bismarck too suffered damage, mainly to its fuel tanks, and it headed to a port in France to effect repairs.’
      • ‘Money spent on insurance, cleaning, repairs and general maintenance can also be offset against the rental income.’
      • ‘Advisers say they give a cushion to investors who may be cash-strapped at the beginning and may want the money to effect repairs on/or upgrade the property.’
      • ‘The dealer ended up doing £250 worth of work to replace a bit of wire that cost them about 10p because they had to take out the entire loom to effect the repair.’
      • ‘The gold background is original, and although worm damage has resulted in repairs around the left and right edges and in the upper right-hand corner, the gilding is generally well preserved.’
    2. 1.2 The relative physical condition of an object.
      ‘the existing hospital is in a bad state of repair’
      • ‘Russia's submarines are in such a poor state of repair that they seldom venture far from port, the Kursk disaster reinforcing fears about the reliability of the Russian fleet.’
      • ‘Never use it in the wet and keep it in good repair.’
      • ‘Studies suggest that an inadequate supply of methyl donors in the diet leads to problems with DNA repair and stability, which has obvious implications for cancer and aging.’
      • ‘The agent reports that the building, which is for sale by private treaty, is in a good state of repair and is available for immediate occupation.’
      • ‘Whether particular masks are performed at all depends as well on costumes being in good repair, sufficient resources for refurbishing, and the availability of a dancer.’
      • ‘The premises must also be provided and maintained in a reasonable state of repair.’
      • ‘The swimming pool edge remains constant from frame to frame, while the view changes from ocean waves to stands of trees, from an abandoned, rundown pool to another, in good repair.’
      • ‘It's very important to keep hoe tips in good repair as they lose their effectiveness quickly with very little wear.’
      • ‘By having all of the information up front, potential buyers can quickly assess the condition and state of repair of the house without having to engage their own surveyor.’
      • ‘This includes pipelines that have been blown up in recent months as well as production facilities that are in desperate need of repair.’
      • ‘Next door was a Roman Catholic church in good repair.’
      • ‘We don't need the most expensive new paint on the block, but we do need reliable access to certain essential pieces in good repair and adjustment.’
      • ‘Generally, the landlord is required to keep the structure and exterior of the property in good repair and he may also have to insure the dwelling against fire.’
      • ‘There are four goodsized bedrooms, all of which have built-in wardrobes and original picture rails and are generally in good repair.’
      • ‘Usually, letting agreements provide that the tenant allows the landlord or his agent at all reasonable times to re-enter the premises to examine its condition and state of repair.’
      • ‘Check that the fence and gate are in good repair.’
      • ‘And just as one's friendships need to be kept in good repair, customer relationships can be maintained only through consistency.’
      • ‘Even though a facility may be structurally sound and in good repair, it may have severe functional obsolescence that discounts its usability and hence its rental potential and value.’
      • ‘It is important that planting equipment is in good repair.’
      • ‘The original floorboards are in a good state of repair and could easily be restored to their former glory with a coat of varnish.’
      condition, working order, state, shape, form, fettle
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French reparer, from Latin reparare, from re- ‘back’ + parare ‘make ready’.

Pronunciation

repair

/rəˈpɛr//rəˈper/

Main definitions of repair in English

: repair1repair2

repair2

verb

[NO OBJECT]repair to
humorous, formal
  • Go to (a place), especially in company.

    ‘we repaired to the tranquility of a nearby cafe’
    • ‘Dolly complained loudly, Harry curled up and went to sleep and, instead of repairing to my desk and getting on with my work, I took a short restorative nap.’
    • ‘After their divorce is finalised, they repair to a cheap hotel room for what is evidently a pre-arranged valedictory sex session.’
    • ‘On Sunday mid-morning after Mass, my foreign teacher friends and I repair to a nearby MacDonalds fastfood restaurant and spend as per usual an unhurried time drinking coffee and swapping campus protest stories.’
    • ‘I did mix it up in those three weeks, though: the occasional sojourn in a hostel, then repairing to a restaurant with actual tablecloths for a meal with the parents.’
    • ‘After the meal, while the others lounged on the grass, Peebles and Mailey repaired to the edge of the lawn.’
    • ‘A hostess with regal posture matching her salon, Manette served porto, then we repaired to the dining room for couscous.’
    • ‘Most of them prefer three bottles of wine over the course of a large lunch, before repairing to the chamber for a snooze.’
    • ‘What kind of maniac, moreover, would deliberately ignite 20 pounds of explosives without first clearing the area by several city blocks at least (or in my case, repairing to our finished basement a block away)?’
    • ‘After a leisurely tour of the cathedral, we repaired to one of the bistros that line the stone pavement around the church, to have a bite of lunch.’
    • ‘After these all-afternoon discussions over tea, the group repaired to a good Georgetown restaurant to continue talking and to socialize over dinner.’
    • ‘He suffered from tuberculosis, and, as his health began to fail, he made a last effort at a cure by giving up painting and repairing to his brother's property at Pomona for the pure mountain air.’
    • ‘Before repairing to a local hostelry for beer, cosmopolitans, odd conversation about the noise cotton wool makes and other such essential trivia.’
    • ‘At one point everyone repairs to a tawdry nightclub where Marianne is discovered posing naked by the father who has disowned her.’
    • ‘The dinner ruined, Colonel Everson and the wizard repaired to the smoking-room to light their calming pipes.’
    • ‘The spell is broken when we repair to his house to discover a middle-aged lady struggling with some shopping bags in the driveway.’
    • ‘Afterwards we repaired to the travellers bungalow.’
    • ‘After church some Western teacher mends and I from different institutions repair to a nearby fast food restaurant for coffee and snacks, as is our Sunday morning custom.’
    • ‘My money was already paid up, so for the next nine Monday lunch-hours I repaired to the adjoining golf course.’
    • ‘Over head I could hear the builders doing their best to work through all but the worst of it, repairing to the shelter of the garage when it got too bad.’
    go to, adjourn to, head for, wend one's way to
    View synonyms

noun

archaic
  • 1Frequent or habitual visiting of a place.

    ‘she exhorted repair to the church’
    1. 1.1 A place which is frequently visited or occupied.
      ‘the repairs of wild beasts’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French repairer, from late Latin repatriare ‘return to one's country’ (see repatriate).

Pronunciation

repair

/rəˈpɛr//rəˈper/