Main definitions of rent in English

: rent1rent2rent3

rent1

noun

  • 1A tenant's regular payment to a landlord for the use of property or land.

    • ‘Prime retail rents have soared over the past decade, but margins have not kept pace.’
    • ‘Currently the average monthly rent for two-bedroom apartments in prime Dublin locations is €1,400 per month.’
    • ‘In 1997, a change in the law meant it became easier for landlords to evict tenants who weren't paying their rent.’
    • ‘No matter how much legal protection you have in place, though, you still must have conscientious tenants paying reasonable rents to come out ahead as a landlord.’
    • ‘The oversupply of rental property has resulted in landlords cutting rents to attract tenants.’
    • ‘There are lots of random tourist shops - and empty ones because owners can't afford the high rents.’
    • ‘As a council tenant she pays no rent or council tax and she gets all the extra benefits there are.’
    • ‘Residents had traditionally signed long leases and paid an annual rent to the landowner.’
    • ‘They asked for two years' rent in advance.’
    • ‘Smith said the rise in interest rates is likely to increase the popularity of residential investment properties which offer guaranteed rents to landlords.’
    • ‘All four facilities are paying relatively low annual rents to the council.’
    • ‘Can I sell the appliances to cover the unpaid rent?’
    • ‘How can landlords be allowed to harass tenants who pay their rent, just because they have other plans for the property?’
    • ‘Rather than charge monthly rent, most landlords used to require tenants to put up huge cash deposits, often hundreds of thousands of dollars.’
    • ‘Breach of the tenant's obligation to pay rent gives the landlord certain rights, including the right of forfeiture.’
    • ‘This will give rise to increased tenant demand and rising rents in office, retail and residential properties.’
    • ‘You should definitely talk to your landlord about reducing your rent.’
    • ‘Your brother allowed your mother to reside there and most likely did not charge her rent.’
    • ‘A tenant paying rent to a non-resident landlord must deduct standard rate income tax from the rent paid to the landlord and pay the tax he has deducted to the Revenue.’
    • ‘If David pays rent and his income and savings are sufficiently low he may get housing benefit; if he pays council tax he may get council tax benefit.’
    hire charge, rental
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A sum paid for the hire of equipment.
      • ‘From Nevada, tourist buses and cars can be hired on rent.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Pay someone for the use of (something, typically property, land, or a car)

    ‘they rented a house together in Spain’
    ‘a rented apartment’
    • ‘Hip-hop fans should at least rent it just for the musical aspect of the film.’
    • ‘Another important driving tip that should always be kept in mind, especially if you are renting a car in Kauai, is to always keep your seatbelt fastened no matter where you are seated in the car.’
    • ‘The group then rented a house from a private landlord.’
    • ‘If you're traveling by plane in the coming months, chances are you'll be renting a car when you land.’
    • ‘Did anyone want to wear the gorilla suit rented for the occasion?’
    • ‘The demand for privately rented accommodation has increased, but the choice of properties available can be limited.’
    • ‘He did not own the car and was not the person who rented the car.’
    • ‘In Howth, he rented a four-bedroom detached property for €4,440 last year.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, privately rented accommodation is becoming very expensive.’
    • ‘The landlady lived on the top floor of the three story house and a few other people rented the other small apartments.’
    • ‘For now, I've voluntarily dismounted from the property ladder and am renting a nice family home while I see how the economy and the housing market develop.’
    • ‘Of course we didn't own a house we just rented a two room apartment.’
    • ‘We landed in Las Vegas; Edward rented a car and we headed toward the mountains.’
    • ‘The castle can also be rented for special occasions on a weekend or weekly basis.’
    • ‘Agents use this information to assess a person's rental history when considering an application to rent a property.’
    • ‘If you haven't seen the film you need to at least rent it.’
    • ‘My advice would be to rent it first before you put down your money.’
    • ‘You can either rent a car or motorbike or go on an organised trip by jeep or minibus.’
    • ‘Here she rents a small upstairs apartment in a family's house, and paints.’
    • ‘But it's unlikely that Americans living in a foreign land are renting many of these units.’
    hire, lease, charter
    occupy temporarily, live in temporarily
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of an owner) let someone use (something) in return for payment.
      ‘he purchased a large tract of land and rented out most of it to local farmers’
      • ‘His land was rented out and the money never stopped flowing into his house.’
      • ‘The real owners of the software can restrict you or stores and not allow anyone to rent it to others.’
      • ‘The bulk of the owners have rented their properties out, while five sold them on at a 10 to 20 per cent profit.’
      • ‘Investors buying with a view to renting a property often buy four or five apartments.’
      • ‘Landlords would then be given training in renting to tenants to keep the properties available.’
      • ‘He didn't get it - neither did I - but the price he bid would have given him a better return than he could have gotten by renting the place out.’
      • ‘The recreation department also plans to rent the equipment out to groups around town.’
      • ‘Although I paid for three months to keep the owner from renting it while we're at England, I don't feel comfortable with this.’
      • ‘For the remaining three months, owners can either rent the property out or use it themselves.’
      • ‘Many home owners with hefty mortgages rent a room in their properties to help pay the bills - as they can earn up to €7,618 tax-free per annum.’
      • ‘He recognized that if land were rented out by the state, the effect would be the same as if a single tax applied.’
      • ‘Rogue landlords have been renting out student houses in Lismore Park and Lismore Lawn as holiday homes to unsuspecting tourists.’
      • ‘Under the terms of her admission to the United Kingdom, she is not allowed to rent space in her room to anyone else or to engage in paid employment for at least six months.’
      • ‘I support the concept of home owners renting rooms to one or two students.’
      • ‘His British landlord rents out two rooms to four immigrants, while simultaneously claiming benefit for the property.’
      • ‘It is now rented out and has its own separate entrance.’
      • ‘The owners rented it out for the summers, and it looked like our summer neighbors were here early.’
      • ‘But why not just rent the room out to a lodger?’
      let, let out, lease, lease out, hire, hire out
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2North American no object Be let or hired out at a specified rate.
      ‘skis or snowboards rent for $60–80 for six days’
      • ‘But there are new ways to think about tools - tools that only a group with a pool of money can purchase, rent, or lease.’
      • ‘The agent expects two-bedroom units in the development to rent for around €1,000 per month.’
      • ‘He was also told that the space would be renting for $7,500 per month, a sum that is roughly triple the amount of rent that nearby businesses are currently paying.’
      • ‘Apartments in these sought-after areas can rent for £1,445 to £1,566 per month to international clients.’
      • ‘Industrial units rent for between £37.60 and £59 per square metre depending on the size and standard of finish involved.’
      • ‘Properties in prime locations can rent for up to €800 a week during peak season, but few buy solely for investment.’
      • ‘The house is in excellent condition and would rent for at least $150 pw.’
      • ‘The robot I have in mind will rent for about $600 per month, or about $1 per hour.’
      • ‘The selling agents estimate that this type of unit would rent for around €1,015 per month.’
      • ‘He added that a typical two bedroom apartment will rent for up to €750 per month.’
      • ‘Peter shows the plans for the Cortlandt Homes to Ellsworth; they will rent for ten dollars per unit.’
      • ‘Most wedding sized systems rent for anywhere from $250 to $500 dollars per day.’

Phrases

  • for rent

    • Available to be rented.

      • ‘Who said one could find actual houses for rent to westerners for under 200,000 in central Tokyo?’
      • ‘The Custom House Studios in Westport currently has a studio for rent for the long term.’
      • ‘This, of course, means you have to pay to enter and the tranquil area has a definite touristy feel with kayaks and other water toys for rent.’
      • ‘There is but one hotel on the island and only a handful of private villas and apartments for rent.’
      • ‘Landlords argue this would result in either fewer properties for rent, or higher rents at all levels of the rental market to offset the risk posed by troublesome tenants.’
      • ‘Army and police guns go missing at intervals to be added to the stock of illegal weapons making the rounds - there is said to be a readily available supply of guns for rent.’
      • ‘With cabins, unlike condos or houses for rent, there are packages that accommodate specific recreational activities.’
      • ‘He had enough to get them a taxi at least and having spoken to the landlady earlier, she had told him there was an extra room on the second floor for rent.’
      • ‘However, most Florida villas that are for rent in the Orlando area come with their own private swimming pools and often Jacuzzis as well.’
      • ‘There are condos for rent on the island as well as houses priced to fit any budget.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French rente, from a root shared by render.

Pronunciation

rent

/rent//rɛnt/

Main definitions of rent in English

: rent1rent2rent3

rent2

noun

  • 1A large tear in a piece of fabric.

    • ‘They trailed in limp defeat, their once proud banners torn from the bosom of the sky, and bedecked with many minute rents and holes within their pale canvass.’
    • ‘Thus did ceremonies and their successful conduct knit up the repeated homicidal rents in the social fabric.’
    • ‘The least rent or puncture might, if not immediately checked and repaired, split the whole garment asunder and expose its wearer in all his human vulnerability.’
    • ‘He walked the edge of a yawning hole tearing a rent across the earth.’
    rip, tear, split, hole, gash, slash, slit, opening, perforation
    gorge, chasm, fault, rift, fissure, crevasse
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An opening or gap resembling a tear in a piece of fabric.
      ‘they stared at the rents in the clouds’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from obsolete rent ‘pull to pieces, lacerate’, variant of rend.

Pronunciation

rent

/rent//rɛnt/

Main definitions of rent in English

: rent1rent2rent3

rent3

  • past and past participle of rend

Pronunciation

rent

/rent//rɛnt/