Definition of remoteness in US English:

remoteness

noun

  • 1The state of being distant from something else, in particular from the main centers of population.

    ‘the remoteness of the location hindered development’
    • ‘Due to the remoteness of Siula Grande, there would be no way to arrange a rescue.’
    • ‘Moreover, the region's remoteness kept access to outside markets costly.’
    • ‘Despite this link to the mainland, the island's tranquility and remoteness are totally preserved.’
    • ‘Yet the sense of space, of distance, the remoteness of the places through which one travelled never contained a hint of menace.’
    • ‘The cries of circling gulls add to the eerie sense of remoteness.’
    • ‘Given its remoteness from urban distractions, the Burren College of Art needs a high level of maturity in students.’
    • ‘He said most rental cars do not last for a long time given the remoteness of some of the places the tourists take them.’
    • ‘What strikes the traveller is the Taiga's utter remoteness.’
    • ‘The stunning cinematography captures the beauty and remoteness of this mountain retreat.’
    • ‘Join us to experience the wilderness, wildlife, and remoteness of the High Arctic.’
  • 2Lack of connection with or relationship to something.

    ‘the remoteness of politics from everyday life’
    • ‘The emptiness of their canvases "proclaimed their remoteness from consumer culture and the world of things".’
    • ‘The atmosphere is complimented by the superb production design - a sleek, minimalist vision that accentuates the feeling of alienation, displacement and remoteness in this Kubrickian near-future.’
    • ‘The dancers are succeeded by a second threesome and then a third, all perpetuating the atmosphere of remoteness and nonengagement.’
    • ‘She wrote: "To possess the world in the form of images is, precisely, to reexperience the unreality and remoteness of the real".’
    • ‘The art installation suggests the continuity and fragility of Mediterranean civilization, reminding us of the simultaneous remoteness and seamlessness of the past.’
    • ‘My poetry rejects all excessive remoteness from reality and takes pleasure in bringing things and men closer in an effort to achieve universal coherence and harmony.’
    • ‘In this semi-autobiography, Simon experiences the remoteness and instability of growing up on a reservation.’
    • ‘Yet the remoteness of Finland from Putinist Russia is neither geographic nor strategic.’
    • ‘The curators have taken away some of the remoteness of medieval art by showing their objects thematically.’
    • ‘The market is also somewhere for farmers to network and to dispel feelings of remoteness that they may be experiencing whilst living with their families often in isolated areas.’
  • 3The state of being unlikely to occur.

    ‘the remoteness of a solution’
    • ‘The difficulty of such an approach, the remoteness of its potential use, and its probable cost should be considered.’
    • ‘Problems of remoteness may arise where the risk he contemplates is highly improbable.’
    • ‘Despite its remoteness, this risk is untenable.’
    • ‘There are no specific provisions in the Animals Act 1971 dealing with the question of remoteness of damage.’
    • ‘To address this problem of perceived remoteness of risk, the study emphasized the more immediate effects of unprotected sun exposure: wrinkled, sagging, dry skin.’
    • ‘The seriousness of the wrongdoing involved in such offences must be assessed by reference to the interests affected, the remoteness of the harm from the conduct, and culpability.’
    • ‘Those saddened by the remoteness of peace in South Asia or the Middle East may be helped by a fourth Hindu concept, that of action without a focus on its fruits.’
    • ‘It is probably the very remoteness of a solution as well as the decline in terrorist attacks of the past few years that have allowed this movement to coalesce.’
    • ‘The degree of probability of the risk materialising and not remoteness was extremely high.’
    • ‘There is a wider, non-legal sensibility through which people identify injury by adhering to physical symptoms, to familiar relationships, to the remoteness or proximity of harm.’
  • 4The quality of being aloof and unfriendly.

    ‘his diffidence could sometimes be misread as remoteness’
    • ‘Slowly she becomes aware of his apathy and remoteness regarding their family.’
    • ‘He takes every opportunity to highlight the negative aspects of city life and comment on the remoteness of urban dwellers.’
    • ‘She remembered a remoteness in her stepfather; she saw in him the figure of a man conflicted about involving himself emotionally in the activities of his children.’
    • ‘Many a woman has experienced a lover's ardor giving way to chilling remoteness once she has given herself to him sexually.’
    • ‘Her brother's increasing remoteness is the result of learned behavior and thought in white America.’
    • ‘The plane is a metaphor for his remoteness, his aloneness, his posture as an observer, an outsider.’
    • ‘He detects her unhappiness and remoteness and intuits that all is not well at home.’
    • ‘The entire movie consists of the pair trying to connect, with Christine's skewed vision of the world getting in the way as much as Richard's remoteness.’
    • ‘He had a certain remoteness, even pomposity.’
    • ‘If absence and remoteness do not destroy friendship, they attenuate or exhaust it, they enervate it.’

Pronunciation

remoteness

/rəˈmoʊtnəs//rəˈmōtnəs/