Definition of remote in US English:

remote

adjective

  • 1(of a place) situated far from the main centers of population; distant.

    ‘a remote Oregon valley’
    ‘I'd chosen a spot that looked as remote from any road as possible’
    • ‘Not only that, but if you live in remote places, gifts are often best organised by mail order from down south, which adds another week or two to the process.’
    • ‘Similarly, several families have moved closer to urban centres from the remote villages.’
    • ‘The aircraft will remain for an indefinite period, delivering supplies to more remote locations.’
    • ‘This problem centres on our very large landmass, long coastline, remote location and small population.’
    • ‘Officials generally tolerated prostitution in mining centres, especially in more remote locations.’
    • ‘Invitees used a satellite-based interactive system to link up with participants in locations situated in remote locations.’
    • ‘Christian churches exist in even the most remote villages.’
    • ‘Well, it's a fairly remote island.’
    • ‘Originating from Lucknow, the fruit is gradually establishing itself in certain pockets of Dindigul and in remote places in Salem.’
    • ‘Tired of the rat race of modern life, they found a deserted valley in a remote region of the world.’
    • ‘And many of those areas are very remote, very dangerous areas.’
    • ‘So if you want to go in the remote areas inside the valley, you don't have any options.’
    • ‘In Scotland too, holy wells in remote places attracted the attentions of Presbyterian devotees, often despite the baleful stares of ordained Kirk ministers.’
    • ‘They too had been forcibly removed to ‘detention’ centres in mostly remote areas.’
    • ‘Diseases continue to ravage large populations, especially in remote areas.’
    • ‘Moreover, since anthropology started as a museum discipline, this has resulted in a focus on exotic and remote locales and populations.’
    • ‘The facts are that since 1981, the Aboriginal population in remote areas has grown by more than 20 per cent.’
    • ‘He was faintly embarrassed by this and explained that living in a remote place demanded extraordinary measures if he was to keep up with the baseball.’
    • ‘The Himalayan Cataract Project is curing blindness - literally overnight - in the most remote villages of Nepal and India.’
    • ‘Every Croatian household, from the largest urban center to the most remote village, has a television.’
    faraway, distant, far, far off, far removed
    isolated, out of the way, outlying, off the beaten track, secluded, in the depths of …, hard to find, lonely, in the back of beyond, in the hinterlands, off the map, in the middle of nowhere, godforsaken, obscure, inaccessible, cut-off, unreachable
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of an electronic device) operating or operated by means of radio or infrared signals.
      • ‘The concept of the device is to activate a remote sensor that will trigger the device on the vehicle that will bring it to a stop.’
      • ‘The researchers had already deployed time-lapse cameras mounted to trees and remote microphones to listen for the telltale calls.’
      • ‘At the touch of a button one of the blank monitors blipped to life, displaying a scene that was being picked up by a hidden remote camera.’
      • ‘A new kid will use a remote explosive to take out a target efficiently, but it's messy and it's also very risky.’
      • ‘Walthall has spent hundreds of hours aboard NASA planes, operating remote sensors, but he is doing his research on the ground now.’
      • ‘There are several possible new markets, such as remote sensing and space tourism.’
      • ‘In the near future, with this type of system users would not know whether they controlled a remote microscope or a virtual microscope.’
      • ‘As remote sensing relies heavily on interpretation skills, local experts may help with the interpretation.’
      • ‘The 1.6 comes with electric windows, a radio / CD player, electric heated mirrors, alarm immobiliser and remote locking.’
      • ‘Options such as ABS brakes and remote locking will cost you extra.’
      • ‘Instead, a remote sensor placed outdoors transmits a radio signal to a monitor inside your house, which shows the data on a liquid crystal display.’
      • ‘The second type is proprietary and relies on custom software drivers that communicate to the remote chipset.’
      • ‘Baghdad and other cities are wracked by small arms and remote bomb ambushes and by mortar and rocket attacks, and are closed to commercial air traffic.’
      • ‘He set up a blind in ‘the great marsh’ and a remote camera beside a slough, rigged to take a photo whenever a creature crossed its infrared beam.’
      • ‘The SE models gain an electric sunroof, alloys and remote central locking.’
      • ‘A signal condition monitoring circuit drives an integral two-color LED and an alarm signal for remote monitoring at the control.’
      • ‘The specification list is comprehensive for a small car, although the absence of remote mirror adjustment was noted.’
      • ‘With the aid of a remote camera set 50 meters from the den, Christoph spent many hours watching her perform the intimate chores of motherhood.’
      • ‘He attached the little remote device for his ship onto the rifle.’
      • ‘There are other uses for cheap, expendable remote sensors.’
    2. 1.2 Distant in time.
      ‘a golden age in the remote past’
      • ‘The causes of their deaths were usually said to lie in people's wrong doings in both the recent and the remote past, and their invasion of forbidden domains.’
      • ‘They seem bent on taking the world back to an even more remote past, to when chaos lay on the face of the Earth; a time recorded in the Book of Genesis.’
      • ‘Still anything that engages the average reader with our remote past, even if in the form of a romantic time-condensing allegory, has got to be a good thing.’
      • ‘Bonded labour may sound like pages from the remote past but is shockingly a fact in the present day, just an hour's drive from the winter capital of Jammu and Kashmir.’
      • ‘Each idyll is a society in the distant future or the remote past that can be held up as a noble alternative to American society.’
      • ‘In my anxiety I got a much earlier train, and when I changed onto the branch line was afflicted with almost overpowering excitement at this journey into the remote past.’
      • ‘First, there are various pieces of evidence about monkeys being eaten in the remote past or in primitive cultures in more recent times.’
      • ‘At one level, the novel is about male sexual fantasies, at another it is about the role of memory, both the recent and remote past and how they intermesh with the present.’
      • ‘Is looking at such pictures really ‘necessary’, given that these horrors are in a past remote enough to be beyond punishment?’
      • ‘Seemingly different characters have the same name, a car accident happens in both the recent and the remote past, unrelated events have a strange symmetry.’
      • ‘This is the zone which, arguably, contains the most important sites for understanding responses to coastal processes in the more remote past, but which is the most difficult to protect or manage.’
      • ‘Although she had no recent history of trauma, in the remote past she had abdominal trauma that she had chosen not to have repaired.’
      • ‘It is also worth noting that the argument has nothing essential to do with a causal circumstance in the remote past.’
      • ‘Some of the pictures featured at the show were those sent by spacecraft such as Mariner 9 which reveal extensive channels made by flowing water in the remote past of the planet.’
      • ‘It gives us the opportunity to form some opinion not just of the physical circumstances of life in the remote past, but also of how such people might have thought and felt about life.’
      • ‘If determinism is true, then our acts are the consequences of the laws of nature and events in the remote past.’
      • ‘I would like to think that Colonial House at least gave us a different view of the remote past than the stereotypical textbook treatment we remember from high school.’
      • ‘Using these legends, he would come up with these radical theories of fabulous civilizations from remote past.’
      • ‘In other words, the Aboriginal past was remote and incidental.’
      • ‘Together, the remote past and the more recent development of ‘traditional’ festivals have much educationally to offer the people of England today.’
  • 2Having very little connection with or relationship to.

    ‘the theory seems rather intellectual and remote from everyday experience’
    • ‘Some were abstract and suggested forms and shapes, exquisite in themselves but remote from concrete reality.’
    • ‘It is ridiculous to suggest that this relationship would become more remote if there were single-seat constituencies.’
    • ‘The remaining six plaintiffs were excluded as claimants because they were in a more remote relationship - but it seems that on appeal they all lost and for a variety of reasons.’
    • ‘So there has to be some causal connection, however remote, though, does there not, between the acts done and the race of the person who is offended?’
    • ‘Sometimes they're only related in a very remote way.’
    • ‘Any remote relationship to terrorism will get you involved in one of these tribunals.’
    • ‘Neither illness has any remote connection to the vaccine.’
    • ‘American propaganda painted him as unbalanced and remote from reality.’
    • ‘Other times, the connection is more remote, or downright nonexistent.’
    irrelevant to, unrelated to, unconnected to, unconcerned with, not pertinent to, inapposite to, immaterial to, unassociated with, inappropriate to
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Distantly related.
      ‘a remote cousin’
      • ‘Status, rank, and patronage opportunities had rarely been of greater importance and even remote family connections could be of real use.’
      • ‘He could have made the same point just as well without any discussion of remote genetic relationships.’
      • ‘Chinese is a language rich in kinship terms, but the point is that, whatever sort of relative Mr Li was, he was a remote one.’
      • ‘On the face of it, the objection of any surviving relative, however remote, bars any transplant.’
  • 3(of a chance or possibility) unlikely to occur.

    ‘chances of a genuine and lasting peace become even more remote’
    • ‘The Mining Scout decided to check out the abandoned vessel, on the remote chance that there may still be people aboard.’
    • ‘The chances of this kind of relationship coming about between three individuals seems highly remote to me.’
    • ‘As flight lead I hadn't discussed a divert option in detail because I felt the chances were remote based on the weather forecast.’
    • ‘The risk of crime - much less terrorism - had always been remote.’
    • ‘If his victory stands, the immediate prospect for reducing tension across the strait appears remote.’
    • ‘But with two burly dogs giving us a chase, this seemed a remote possibility.’
    • ‘Many Koreans realize that it is presently unrealistic and a remote possibility to envision a unified Korea.’
    • ‘A free-kick from 30 yards out seemed too remote to be dangerous.’
    • ‘The disease may have been transmitted to 1056 patients through surgical instruments, however, the likelihood of transmission is remote.’
    • ‘Nervously, I knew that there was a remote chance that Alex was here, and that Alex had Andrea somewhere.’
    • ‘Because if you use it on weird foot cramps, there's a remote possibility that you could loosen a blood clot and cause heart damage or even death.’
    • ‘And she'd been stupid enough to believe there was even a remote chance he might actually like her as a friend?’
    • ‘Both prospects seem to me to have been relatively remote.’
    • ‘It's not hers so there's still that remote chance she's still out there somewhere alive and - we're still clinging to that.’
    • ‘I want you to hear what he said about that albeit remote possibility.’
    • ‘Once a ball touches an infielder, the chance of a runner interfering with a batted ball becomes remote.’
    • ‘If it is, the chances of bringing a successful legal action must be remote.’
    • ‘Is there even a remote possibility of a person who hadn't seen his four previous films, plus his comics and website, understanding the film?’
    • ‘Just suppose that cloning a human was no longer a remote possibility, but a scientific reality.’
    • ‘Five hundred and sixteen other patients who also had surgery there have been warned of the remote possibility of exposure.’
    unlikely, improbable, implausible, doubtful, dubious, far-fetched
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  • 4(of a person) aloof and unfriendly in manner.

    ‘Maria seemed remote and patronizing’
    • ‘She is a cold, remote, autocratic figurehead with monarchical delusions and the instincts of a contract killer.’
    • ‘Visibly thrilled over his visit, he says that contrary to apprehension that he would be cold and remote, the Prince came across as a very amenable and caring person.’
    • ‘While seen as personally remote and aloof, Collins came across as fair and measured in meetings with unions.’
    aloof, distant, detached, impersonal, withdrawn, reserved, uncommunicative, unforthcoming, unapproachable, unresponsive, indifferent, unconcerned, preoccupied, abstracted
    View synonyms
  • 5Computing
    Denoting a device which can only be accessed by means of a network.

    Compare with local
    • ‘Mira allows you to log into a Windows XP computer from a much simpler and less expensive remote device.’
    • ‘The rlogin command gives you easier access to remote machines than telnet.’
    • ‘Manufacturers can also use RMS to load new profiles or operating systems into remote devices.’
    • ‘PingAlarm is a tiny application that sits in the system tray, and has a green light that turns red if any remote device is down.’
    • ‘It is challenging to make a Windows system log to a remote device.’

noun

  • A remote control device.

    • ‘Then he snatched up the remote off the coffee table and pressed play.’
    • ‘She moved into the kitchen and Merlin picked up a remote off the table.’
    • ‘Pheobe picked up the remotes and turned on the TV & cable box.’
    • ‘Finally I found what I was looking for, the remote to my stereo.’
    • ‘Thus, we are often called upon to help customers get hard-to-find batteries for their watches and cordless phones and remotes and stuff.’
    • ‘In this case the trailers are for Mystery, Alaska, Outside Providence, and Happy, Texas and are skipped using the chapter search button on most remotes.’
    • ‘They really should make homing devices to go with TV remotes.’
    • ‘The T.V. went to commercial and Jaime grabbed the remote to turn the mute on.’
    • ‘She forced him to sit and relax, handing him the remote to the TV.’
    • ‘He popped one in and jumped back on the couch with remote in hand.’
    • ‘Some universal remotes can be large and unwieldy with way too many buttons, many of which wind up going unused.’
    • ‘I picked up the remote to the stereo and turned it down a bit.’
    • ‘She grabbed the remote off the coffee table, and flipped the TV off.’
    • ‘Stilled half asleep, he fumbled with the remote to turn it off.’
    • ‘Long-time State fans will appreciate the show's insider feel, but most channel surfers will find little reason to lower their remotes.’
    • ‘I glared at them both, my arms crossed, remote in hand.’
    • ‘Some high-tech remotes also include programmable timers.’
    • ‘As the user, you can interface with the system via keypads, touch screens, panic buttons, TV screens, computers, telephones, handheld remotes or other devices.’
    • ‘Then the woman who owns the place uses her remote to turn on a video.’
    • ‘Instead she rolled over and rummaged through her bedside table for the remote to her stereo.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘far apart’): from Latin remotus ‘removed’, past participle of removere (see remove).

Pronunciation

remote

/rəˈmōt//rəˈmoʊt/