Definition of relegate in US English:

relegate

verb

[with object]
  • Consign or dismiss to an inferior rank or position.

    ‘they aim to prevent women from being relegated to a secondary role’
    • ‘The music, his real career, was relegated to after-hours and vacations.’
    • ‘As the present academic system is totally different, the importance of good handwriting has been relegated to the background.’
    • ‘She would be relegated to the ranks of his subordinates once more.’
    • ‘I also saw that men were relegated to supporting the status quo even at their own expense if they choose to accept it.’
    • ‘As a result, even a three-year-old boy becomes the legal chief of the family and his mother is relegated to an inferior social status.’
    • ‘Not that they can't make quilts, but it has been relegated to a craft and an inferior position for so long.’
    • ‘We feel that economic failure has created a situation where survival and law have been relegated to antagonistic positions.’
    • ‘Indeed, most of the program-related discussion is relegated to a couple of chapters buried deep in the middle of the book.’
    • ‘I'm so pleased that he has been relegated to another set of duties.’
    • ‘Those who did not tell the president what he wanted to hear were relegated to positions of little influence.’
    • ‘Under such a setup, religion is relegated to the realm of the private, and in the public domain it is merely an agent for the delivery of social welfare.’
    • ‘In the United States, he is relegated to subordinate positions and rendered passive by white society.’
    • ‘Privatization can only mean less control is vested in public discourse and more is relegated to the demands of profit.’
    • ‘And that is not to say that the poll will result in the childcare issue being relegated to the footnotes of party manifestos.’
    • ‘The purpose of mutual assistance in time of illness or death was often relegated to a second position, after moral improvement.’
    • ‘Most of them were relegated to rear echelon positions or they were stewards on the boats or on the ships.’
    • ‘It's as if our ability to find excitement in the world around us has been relegated to only those activities that charge for admission.’
    • ‘Many of them complain about the second-class role they were relegated to.’
    • ‘The supernatural is relegated to the rank of mild amusement.’
    • ‘Curries were relegated to just breakfast and lunches at home.’
    downgrade, lower, lower in rank, lower in status, put down, move down
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘send into exile’): from Latin relegat- ‘sent away, referred’, from the verb relegare, from re- ‘again’ + legare ‘send’.

Pronunciation

relegate

/ˈrɛləˌɡeɪt//ˈreləˌɡāt/