Definition of relapse in English:

relapse

verb

[NO OBJECT]
Pronunciation /rəˈlaps//rəˈlæps/
  • 1(of someone suffering from a disease) suffer deterioration after a period of improvement.

    • ‘Tell them I've relapsed if you have to, but please don't tell them what I've been doing.’
    • ‘He ended up relapsing and he also ended up dying on the street.’
    • ‘Thirteen patients relapsed after positive response to therapy and developed tumors at pre-existing or new sites within the body.’
    • ‘However, when light therapy was discontinued, patients quickly relapsed, whereas patients on tryptophan had a slower relapse rate.’
    • ‘One patient relapsed upon discontinuation of clarithromycin therapy but has since responded to re-initiation of treatment.’
    • ‘The patient had relapsed 1 year prior to the current presentation and was treated with 2-clorodeoxyadenosine.’
    • ‘Two of the 11 patients relapsed on valproic acid.’
    • ‘If patients relapsed, they were crossed over to the other treatment regimen.’
    • ‘It was reported some patients relapsed within days to months after the reserpine treatment.’
    • ‘When people relapsed despite the aversions, the researchers asked them a lot of questions about what happened.’
    • ‘In the nortriptyline-lithium group, only one patient relapsed after five weeks of medication.’
    • ‘Ten out of the eleven patients relapsed after discontinuing MPA against medical advice.’
    • ‘This finding is clinically significant since it explains why many patients relapsed after being directly switched from clozapine to risperidone.’
    • ‘They have relapsed back into their old ways, the revival already forgotten.’
    • ‘We offered endoscopy to patients who relapsed.’
    • ‘All patients were cured ultimately and no patients relapsed during six months of follow up.’
    • ‘And she didn't have that at that point, so she's relapsing.’
    • ‘He has apparently given up drugs on three or four occasions, but he has relapsed.’
    • ‘Anyone who has familiarity with chemical dependency treatment knows of circumstances where leaders have relapsed or not been honest about their recovery.’
    • ‘Ten patients relapsed after the completion of treatment.’
    get ill again, get worse again, have a relapse, suffer a relapse, worsen, deteriorate, degenerate, take a turn for the worse, sicken, weaken, fail, sink
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1relapse into Return to (a less active or a worse state)
      ‘he relapsed into silence’
      • ‘The main goal of this intervention is to keep him motivated and to avoid a relapse into a less active lifestyle.’
      • ‘This turns out to be a great strain after some time, and it relapses into its bad ways again.’
      • ‘As for Hodge, there is little doubt that he will relapse into his traditional scapegoat role today in the eyes of the Scottish rugby public.’
      • ‘He calls it a blip and likens it to a reformed alcoholic relapsing into a 24-hour binge.’
      • ‘Two clients relapsed to abusive drinking, and one of those clients was charged with a third driving-under-the-influence citation.’
      • ‘For many of the respondents, living on the streets meant relapsing into drug use.’
      • ‘But after three decades of lull, it has started relapsing into anarchy and violence.’
      • ‘The Lords sought to change the legislation to make it apply to people who had suffered debilitating depression and had recovered but then relapsed into further bouts.’
      • ‘Let it be hoped that we can refrain from relapsing into the bad old habits once the dreaded epidemic is over, so a new Shanghai with a new outlook will emerge in the long run.’
      • ‘Different people relapse into silence for different reasons.’
      • ‘If that's true, then a former inmate who already has what it takes to clean up his act isn't likely to relapse into a life of crime just because he can't cast a ballot.’
      • ‘At home, however, he relapsed into his shakahari ways.’
      • ‘He would have stable periods in a relationship and then relapse into physical abuse.’
      • ‘He had lost the employment through no fault of his own, rowed with his girlfriend and the combination led him to relapse into drinking and taking too many pills.’
      • ‘Despite claims she has relapsed into her old eating habits, Mary-Kate's spokesman said it was something all patients had to do when they were released..’
      • ‘Burma, so beautiful and prosperous 50 years ago, has relapsed into barbarity.’
      • ‘Doctors do not know how many relapsed into mental listlessness or took the extreme step.’
      • ‘We're spending a whale of a lot of money to try to do that, and we'd prefer that it not relapse into becoming another haven or sanctuary for terrorists that go around the world killing people.’
      • ‘Careful checks are made on how people fare after the help and very few relapse into this type of problem.’
      • ‘Bankura superintendent of police Anil Kumar said that the family members had relapsed into sullen silence, refusing to speak to anyone.’
      revert, lapse
      View synonyms

noun

Pronunciation /ˈrēˌlaps//ˈriˌlæps/
  • A deterioration in someone's state of health after a temporary improvement.

    ‘he responded well to treatment, but then suffered a relapse’
    • ‘In all patients with relapses of the disease this biochemical parameter shows its importance.’
    • ‘A small proportion of patients with mucosal disease will have repeated relapses.’
    • ‘In the first placebo controlled trial conducted in rapid cycling disorder, lamotrigine improved the overall relapse rate.’
    • ‘These agents offer shorter treatment courses, higher cure rates and fewer relapses.’
    • ‘The drug reduced the rate of clinical relapses in MS patients by up to 66% and was slowing the development of brain lesions.’
    • ‘During follow up some of them had a bacteriological relapse of the disease within one and a half years.’
    • ‘In salmonella infections relapses of enteritis or bacteraemia are common.’
    • ‘Patients with frequent relapses often exhibit new lesions after enhancement with gadolinium, indicating focal breakdown of the blood-brain barrier.’
    • ‘She emphasised she had a realistic plan to try and avoid a relapse into the cycle of drug use and crime which has had her in its grip for the past five years.’
    • ‘In view of these considerations, the selection of empirical treatment regimens for patients with relapses should be based on the prior treatment scheme.’
    • ‘The secretary fills such crucial roles as mapping patient response to drug therapies aimed at reducing relapses and resulting disability, a relatively new dimension in MS care.’
    • ‘The measure of the sterilizing activity of a regimen is reflected by the relapse rate after successful treatment.’
    • ‘Systemically administered steroids have been shown to decrease hospital admission rates and prevent asthma relapses.’
    • ‘Lower doses of metronidazole are often effective in invasive disease but may fail to eliminate the intraluminal infection, allowing clinical relapses to occur.’
    • ‘The primary endpoint at one-year was the reduction in the rate of clinical relapses.’
    • ‘Discrimination may bring on loss of job, home, or friendship, precipitating a depressive episode or relapses of schizophrenia.’
    • ‘However, once treatment was stopped, there were no differences in the rates of relapses and new brain lesions between the two groups.’
    • ‘Despite initial immunological or pharmacological control, remote relapses of intracellular leishmanial infections are well recognised.’
    • ‘Many of these patients also experienced a relapse of their psychotic illness after the pregnancy.’
    • ‘During the treatment period, the drug significantly reduced new lesions in the brain and reduced the number of patients suffering relapses.’
    deterioration, worsening of someone's condition, turn for the worse, setback, weakening
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin relaps- ‘slipped back’, from the verb relabi, from re- ‘back’ + labi ‘to slip’. Early senses referred to a return to heresy or wrongdoing.

Pronunciation

relapse

Verb/rəˈlæps/

relapse

Noun/ˈriˌlæps/