Definition of reinter in English:

reinter

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Bury (a corpse) again, often in a different place than that of the first burial.

    • ‘They were reinterred several hours later after a Home Office pathologist, in the presence of an independent pathologist, carried out a new post-mortem examination at a local mortuary.’
    • ‘In 1926 he was reinterred in his homeland valley.’
    • ‘The men's bodies were found 10 days after their deaths by the Resistance in St Maximin, France, where they were buried and later they were reinterred in an American cemetery in France.’
    • ‘After the Restoration, Charles ordered the remains to be reinterred in St Giles.’
    • ‘His body was exhumed some months later and reinterred in a martyrs' cemetery not far away, where it remains to this day.’
    • ‘A spokesman for the Church of England's York Diocese said the remains were now to be reinterred close to the imposing 850-year-old parish church of St Mary's.’
    • ‘Her body was later exhumed and reinterred in Norwich cathedral, 5 miles from her childhood home.’
    • ‘A post-mortem examination was carried out before the body was reinterred.’
    • ‘Police say that the bones, which were found dumped beneath a motorway, have now been reinterred at the cemetery.’
    • ‘Twenty British soldiers, who died on the first day of the Battle of Arras in 1917 and were found last year buried with their arms linked, have been reinterred.’
    • ‘Although initially buried in France, he was later reinterred at Marion, Alabama, on August 8, 1921.’
    • ‘His remains are also to be reinterred at the ceremony in two weeks' time.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the graves were dug up, the remains were reinterred, and the road is there now.’
    • ‘The remains of up to 20 bodies that were accidentally dug up by a mechanical digger working in a graveyard near Rathangan were reinterred at a special ecumenical service last week.’

Pronunciation

reinter

/ˌriɪnˈtər//ˌrēinˈtər/