Definition of rein in English:

rein

noun

usually reins
  • 1A long, narrow strap attached at one end to a horse's bit, typically used in pairs to guide or check a horse while riding or driving.

    • ‘They walked in and greeted the stable boy as he handed them both the reins to their horses.’
    • ‘Nora tightly clutched the horse's reins as she galloped along the countryside.’
    • ‘When they had gotten the horses all bridled and ready, Gina took the reins and led her horse over to the mounting block.’
    • ‘Sighing he too climbed up on the carriage and pulled on the reins driving the horses back to the mansion.’
    • ‘Her mare strained against the current but did not falter in her strength and all Sadie could do was hold tightly to the reins and trust the horse to make it across.’
    • ‘He reached around me, grasping the horse's reins, and spurred the creature into a gallop.’
    • ‘Cali took Chloe's reins and guided her back to the trailer.’
    • ‘Jamie took the reins and the horses began to canter quickly down the road.’
    • ‘Once out of town he flicked the reins and sent the horses into a gallop.’
    • ‘He walked over to Samantha's horse, grabbed the reins, and walked several yards away from the group, where they could not hear him.’
    • ‘She soon took the reins again and guided the horse back to the stables.’
    • ‘Handing the reins of his horse over to one of the stable boys, Conner started walking up the stairs to the large doors.’
    • ‘Sir Evelyn's squire bowed, holding out the reins to the horse.’
    • ‘Spotting them, she quickly grabbed the reins and led the horses back at a trot.’
    • ‘Then, with a shake of the reins, the horse galloped ahead and disappeared into the mist.’
    • ‘I concentrated on staring at my horse's reins, which were gripped so tightly in my hands that my knuckles turned white.’
    • ‘I accidentally tugged on the reins and the horse went even faster.’
    • ‘The old man handed the already saddled brown horse's reins to him.’
    • ‘Joe dismounted beside him and reached for the reins of Ben's horse.’
    • ‘Ben stepped down and threw the reins of his horse over the rail.’
    1. 1.1 The power to direct and control.
      ‘management is criticized for its unwillingness to let go of the reins of an organization and delegate routine tasks’
      • ‘After a short time at Dexter Avenue, the younger King wrestled the reins of leadership from the deacons.’
      • ‘Once Hathaway took the directing reins, he found himself having to improvise with the script on a daily basis.’
      • ‘Wall Street, of course, could not have been more excited by the prospect of taking control of the reins of the monetary system.’
      • ‘Or perhaps we should simply hand the reins of government directly to the people.’
      • ‘But when the celebrations die down, and when the euphoria subsides, do not forget for one moment who handed you back the reins of power.’
      • ‘Furthermore, there were many in that party who just thought it was their turn to grasp the reins of government authority.’
      • ‘The outstanding singer, songwriter, musician and producer did the majority of work on his new album himself, holding a tight rein on its creative direction.’
      • ‘The people of the country should be saved from the humiliation of a person of foreign origin holding the reins of power.’
      • ‘"Women who take the reins of power have always prompted mixed reactions.’
      • ‘European statesmen seized the opportunity to exploit these nationalist movements, while bringing them under a tight rein, in order to further the purposes of state power.’
      • ‘So he's handed the director's reins to someone else.’
      • ‘As Malcolm had said years ago, Dominic was playing a game, slowly moving Jeremy into a leadership role, while holding fast to the reins of power.’
      • ‘She also shows that Irish women are lagging way behind their EU counterparts in taking the reins of power when it comes to running the country.’
      • ‘We have to understand that rule of law is the first casualty when a lawless, fascist organisation takes over the reins of state.’
      • ‘Weil takes the reins on the melody and the chaos seems controlled when he's in command.’
      • ‘It is good to see younger members coming through to take over the reins from more established members, bringing a fresh approach to the running of the club.’
      • ‘Professional norms dictated faith and loyalty not just in deed but in spirit to whoever held the reins of power under the constitutional system.’
      • ‘John's tight personal hold on the legal and administrative reins of power were as much driven by a need to raise money as they were by his personal obsession with the minutiae of government.’
      • ‘He is letting a younger man take over the reins.’

verb

  • 1with object and adverbial Check or guide (a horse) by pulling on its reins.

    ‘he reined in his horse and waited for her’
    • ‘When the two horsemen reached one another, they reined in.’
    • ‘Katie reined her horse, Picket, to a stop at the top of the hill and looked down into the town of Gwen.’
    • ‘Both riders reined in their horses and dismounted.’
    • ‘He reined his horse away from her and pointed his sword at her.’
    • ‘Philip reined his horses in, bringing them to a complete halt at the side of the road as David stopped in front of them, blocking their path, and tied the reins off to hold the horses still.’
    • ‘He reined in his horse, stroking its glossy coat.’
    • ‘He reined his horse and turned about, cursing himself all the way.’
    • ‘A moment later, a shout caused them both to rein their horses around.’
    • ‘‘Something is not right here,’ Vivian said again, reining her horse to a stop.’
    • ‘Before David turned the corner down the street, he reined in his horse, and turned once more toward his wife and child.’
    • ‘Once they had put a few miles between themselves and the castle, he reined the horse in to stop.’
    • ‘We all reined in our horses, and Rowen dismounted.’
    • ‘Some tipped their worn hats at him in greeting as they passed, while others contentedly reined their horses onward, chewing thoughtfully on a strand of wheat.’
    • ‘He put up his arm to halt the other knights as he reined in his own horse, ‘We'll stop here for a few minutes before we get to the castle.’’
    • ‘Expertly reining her horse, she was soon side by side with him.’
    • ‘Improvising, he reined his horse back slightly, just enough to convince it to leave the position it knew it should take.’
    • ‘She was on the porch, shaking out rugs when he reined his horse to a stop.’
    • ‘They reined their horses up next to the arch.’
    • ‘The rider then reined in the horse and looked down the road towards him.’
    • ‘I mumbled, reining my horse up beside Jack's, who was leering into the trees, ‘They won't hurt us will they?’’
    • ‘She reined her horse to a stop in front of the house.’
    • ‘He reined his horse alongside hers; the groom dropped back to a discreet distance.’
    • ‘She reined in her horse at the gates and swung down, jamming one of the keys into the padlock on the gate.’
    • ‘After a few more moments Holly reined in her steed.’
    • ‘He reined in his horse and looked back in the direction they'd come from.’
    1. 1.1 Keep under control; restrain.
      ‘with an effort, she reined back her impatience’
      ‘critics noted the failure of the administration to rein in public spending’
      • ‘You could stand to rein in your jealousy a little, though, and your boyfriend may want to not fib about things that are going to exacerbate that quality in you.’
      • ‘He somehow reined in his emotions and managed a breathless ‘What?’’
      • ‘She admits that she has to be reined in on occasion.’
      • ‘He took a deep calming breath and reined in his temper.’
      • ‘Mr McDowell insisted that he would continue to rein in the overtime budget, which is expected to reach 64 million this year.’
      • ‘He also said there would be no income tax cuts in the forthcoming budget and that the Government's priority was to rein in spending.’
      • ‘The big unknown for hotels and restaurants that had factored corporate extravagance into their plans is how much spending will be reined in.’
      • ‘The progressive impulse brought down the original robber barons, and reined in corporate greed.’
      • ‘In 1858 Britain reined in the East India Company, dissolving its territorial power and making India the responsibility of the British crown.’
      • ‘Fears are growing in the city that the disease cannot be reined in as more people have been infected.’
      • ‘The wider the margins, the better management has reined in costs and kept business humming along.’
      • ‘The museum has been forced to rein in its work in many areas: cutting numbers of staff, reducing opening hours, cancelling exhibitions and installing a rota of closed galleries.’
      • ‘However, critics would say that the failure to rein in the incomes of the rich has meant that society in Britain is no more equal than it was in 1997.’
      • ‘In the process, they are helping policy makers rein in inflation.’
      • ‘As for revenue growth, investors still want to see it, but they've reined in their expectations.’
      • ‘After our long campaign, some of the outlaws are finally being reined in.’
      • ‘The reality over the next five years is that the Government will have far less resources and will have to rein in spending significantly.’
      • ‘Transnational corporations will only be reined in locally when they are brought under democratic control internationally.’
      • ‘Special police were drafted in to rein in the revelry.’
      • ‘If political leaders lack the control to rein in their more violent followers, they have no right to public protests.’
      restrain, check, curb, constrain, hold back, keep in check, keep under control, hold in, regulate, restrict, control, bridle, put the brakes on, slow down, curtail, limit, stop, arrest
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Usage

The idiomatic phrase a free rein, which derives from the literal meaning of using reins to control a horse, is sometimes misinterpreted and written as a free reign. More than a third of the citations for the phrase in the Oxford English Corpus use reign instead of rein

Phrases

  • draw rein

    • Stop one's horse.

      • ‘She drew rein, bringing her horse to a halt and facing the largest of the raiders.’
      • ‘Her father guided the mare carefully through the courtyard to the front of the stone-built castle, then drew rein in front of a blond little boy sitting outside the wide arched doorway.’
      • ‘Her words tumbled over themselves as she told her father everything she had done, and before she realized it he was drawing rein in front of their own home.’
      • ‘Lancaster drew rein, tethering his horse in the thicket of pine just off the crest of the hill.’
  • keep a tight rein on

    • Exercise strict control over; allow little freedom to.

      ‘her only chance of survival was to keep a tight rein on her feelings and words’
      • ‘But while the company controls advertising and chooses programmes, the state-run TV station keeps a tight rein on news programming.’
      • ‘In this way the ships captain kept a tight rein on his men and when the ship set sail it was with a suitably chastened crew, or so the Captain thought.’
      • ‘Analysts say the regime will keep a tight rein on dissidents and focus on securing social and political stability.’
      • ‘She's very spontaneous and can be aggressive at times, though she's usually able to keep a tight rein on that.’
      • ‘She almost seemed artificial, especially with how she kept a tight rein on her emotions, remaining perfectly in control at all times.’
      • ‘Revenues had to be grown through adding costs and capital to businesses and then keeping a tight rein on costs while watching profits grow.’
      • ‘The new policies are meant to keep a tight rein on teachers rather than students.’
      • ‘Morton keeps a tight rein on all aspects of the business.’
      • ‘She also defended the cost, and insisted she kept a tight rein on spending.’
      • ‘The filmmaker keeps a tight rein on her direction and storyline, and the film's strength lies in its view of war through the eyes of women.’
      exercise strict control over, keep on a tight rein, allow little freedom to, regulate, manage, discipline, regiment, keep in line, rule with a rod of iron
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Origin

Middle English: from Old French rene, based on Latin retinere ‘retain’.

Pronunciation

rein

/reɪn//rān/