Main definitions of recount in English

: recount1recount2

recount1

verb

  • reporting verb Tell someone about something; give an account of an event or experience.

    with object ‘I recounted the tale to Steve’
    with clause ‘he recounts how they often talked of politics’
    • ‘Join two of Ireland's finest storytellers recounting humorous and melancholy tales of Celtic Ireland.’
    • ‘In 1938, Orwell wrote ‘Homage to Catalonia’, which recounts his experiences fighting for the Republicans in the Spanish Civil War.’
    • ‘Naturally we are meant to question the reliability of a narrator who recounts events he never physically witnessed.’
    • ‘He survived and wrote a letter to the author recounting this incident.’
    • ‘The story of his own and his mother's survival is recounted in his memoir with stunning visual detail.’
    • ‘The film recounts the events of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, in which the world teetered on the brink of nuclear war for nearly two weeks after Castro allowed Soviet nuclear missiles to be placed in Cuba.’
    • ‘The two actors tell Alberta's life story by flashing back to when she was ten and then recounting different events of her life.’
    • ‘I just had to keep recounting and reliving the experience.’
    • ‘Later, I recounted this experience to another friend who lives locally.’
    • ‘In addition to recounting events, Maupassant describes the beggar's thoughts and his feelings.’
    • ‘The extracts below from her report recount the problems she experienced in getting information for her inquiry.’
    • ‘As well as the violence, however, the diary also recounts the hardship experienced by the miners' families and the comradeship that saw them through.’
    • ‘Now, as one of around 100 volunteers working at the museum, he recounts his experiences to visitors.’
    • ‘I can only guess why he chose not to recount what he experienced and witnessed in those years.’
    • ‘In Huang's letter, he recounted how he was dragged into this matter.’
    • ‘Often and inevitably they will recount what is said to have happened to individuals.’
    • ‘He recounts how he and his comrades were among the last to be evacuated.’
    • ‘Like the myth of Hercules, the legend of Samson is a tale recounted in many cultures.’
    • ‘Hardwicke recounts the real life events that led to the development of the script.’
    • ‘He recounted how she had taken the letters, and the two men laughed.’
    • ‘Unlike Lampton, however, Suettinger writes from the perspective of an insider, who did not merely witness many of the events he recounts but had a hand in shaping them.’
    tell, relate, narrate, give an account of, describe, portray, depict, paint, unfold, set forth, present, report, outline, delineate, retail, recite, repeat, rehearse, relay, convey, communicate, impart
    View synonyms

noun

  • An act or instance of giving an account of an event or experience.

    ‘one woman's recount of a prolonged battle with “huge centipedes.”’
    • ‘In the past, there has been poetry, short stories, recounts of an event, etc.’
    • ‘By the time we were at the classroom door, I had finished my recount of events and Melany was frowning in thought.’
    • ‘Tom ended his recount of the events leading up to the murder there but promised that more on the saga would be revealed on February 4 at the Boys' School.’
    • ‘The recount of the events was bad enough but Trent's quotes were almost too much to take.’
    • ‘Before he knew it, his recount of the events was over.’
    • ‘Here is a recount of my experience with someone with that attitude.’
    • ‘This isn't a pro or con account of the night, simply a recount of a less-than entertaining performance.’
    • ‘Persepolis offers more than just a historical recount of past events; it adds a human face to those times.’
    • ‘She'd never been outside the forest, and the river was well outside the boundaries of the tribal lands, she remembered once from her father's recounts of his travels.’
    • ‘Assuming that Hansen is sick of rehashing seemingly ancient events, however, the book's recount of the two years leading up to her arrest is outstanding.’
    • ‘It was the usual recount of social events, told with the sharp wit of the infamous Lady Featherington.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old Northern French reconter ‘tell again’, based on Old French counter (see count).

Pronunciation

recount

/riˈkount//rɪˈkaʊnt/

Main definitions of recount in English

: recount1recount2

recount2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Count again.

    • ‘At one stage we tried counting how many stars there were, but it got too confusing as we counted and recounted a dot or two.’
    • ‘Under state law, it is very clear that under those circumstances you've got to recount all the ballots.’
    • ‘Half an hour later, the judge recounted the scores and declared Budd the winner.’
    • ‘He then proceeded to count and recount the hundreds of dollars he had with him, on a nearby desk, in full view of everybody.’

noun

  • An act of counting something again, especially votes in an election.

    • ‘There will be no need for a recount or a hand count to verify the accuracy of these figures.’
    • ‘It further asserted that he would have won by 225 votes if recounts had been completed in the four Florida counties where Gore was seeking them.’
    • ‘On Friday 1,000 protesters converged on the Miami-Dade County Hall to protest the canvassing board's refusal to complete a manual recount of votes.’
    • ‘An angry crowd had demanded a recount of the vote.’
    • ‘Roberts and another member voted for the recount, but the panel's chairman Charles Burton dissented.’
    • ‘In Hull - one of the few Yorkshire local authorities to begin vote-counting last night - UKIP candidate John Cornforth won the Derringham ward by seven votes after six recounts.’
    • ‘Despite the controversy over the vote recount in Florida, the next US president will soon be on the center stage.’
    • ‘In fact, the final outcome of the vote, like that of a slightly more publicized election, was delayed by absentee votes and a recount of contested ballots.’
    • ‘Republican Bill Hollowell has requested and been granted a manual recount of votes in his effort to overturn the initial result of the November 7 balloting.’
    • ‘Democrats insist that if election officials decline a manual recount of the votes, it is open to them to seek an order from a judge.’
    • ‘He made no apologies for dragging out the counts and recounts.’
    • ‘A manual recount of the votes cast in the November 7 election is currently going on at the county's Emergency Operations Center in Plantation, Florida.’
    • ‘He went on to reject the proposal made earlier that evening by Vice President Gore for a state-wide manual recount of the votes in Florida.’
    • ‘The vote recounts do not consider the variety of other ways in which citizens were denied the right to vote.’
    • ‘What is the deadline for requesting a recount or contesting the election?’
    • ‘He lost his seat in Dublin South East after a marathon count and recount in the last election.’
    • ‘In Florida, election officials began a recount of nearly six million votes.’
    • ‘Green Party candidate David Cobb and Libertarian Party candidate Michael Badnarik have sought a recount of the votes in Ohio.’
    • ‘Let us remember first and foremost that a very close election result that even necessitated a recount of the votes is the sign of democracy rather than the contrary.’
    • ‘Counts and recounts of Friday's votes were continuing in three constituencies last night, with just a handful of the 166 seats still to be decided.’

Pronunciation

recount

/rēˈkount/